flowlayout vs. gridlayout

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Stephen, Dec 5, 2003.

  1. Stephen

    Stephen Guest

    I am about to start my first project in asp .net. I like
    the gridlayout but is there anyt limitations or obstacles
    hing I should know about before proceeding with this page
    layout?
     
    Stephen, Dec 5, 2003
    #1
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  2. Grid Layout uses CSS for absolute positioning, so if you use it, you want to
    make sure to account for browser differences.

    --
    HTH,
    Kevin Spencer
    ..Net Developer
    Microsoft MVP
    Big things are made up
    of lots of little things.

    "Stephen" <> wrote in message
    news:da2f01c3bb3e$107f98f0$...
    > I am about to start my first project in asp .net. I like
    > the gridlayout but is there anyt limitations or obstacles
    > hing I should know about before proceeding with this page
    > layout?
     
    Kevin Spencer, Dec 5, 2003
    #2
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  3. Flow layout emits the type of HTML you are most familiar with, which (if
    designed properly) can scale to the user's resolution.

    Grid layout is designed to be very VB-ish in the designer. You put things
    where you want them, and they will be exactly there. It achieves this using
    absolute positioning of each HTML element on the page, which is measured in
    pixels. Everything is always in exactly the same place, whether you are
    looking at it on an 800 x 600 display or a 1920 x 1200 display.

    My preference (in case it wasn't obvious) is for flow layout - I think it's
    irresponsible of designers to target the lowest common denominator with a
    specific number of pixels. Take a look at cnn.com or msn.com on a high-dpi
    widescreen monitor, and you'll get a feel for just how much this kind of
    rigid design sucks when in an environment for which it wasn't optimized. The
    web is objectively different than print, and it's irresponsible that layouts
    (particularly of huge sites like these) don't leverage the platform.

    Not that I have strong feelings about this or anything...

    That being said, it is a lot easier to get things exactly where you want,
    and do so really fast, using the grid layout, so it's not always
    inappropriate.

    --
    Chris Jackson
    Software Engineer
    Microsoft MVP - Windows Client
    Windows XP Associate Expert
    --
    More people read the newsgroups than read my email.
    Reply to the newsgroup for a faster response.
    (Control-G using Outlook Express)
    --

    "Stephen" <> wrote in message
    news:da2f01c3bb3e$107f98f0$...
    > I am about to start my first project in asp .net. I like
    > the gridlayout but is there anyt limitations or obstacles
    > hing I should know about before proceeding with this page
    > layout?
     
    Chris Jackson, Dec 5, 2003
    #3
  4. Stephen

    Jason S Guest

    Chris,

    Amen brother. I couldn't agree more. While I realize that the most common
    resolution is 800x600 (hard to believe I know but all those baby boomers are
    getting older now and like large type), I still think the big guys can spend
    a couple of extra bucks and get thier designers to account for larger
    screens.

    I mean for chrissakes look at builder.com in a hi res screen. It's
    atrocious. Ok, background graphics in table cells looks nice but I would
    rather have a scaled width.

    Bleh,
    Jason S.

    "Chris Jackson" <chrisjATmvpsDOTorgNOSPAM> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Flow layout emits the type of HTML you are most familiar with, which (if
    > designed properly) can scale to the user's resolution.
    >
    > Grid layout is designed to be very VB-ish in the designer. You put things
    > where you want them, and they will be exactly there. It achieves this

    using
    > absolute positioning of each HTML element on the page, which is measured

    in
    > pixels. Everything is always in exactly the same place, whether you are
    > looking at it on an 800 x 600 display or a 1920 x 1200 display.
    >
    > My preference (in case it wasn't obvious) is for flow layout - I think

    it's
    > irresponsible of designers to target the lowest common denominator with a
    > specific number of pixels. Take a look at cnn.com or msn.com on a high-dpi
    > widescreen monitor, and you'll get a feel for just how much this kind of
    > rigid design sucks when in an environment for which it wasn't optimized.

    The
    > web is objectively different than print, and it's irresponsible that

    layouts
    > (particularly of huge sites like these) don't leverage the platform.
    >
    > Not that I have strong feelings about this or anything...
    >
    > That being said, it is a lot easier to get things exactly where you want,
    > and do so really fast, using the grid layout, so it's not always
    > inappropriate.
    >
    > --
    > Chris Jackson
    > Software Engineer
    > Microsoft MVP - Windows Client
    > Windows XP Associate Expert
    > --
    > More people read the newsgroups than read my email.
    > Reply to the newsgroup for a faster response.
    > (Control-G using Outlook Express)
    > --
    >
    > "Stephen" <> wrote in message
    > news:da2f01c3bb3e$107f98f0$...
    > > I am about to start my first project in asp .net. I like
    > > the gridlayout but is there anyt limitations or obstacles
    > > hing I should know about before proceeding with this page
    > > layout?

    >
    >
     
    Jason S, Dec 5, 2003
    #4
  5. You should use FlowLayout most of the time.
    Grid layout is only useful for specialized circumstances. I don't know why
    they made it the default.
    You can change this default on a per project basis.
    In the solution explorer window, right click on your project and select
    properties.
    Then under Common Properties select Designer Defaults.
    There you can set the default page layout for your project to FlowLayout.

    --
    I hope this helps,
    Steve C. Orr, MCSD, MVP
    http://Steve.Orr.net
    Hire top-notch developers at http://www.able-consulting.com



    "Stephen" <> wrote in message
    news:da2f01c3bb3e$107f98f0$...
    > I am about to start my first project in asp .net. I like
    > the gridlayout but is there anyt limitations or obstacles
    > hing I should know about before proceeding with this page
    > layout?
     
    Steve C. Orr [MVP, MCSD], Dec 5, 2003
    #5
  6. Stephen

    mikeb Guest

    I agree as well.

    Now is there a way to get the VS.NET Web Projects template to default to
    flow layout so I don't have to change it myself every time?

    --
    mikeb


    Jason S wrote:
    > Chris,
    >
    > Amen brother. I couldn't agree more. While I realize that the most common
    > resolution is 800x600 (hard to believe I know but all those baby boomers are
    > getting older now and like large type), I still think the big guys can spend
    > a couple of extra bucks and get thier designers to account for larger
    > screens.
    >
    > I mean for chrissakes look at builder.com in a hi res screen. It's
    > atrocious. Ok, background graphics in table cells looks nice but I would
    > rather have a scaled width.
    >
    > Bleh,
    > Jason S.
    >
    > "Chris Jackson" <chrisjATmvpsDOTorgNOSPAM> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Flow layout emits the type of HTML you are most familiar with, which (if
    >>designed properly) can scale to the user's resolution.
    >>
    >>Grid layout is designed to be very VB-ish in the designer. You put things
    >>where you want them, and they will be exactly there. It achieves this

    >
    > using
    >
    >>absolute positioning of each HTML element on the page, which is measured

    >
    > in
    >
    >>pixels. Everything is always in exactly the same place, whether you are
    >>looking at it on an 800 x 600 display or a 1920 x 1200 display.
    >>
    >>My preference (in case it wasn't obvious) is for flow layout - I think

    >
    > it's
    >
    >>irresponsible of designers to target the lowest common denominator with a
    >>specific number of pixels. Take a look at cnn.com or msn.com on a high-dpi
    >>widescreen monitor, and you'll get a feel for just how much this kind of
    >>rigid design sucks when in an environment for which it wasn't optimized.

    >
    > The
    >
    >>web is objectively different than print, and it's irresponsible that

    >
    > layouts
    >
    >>(particularly of huge sites like these) don't leverage the platform.
    >>
    >>Not that I have strong feelings about this or anything...
    >>
    >>That being said, it is a lot easier to get things exactly where you want,
    >>and do so really fast, using the grid layout, so it's not always
    >>inappropriate.
    >>
    >>--
    >>Chris Jackson
    >>Software Engineer
    >>Microsoft MVP - Windows Client
    >>Windows XP Associate Expert
    >>--
    >>More people read the newsgroups than read my email.
    >>Reply to the newsgroup for a faster response.
    >>(Control-G using Outlook Express)
    >>--
    >>
    >>"Stephen" <> wrote in message
    >>news:da2f01c3bb3e$107f98f0$...
    >>
    >>>I am about to start my first project in asp .net. I like
    >>>the gridlayout but is there anyt limitations or obstacles
    >>>hing I should know about before proceeding with this page
    >>>layout?

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    mikeb, Dec 5, 2003
    #6
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