"form" works but want a bit more to happen

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Leif K-Brooks, Jan 26, 2005.

  1. ....D. wrote:
    > I made a table with form entries in it. I used the "mailto" code to send
    > the results to. It works fine, for what it does.


    Generally a bad idea on the Web. Even when your user has a
    properly-configured email client -- not a safe bet -- you still have to
    worry about Web browsers which don't know how to handle mailto: form
    actions, which is a lot of them.

    > 2nd - Is there a way to have HTML code automatically send a specific email
    > back to the submitter's email address after a successful submission? If
    > not HTML - then what?


    You'll want to use a server-side script to handle the form instead of a
    mailto: action. Your host will have to support this first; look for PHP,
    CGI, or (ick!) ASP in the feature list. Two relevant links:

    http://php.net/mail
    http://www.phpfreaks.com/quickcode/code/151.php



    > If it is any help at all, here is the HTML table code used in the form.
    > Maybe you can fill in what I need if it is possible with HTML:
    >
    > <snip large code>


    In the future, please try to provide a link instead of including lengthy
    code snippets in email.
     
    Leif K-Brooks, Jan 26, 2005
    #1
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  2. Leif K-Brooks

    ...D. Guest

    I made a table with form entries in it. I used the "mailto" code to send
    the results to. It works fine, for what it does.

    But how do I take this a step further? I'd like it to do two additional
    things.

    (OK, I'll add this right here now. A request - if all you are going to
    do is to refer me to a vast web page somewhere, and you're basically
    telling me to look it up for myself, well, thanks for the effort, but
    please don't reply with such, unless it is very specific and real easy to
    find my answer on.)

    1st - I only know it works in my Outlook Express, and here's how: after
    I click the "submit" button, a little window comes up and says something
    like it is going to send the "email to:" (it is empty here, that's ok) and
    the "from:" is working. And I click to send, and it sends. quickly it
    sends - I know it has sent, even seeing a little bar or graph thingy (I
    think) but it happens so fast, and I am sitting there at the same form
    page. Or I can look in OE and into it's "sent" folder, and see that it
    was sent successfully (and to who). But I'd like more to happen: It would
    be great if it would say something like "Thank you. Your submission has
    been sent" after it was sent of course, or, somehow maybe automatically
    redirects the submitter to the website's home page after the email
    submission was sent. How would I do this - possible with HTML? Or do I
    need to do something else.

    2nd - Is there a way to have HTML code automatically send a specific email
    back to the submitter's email address after a successful submission? If
    not HTML - then what?

    In your experiences, do all different email programs, or if no email
    program, then how, through a email web page? - well do they all work with
    a standard "form", or are some people left out when trying to submit to a
    "mailto"?

    If it is any help at all, here is the HTML table code used in the form.
    Maybe you can fill in what I need if it is possible with HTML:

    <table width="400" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="1"
    align="center">
    <tr><td colspan="2">&nbsp;
    </td></tr>
    <tr>
    <form enctype="text/plain" action="mailto:"
    method="post">
    <td class="body"><b>Subject:</b></td>
    <td>
    <SELECT NAME="subline">
    <OPTION VALUE="More Information">More Information
    <OPTION VALUE="Schedule a Site Inspection">Schedule a Site
    Inspection
    </SELECT>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td class="body"><b>First Name:</b></td>
    <td><INPUT NAME="first" TYPE=TEXT SIZE=30> <b>*</b>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td class="body"><b>Last Name:</b></td>
    <td><INPUT NAME="last" TYPE=TEXT SIZE=30> <b>*</b>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td class="body"><b>E-mail Address:</b></td>
    <td><INPUT NAME="email" TYPE=TEXT SIZE=30> <b>*</b>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td height="20" class="body"><b>Phone:</b></td>
    <td height="20"><INPUT NAME="phone" TYPE=TEXT SIZE=30> <b>*</b>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td class="body"><b>Fax:</b></td>
    <td><INPUT NAME="fax" TYPE=TEXT SIZE=30>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td class="body"><b>Company:</b></td>
    <td><INPUT NAME="company" TYPE=TEXT SIZE=30>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td class="body"><b>Street:</b></td>
    <td><INPUT NAME="street" TYPE=TEXT SIZE=30>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td class="body"><b>City:</b></td>
    <td><INPUT NAME="city" TYPE=TEXT SIZE=30>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td class="body"><b>State:</b></td>
    <td><INPUT NAME="state" TYPE=TEXT SIZE=30>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td class="body"><b>Zip:</b></td>
    <td><INPUT NAME="zip" TYPE=TEXT SIZE=30>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td valign="top" class="body"><b>Comments:</b></td>
    <td><TEXTAREA NAME="comments" TYPE=TEXT ROWS="7" COLS="34"></TEXTAREA>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td><INPUT TYPE=SUBMIT VALUE="Submit"></td>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    </form></tr>
    <tr><td>&nbsp;</td><td class="body">(Note: "<b>*</b>" above denotes
    a required field)
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td colspan="2">&nbsp;
    </td></tr></table>

    ---end

    ...D.
     
    ...D., Jan 26, 2005
    #2
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  3. In article <>,
    d@no_usenet_email..org says...
    > I made a table with form entries in it. I used the "mailto" code to send
    > the results to. It works fine, for what it does.


    Wrong, wrong wrong. mailto: as a form action doesn't work. Google for
    the reasons why.

    --
    Hywel http://kibo.org.uk/
    I do not eat quiche.
     
    Hywel Jenkins, Jan 26, 2005
    #3
  4. Hywel Jenkins wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > d@no_usenet_email..org says...
    >
    >>I made a table with form entries in it. I used the "mailto" code to send
    >>the results to. It works fine, for what it does.

    >
    >
    > Wrong, wrong wrong. mailto: as a form action doesn't work. Google for
    > the reasons why.


    Unfortunately it does. If you specify in the action attribute something
    else than a URL then this is not defined (as stated by the W3C). So it's
    up to the clients UA to fill in a non-defined behaviour, and IE does
    allow explicitly to add a mailto: in the action attribute (see m$
    knowledge base for more info about this behaviour). I know: not very
    cool, but IE was designed to allow this (and it's not in breach with
    W3C, as it's simply not defined by W3C.. so some sort of a greyish
    specification). And please don't flame me for stating this... :)

    bernhard

    --
    www.daszeichen.ch
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    Bernhard Sturm, Jan 26, 2005
    #4
  5. Leif K-Brooks

    Guest

    Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    > Hywel Jenkins wrote:
    > > In article <>,
    > > d@no_usenet_email..org says...
    > >
    > >>I made a table with form entries in it. I used the "mailto" code

    to send
    > >>the results to. It works fine, for what it does.

    > >
    > >
    > > Wrong, wrong wrong. mailto: as a form action doesn't work. Google

    for
    > > the reasons why.

    >
    > Unfortunately it does. If you specify in the action attribute

    something
    > else than a URL then this is not defined (as stated by the W3C). So

    it's
    > up to the clients UA to fill in a non-defined behaviour, and IE does
    > allow explicitly to add a mailto: in the action attribute (see m$
    > knowledge base for more info about this behaviour). I know: not very
    > cool, but IE was designed to allow this (and it's not in breach with
    > W3C, as it's simply not defined by W3C.. so some sort of a greyish
    > specification). And please don't flame me for stating this... :)


    To me, "work" means that the form will submit regardless of the user's
    system configuration with reasonably predictable results, whether they
    have a mail client or not.

    --
    Hywel
     
    , Jan 26, 2005
    #5
  6. wrote:
    > Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    >
    >>Hywel Jenkins wrote:

    >
    > To me, "work" means that the form will submit regardless of the user's
    > system configuration with reasonably predictable results, whether they
    > have a mail client or not.


    Hmm that's okay for you, but there are a lot of cases where you would
    talk of a 'working' action attribute, but in reality it simply fails.
    E.g. I know of some sites where you have to submit your login details,
    and then the page redirects you to a page responding only on port 2082
    (CP panel for instance) or whatever... this does not 'work' here, as I
    sit behind a firewall (and I don't have the permission to open any ports
    on the firewall). I don't even get an error message from the page. It's
    just a pain, and an ordinary user would never find out what the problem
    actually is. He would claim: 'The site is 'poorly' programmed, and they
    know shit about the users needs and usability' (and he would be right).
    But the action attribute is perfectly 'legal' and according to the
    specs... So your definiton of 'working' is always different for someone
    else. In the just quoted example I wouldn't even call the original W3C
    definiton as 'working' :)
    BTW: we don't know what the OP really wants (if s/he is working on a
    intranet solution this might just do the trick for his/her purposes).
    However, I wouldn't use the mailto: for anything on a website.


    --
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    Bernhard Sturm, Jan 26, 2005
    #6
  7. In article <41f7bf70$1_1@127.0.0.1>, says...
    > wrote:
    > > Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    > >
    > >>Hywel Jenkins wrote:

    > >
    > > To me, "work" means that the form will submit regardless of the user's
    > > system configuration with reasonably predictable results, whether they
    > > have a mail client or not.

    >
    > Hmm that's okay for you, but there are a lot of cases where you would
    > talk of a 'working' action attribute, but in reality it simply fails.
    > E.g. I know of some sites where you have to submit your login details,
    > and then the page redirects you to a page responding only on port 2082
    > (CP panel for instance) or whatever... this does not 'work' here, as I
    > sit behind a firewall (and I don't have the permission to open any ports
    > on the firewall).


    That's a completely different issue, and there are probably reasons why
    you shouldn't be trying to access CPanel in that example.

    --
    Hywel http://kibo.org.uk/
    I do not eat quiche.
     
    Hywel Jenkins, Jan 26, 2005
    #7
  8. Hywel Jenkins wrote:
    > In article <41f7bf70$1_1@127.0.0.1>, says...
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Hywel Jenkins wrote:

    >>
    >> >

    >>
    >>>To me, "work" means that the form will submit regardless of the user's
    >>>system configuration with reasonably predictable results, whether they
    >>>have a mail client or not.

    >>
    >>Hmm that's okay for you, but there are a lot of cases where you would
    >>talk of a 'working' action attribute, but in reality it simply fails.
    >>E.g. I know of some sites where you have to submit your login details,
    >>and then the page redirects you to a page responding only on port 2082
    >>(CP panel for instance) or whatever... this does not 'work' here, as I
    >>sit behind a firewall (and I don't have the permission to open any ports
    >>on the firewall).

    >
    >
    > That's a completely different issue, and there are probably reasons why
    > you shouldn't be trying to access CPanel in that example.


    LOL. I am the owner of the website hosted by a host using CPanel. I pay
    for the usage of it. Now you tell me, that's a good reason not to use
    it... (see this happens, if you have no clue about your users settings
    and environment. I am not going to explain to you why we don't let
    anybody tamper with the firewall settings, just assume, that we have our
    reasons).
    Why is this a different issue? Obviously my clients environment is set
    up in such a way that I don't get the response from certain ports (and
    there are good reasons for this). No my point is this: as a webdesigner
    you never know in what environment your users are. You can design
    according to the specs and you will still run into a problem. Be it: you
    are using mailto: and your users don't have set up a mail client, be
    it you use a port which is blocked by a firewall. Now I suggest: tell
    the users what will happen. In both cases. If you have good reasons to
    use the mailto: in your action attribute, then inform the user before
    they will hit the send button what will happen. The same goes for the
    port URL: tell your audiance that in some circumstances it will not
    work... IMHO both cases are similar.

    >



    --
    www.daszeichen.ch
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    Bernhard Sturm, Jan 26, 2005
    #8
  9. In article <41f7ea84$1_2@127.0.0.1>, says...
    > Hywel Jenkins wrote:
    > > In article <41f7bf70$1_1@127.0.0.1>, says...
    > >
    > >> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>Hywel Jenkins wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>>To me, "work" means that the form will submit regardless of the user's
    > >>>system configuration with reasonably predictable results, whether they
    > >>>have a mail client or not.
    > >>
    > >>Hmm that's okay for you, but there are a lot of cases where you would
    > >>talk of a 'working' action attribute, but in reality it simply fails.
    > >>E.g. I know of some sites where you have to submit your login details,
    > >>and then the page redirects you to a page responding only on port 2082
    > >>(CP panel for instance) or whatever... this does not 'work' here, as I
    > >>sit behind a firewall (and I don't have the permission to open any ports
    > >>on the firewall).

    > >
    > >
    > > That's a completely different issue, and there are probably reasons why
    > > you shouldn't be trying to access CPanel in that example.

    >
    > LOL. I am the owner of the website hosted by a host using CPanel.


    Me too. Several, in fact.

    > I pay for the usage of it. Now you tell me, that's a good reason not to use
    > it... (see this happens, if you have no clue about your users settings
    > and environment. I am not going to explain to you why we don't let
    > anybody tamper with the firewall settings, just assume, that we have our
    > reasons).


    Why do your firewall settings affect your users? If you're running the
    firewall on which the CPanel stuff is located on, and your users can't
    access that because it's behind *your* firewall that's blocking port
    XXXX, then your users need to find another host. OTOH, if the CPanel
    stuff is hosted elsewhere, by another company, and the SysAdmin at your
    location is blocking the CPanel ports, then perhaps *he* has good reason
    to block those ports. For example, at home I can access CPanel no
    problem; at work, I can't because the SysAdmins there allow HTTP over a
    few ports only, and CPanel isn't running on the ports I can connect
    through.


    > Why is this a different issue?


    What's the "mailto:" issue? The fact is, regardless of whatever
    settings you or your user has, the browser attempts to submit the form
    data. That it can't connect to the server because of port blocking is
    not the point. With mailto, that's not a given.


    --
    Hywel http://kibo.org.uk/
    I do not eat quiche.
     
    Hywel Jenkins, Jan 26, 2005
    #9
  10. Hywel Jenkins wrote:
    >
    > For example, at home I can access CPanel no
    > problem; at work, I can't because the SysAdmins there allow HTTP over a
    > few ports only, and CPanel isn't running on the ports I can connect
    > through.


    so you gave yourself the answer.. it's as easy as this. we have a very
    paranoid firewall setting here and lived quite undisturbed, and we would
    like to keep it this way. (there are other ways to bypass a firewall,
    but I am not going to reveal them here, OT).

    > What's the "mailto:" issue? The fact is, regardless of whatever
    > settings you or your user has, the browser attempts to submit the form
    > data. That it can't connect to the server because of port blocking is
    > not the point. With mailto, that's not a given.


    don't forget that UAs are built by companies like M$. If they decide to
    implement the mailto: feature in their UA, then the UA will not try to
    connect ot a server, but instantly fire up the registered mail client.
    see:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/workshop/author/dhtml/reference/properties/action.asp
    and
    http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=279460


    --
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    Bernhard Sturm, Jan 26, 2005
    #10
  11. Leif K-Brooks

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    > Hywel Jenkins wrote:
    >> Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    >>
    >>> I know of some sites where you have to submit your login details,
    >>> and then the page redirects you to a page responding only on port 2082
    >>> (CP panel for instance) or whatever... this does not 'work' here, as I
    >>> sit behind a firewall (and I don't have the permission to open any
    >>> ports on the firewall).

    >>
    >> That's a completely different issue, and there are probably reasons why
    >> you shouldn't be trying to access CPanel in that example.

    >
    > LOL. I am the owner of the website hosted by a host using CPanel. I pay
    > for the usage of it.


    If you're behind a firewall without permission to open ports, then you are
    almost certainly at work/school, and operating that website via their
    network may be against their policies.

    If you are running the website *for* the company/school, then the internal
    IT bod ought to be able to open port 2002 to just that one IP address with
    virtually no security problems.

    If you are running the website privately, in your lunch hour, and this is
    not against your company's/school's policies, then buy your internal IT
    bod a beer at Friday lunch time, and he'll open the port for you.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Jan 27, 2005
    #11
  12. Toby Inkster wrote:
    >
    > If you are running the website privately, in your lunch hour, and this is
    > not against your company's/school's policies, then buy your internal IT
    > bod a beer at Friday lunch time, and he'll open the port for you.
    >


    okay.. I am going to reveal here our companies policies... my god. Stop
    guessing things if you don't know the circumstances. But once and for all:
    We have work in a multicompany environment. There are 4 different
    offices sharing the same infrastructures and working in a networked
    environement (human resources as well as other resources):
    (http://www.daszeichen.ch / http://www.lernetz.ch /
    http://www.adrianos.ch / http://www.optimedium.ch) We have the policy
    that our firewall is set up with the following default rules: all ports
    closed besides the standard http/ftp/mail ports. This is important as we
    have a lot of freelancers working from time to time in our offices. So
    it's a very open environment here. If I am going to use a port which is
    not opened by the firewall I have a physically isolated machine which is
    allowed to bypass the firewall.

    So now I hope the guessing will stop and you see that not everything in
    the world is not only set up according to scheme A.

    bernhard
    --
    www.daszeichen.ch
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    Bernhard Sturm, Jan 27, 2005
    #12
  13. Leif K-Brooks

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    > Toby Inkster wrote:
    >
    >> If you are running the website privately, in your lunch hour, and this is
    >> not against your company's/school's policies, then buy your internal IT
    >> bod a beer at Friday lunch time, and he'll open the port for you.

    >
    > okay.. I am going to reveal here our companies policies... my god. Stop
    > guessing things if you don't know the circumstances.


    I'm pretty sure the beer thing will still work.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Jan 27, 2005
    #13
  14. Toby Inkster wrote:
    > Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    >>
    >>okay.. I am going to reveal here our companies policies... my god. Stop
    >>guessing things if you don't know the circumstances.

    >
    >
    > I'm pretty sure the beer thing will still work.
    >


    I am the boss of the company ;-) The guy from the IT department does his
    job without being bribed with beer ;-)
    But we are drifting OT here (as we always do) cheers mate!

    --
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    Bernhard Sturm, Jan 27, 2005
    #14
  15. Leif K-Brooks

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Bernhard Sturm wrote:

    > The guy from the IT department does his job without being bribed with
    > beer ;-)


    Well, then he's missing a trick.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Jan 28, 2005
    #15
  16. Toby Inkster wrote:
    > Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The guy from the IT department does his job without being bribed with
    >>beer ;-)

    >
    >
    > Well, then he's missing a trick.
    >

    yeah a good one.

    --
    www.daszeichen.ch
    remove nixspam to reply
     
    Bernhard Sturm, Jan 28, 2005
    #16
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