Formatting strings

Discussion in 'Javascript' started by Nige, Nov 6, 2003.

  1. Nige

    Nige Guest

    I'm a complete novice to JS. I want to insert the date and time into a
    document in the format:

    WB-MMDDHHmm

    Where:

    WB- is a fixed string prefix (the whole string is a reference number)
    MM is the month 01 to 12, with a leading 0 if required
    DD is the day 01 to 31, with a leading 0 if required
    HH is the hour 00 to 23, with a leading 0 if required
    mm is the minute 00 to 59, with a leading 0 if required


    I've got this far:


    <script language="JavaScript">

    function ShowDateTime()
    {
    var today = new Date();
    var mo=today.getMonth()+1;
    var da=today.getDate();
    var ho=today.getHours();
    var mi=today.getMinutes();

    # parse here #

    document.write("WB-"+mo+da+ho+mi);
    }

    </script>


    The problem is the bit to parse the strings, I've tried

    if (mo.length < 2) mo="0"+mo; ... etc

    but it doesn't work.

    Help!
    --
    Nige

    Please replace YYYY with the current year
    ille quis mortem cum maximus ludos, vincat
     
    Nige, Nov 6, 2003
    #1
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  2. Nige wrote:

    > function ShowDateTime()
    > {
    > var today = new Date();
    > var mo=today.getMonth()+1;
    > var da=today.getDate();
    > var ho=today.getHours();
    > var mi=today.getMinutes();
    >
    > # parse here #
    >
    > document.write("WB-"+mo+da+ho+mi);
    > }
    > [...]
    >
    > The problem is the bit to parse the strings, I've tried
    >
    > if (mo.length < 2) mo="0"+mo; ... etc
    >
    > but it doesn't work.


    The Date.get...(...) methods return values of type `number'. When you assign
    them to a variable and use the lookup operator `.' with that variable, the
    value stored in that variable is converted to a Number object.
    Unfortunately, those objects do not have a `length' property, so the value
    is `undefined'. But `undefined < 2' equals `false' (as you can and should
    test with alert(...) or document.write(...)) so the second assignment to
    `mo' aso. is not executed.

    I see two possible approaches to solve the problem:

    A) Convert the number into a string. String objects have a
    length property you can compare with:

    if (String(mo).length < 2)
    ...

    B) What you need is only the leading zero for a two-digit number.
    So concatenate it only when it is needed, as the number is less
    than 10:

    if (mo < 10)
    ...

    I use and recommend to use B) since it is faster and allocates less memory.


    HTH

    PointedEars
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Nov 6, 2003
    #2
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  3. Nige

    Nige Guest

    Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    In comp.lang.javascript, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:

    >The Date.get...(...) methods return values of type `number'.


    Of course, thank you.

    I've since realized that the problem is more complex than I thought. The
    plan was to generate a reference number consisting of the date and time
    when a user submits a form.

    The reference number is created by the CGI script that processes the
    form, but (of course) if the user's clock is not the same as the server
    then the numbers are different. D'OH!

    Is there a way to generate a string referencing the current date and
    time (as MMDDHHmm) when a user presses the Submit button, send this
    string with the other form data, then display this string on the page
    that is displayed next?



    --
    Nige

    Please replace YYYY with the current year
    ille quis mortem cum maximus ludos, vincat
     
    Nige, Nov 6, 2003
    #3
  4. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    Nige wrote:

    > I've since realized that the problem is more complex than I thought. The
    > plan was to generate a reference number consisting of the date and time
    > when a user submits a form.
    >
    > The reference number is created by the CGI script that processes the
    > form, but (of course) if the user's clock is not the same as the server
    > then the numbers are different. D'OH!


    Null problemo. You should never use client-side data when server-side data
    is more reliable. Did you think of timezones and stuff like that? Use the
    server time for generating the reference number which also frees you from
    dependence of client-side JavaScript support and unreliable techniques (like
    changing the value of an `input' element on submit which could, but should
    not be done here.)


    PointedEars

    P.S.
    Please don't change the Subject unless there is really a change of subject.
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Nov 6, 2003
    #4
  5. Nige

    Nige Guest

    Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    In comp.lang.javascript, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:

    >Use the server time for generating the reference number


    I don't know how to make the CGI script send a value to the next page.



    --
    Nige

    Please replace YYYY with the current year
    ille quis mortem cum maximus ludos, vincat
     
    Nige, Nov 6, 2003
    #5
  6. Nige

    Nige Guest

    Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    In comp.lang.javascript, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:

    >You should never use client-side data when server-side data
    >is more reliable.


    Time zones don't enter into it, all users are in the UK. All I really
    need is a reference number that gives the date and approx time, it
    doesn't even have to be unique, but the user must be shown the same
    number that I get sent by the CGI.

    As I said in my other post (which I sent without giving full details,
    sorry), I can't send the CGI data to the next page. So the simple option
    (assuming it is simple) is the generate a string on the form page, send
    it with the CGI data, and display it on the following page.

    Can it be done?


    --
    Nige

    Please replace YYYY with the current year
    ille quis mortem cum maximus ludos, vincat
     
    Nige, Nov 6, 2003
    #6
  7. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    Nige wrote:

    > In comp.lang.javascript, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
    >>Use the server time for generating the reference number

    >
    > I don't know how to make the CGI script send a value to the next page.


    This is off-topic here (since it has nothing to do with JavaScript)
    but what kind of CGI script are you talking about?


    PointedEars

    P.S.
    Don't expect people to manipulate the `To' when they send you e-mail.
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Nov 6, 2003
    #7
  8. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    HikksNotAtHome wrote:

    > In article <boe2s6$1dth52$-berlin.de>, Thomas 'PointedEars'
    > Lahn <> writes:


    ....

    >>Nige wrote:
    >>> In comp.lang.javascript, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
    >>>>Use the server time for generating the reference number
    >>>
    >>> I don't know how to make the CGI script send a value to the next page.

    >>
    >> This is off-topic here (since it has nothing to do with JavaScript)
    >> but what kind of CGI script are you talking about?

    >
    > Server Side Javascript potentially running as a CGI is off-topic in a
    > Javascript newsgroup?


    Of course not, but nothing was said about server-side JavaScript and I
    assumed that the OP did not wrote about server-side JavaScript because
    he distiguished CGI from that (which is incorrect, though.)

    >>P.S.
    >>Don't expect people to manipulate the `To' when they send you e-mail.

    >
    > Dont try to email people from a group and its a non-issue. Post to news, get
    > answered in news, and theres no problem.


    Usenet is public newsgroups *and* private (e-)mail (PM), at least because
    it is obvious that some things do not belong into newsgroups but are better
    to be written via e-mail than not written at all (as the Netiquette
    recommends.) I'm sorry for you that you are not aware of this, but that
    is your problem, not mine.


    EOD

    PointedEars
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Nov 6, 2003
    #8
  9. JRS: In article <>, seen in
    news:comp.lang.javascript, Nige <> posted at Thu, 6
    Nov 2003 16:29:26 :-

    >function ShowDateTime()
    >{
    > var today = new Date();
    > var mo=today.getMonth()+1;
    > var da=today.getDate();
    > var ho=today.getHours();
    > var mi=today.getMinutes();
    >
    ># parse here #
    >
    > document.write("WB-"+mo+da+ho+mi);



    >The problem is the bit to parse the strings,



    Perhaps you have not read _all_ that the FAQ has to say; see signature
    below.

    You do not want to parse them, but to format them

    function LZ(x) {return(x<0||x>9?"":"0")+x} // add leading 0

    document.write("WB-" + LZ(mo) + LZ(da) + LZ(ho) + LZ(mi));


    --
    © John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 IE 4 ©
    <URL:http://jibbering.com/faq/> Jim Ley's FAQ for news:comp.lang.javascript
    <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htm> JS maths, dates, sources.
    <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> TP/BP/Delphi/JS/&c., FAQ topics, links.
     
    Dr John Stockton, Nov 6, 2003
    #9
  10. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    HikksNotAtHome wrote:
    > I have no problem with it. I dont recieve the mails (If I do, they get
    > deleted), so I fail to see how Usenet is a "private" place. As I said, don't
    > try to email someone, no problems. Trying to get outside of the public Usenet
    > into private Email is crossing a boundary that I don't care to cross. It opens
    > up too many problems. If the "Netiquette" says its ok, I don't care, I don't do
    > it and I won't do it.


    *PLONK*
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Nov 7, 2003
    #10
  11. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    Nige wrote:

    > In comp.lang.javascript, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
    >>You should never use client-side data when server-side data
    >>is more reliable.

    >
    > Time zones don't enter into it, all users are in the UK.


    I wonder how you can be sure.

    > All I really need is a reference number that gives the date and approx
    > time, it doesn't even have to be unique, but the user must be shown the
    > same number that I get sent by the CGI.


    Why, you don't need JavaScript for this (unless your CGI application uses
    server-side JavaScript.) Let the CGI application generate the reference
    number. Here is it in PHP (untested):

    <input type="text" value="<?php
    echo date('mdHi', time());
    ?>">

    > As I said in my other post (which I sent without giving full details,
    > sorry), I can't send the CGI data to the next page.


    Could you please explain why you assume this is the case?

    > So the simple option (assuming it is simple) is the generate a string
    > on the form page, send it with the CGI data, and display it on the
    > following page.


    I think the problem is that we mean different things by "CGI data".
    However, as written before, use

    <input type="hidden" value="">

    and manipulate the value on submit. But the user will then not *see* what
    the reference number is, at least not in the form, since it is generated
    on submit and not on form generation/display. If you want to the latter
    *and* a client-side solution, you need to write the `input' element
    dynamically, while using `text' for the value of its `type' attribute:

    <script type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript">
    <!--
    function getReferenceNumber()
    {
    var
    d = new Date(),
    iMonth = d.getMonth() + 1,
    iDay = d.getDay(),
    iHours = d.getHours(),
    iMins = d.getMinutes();

    return (
    (iMonth < 10 ? "0" : "") + iMonth
    + (iDay < 10 ? "0" : "") + iDay
    + (iHours < 10 ? "0" : "") + iHours
    + (iMins < 10 ? "0" : "") + iMins)
    }

    document.write(
    '<input type="text" value="' + getReferenceNumber() + '">');
    //-->
    </script>

    The use of document.write(...) depends on the document type: In XHTML,
    AFAIK you are required to use the W3C-DOM, with its
    document.getElement...By...(...) and HTMLElement.appendChild(...) methods,
    instead.

    You could also fill the `input' element onload of the `body' element, giving
    it a name and referencing it with document.forms[...].elements[...]'. But
    users without JavaScript will then see an empty `input' element if you do
    not specify otherwise.

    > Can it be done?


    Yes, but if you choose the client-side solution and the users (customers?)
    have their JavaScript disabled or no JavaScript support at all, you will
    get no (useful) reference number at all. Dependence upon client-side
    JavaScript is a Bad Thing, unless we are talking about an Intranet with
    client-side conditions under your control or documents that cannot be
    reached other than with JavaScript support (which can be evil[tm], too!)


    HTH

    PointedEars
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Nov 7, 2003
    #11
  12. Nige

    Nige Guest

    Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    In comp.lang.javascript, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:

    >> Time zones don't enter into it, all users are in the UK.

    >I wonder how you can be sure.


    Because it is a campaign site for broadband in Kent.

    >> As I said in my other post (which I sent without giving full details,
    >> sorry), I can't send the CGI data to the next page.

    >Could you please explain why you assume this is the case?


    I've since discovered that I *can* send the date to the page, by
    following the url with a ? then the server created date string.

    My only problem now is how to extract this from the document.location
    property (it is there). I've tried code the parse the string to write
    the last 8 digits, and code to find the "?" and write the remainder.

    I think I need to have a break!


    --
    Nige

    Please replace YYYY with the current year
    ille quis mortem cum maximus ludos, vincat
     
    Nige, Nov 7, 2003
    #12
  13. Nige

    Nige Guest

    Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    In comp.lang.javascript, Nige wrote:

    >My only problem now is how to extract this from the document.location
    >property (it is there). I've tried code the parse the string to write
    >the last 8 digits, and code to find the "?" and write the remainder.
    >
    >I think I need to have a break!


    Cracked it! My JS book (O'Reilly) implies that window.location returns a
    string, but it doesn't!


    --
    Nige

    Please replace YYYY with the current year
    ille quis mortem cum maximus ludos, vincat
     
    Nige, Nov 7, 2003
    #13
  14. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    JRS: In article <>, seen in
    news:comp.lang.javascript, HikksNotAtHome <>
    posted at Thu, 6 Nov 2003 21:35:14 :-

    >I have no problem with it. I dont recieve the mails (If I do, they get
    >deleted), so I fail to see how Usenet is a "private" place. As I said, don't
    >try to email someone, no problems. Trying to get outside of the public Usenet
    >into private Email is crossing a boundary that I don't care to cross. It opens
    >up too many problems. If the "Netiquette" says its ok, I don't care, I don't do
    >it and I won't do it.



    It is possible that AOL may have problems with it; certainly they
    should. If Mr. H Ikksnot gets a couple of AOL accounts, one for use at
    work and the other at home, he may be disgruntled to receive your spam.

    One should not use an address that may cause mail to be directed to an
    account, extant or otherwise, that one does not have positive permission
    to use.

    Different providers, however, do actually state different, or no,
    conditions; presumably depending on a combination of their corporate
    intelligence and public-spiritedness.

    It is possible that AOL may have created, or be willing to create, some
    range or ranges of left parts that will not be allowed for customers and
    can therefore be offered for your purpose; they would then probably
    arrange to bounce or dump all messages to that range efficiently.

    --
    © John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 MIME ©
    Web <URL:http://www.uwasa.fi/~ts/http/tsfaq.html> -> Timo Salmi: Usenet Q&A.
    Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/news-use.htm> : about usage of News.
    No Encoding. Quotes before replies. Snip well. Write clearly. Don't Mail News.
     
    Dr John Stockton, Nov 7, 2003
    #14
  15. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    Nige wrote:
    > In comp.lang.javascript, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
    >>> As I said in my other post (which I sent without giving full details,
    >>> sorry), I can't send the CGI data to the next page.

    >>Could you please explain why you assume this is the case?

    >
    > I've since discovered that I *can* send the date to the page, by
    > following the url with a ? then the server created date string.


    Yes, that is called a HTTP GET request which
    is also the default for submitting a form.

    > My only problem now is how to extract this from the document.location
    > property (it is there). I've tried code the parse the string to write
    > the last 8 digits, and code to find the "?" and write the remainder.


    That has nothing to do with CGI as you have told before!
    However, I have written a prototype that can be useful here:

    http://pointedears.de.vu/scripts/search.htm

    Note that the documentation is a bit out of date (see the source code in the
    ..js file.) `TValue' was changed to `Value', `TSearchStr' to `SearchString',
    and enhanced.js is now deprecated; use string.js instead. (Please also
    excuse that I wrote `class' in the comments in those days -- it'll be
    changed :)).


    PointedEars
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Nov 7, 2003
    #15
  16. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    Nige wrote:

    > Cracked it! My JS book (O'Reilly) implies that window.location returns a
    > string, but it doesn't!


    (window.)location is in recent user agents a string value *and* an
    object with properties like `href', `protocol', `path', `hash' aso.

    Here, in Mozilla/5.0 rv:1.5 and IE 6.0 SP-1, it is. Which user-agent
    are you testing with?


    PointedEars
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Nov 7, 2003
    #16
  17. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn <> writes:

    > (window.)location is in recent user agents a string value *and* an
    > object with properties like `href', `protocol', `path', `hash' aso.


    > Here, in Mozilla/5.0 rv:1.5 and IE 6.0 SP-1, it is. Which user-agent
    > are you testing with?


    In my IE6, it is only an object. It doesn't have the methods from
    String.prototype (e.g., charAt), and its typeof is "object".

    If you convert it to a string, either with String(location),
    location.toString() or ""+location, the resulting string contains
    the URL, but that just means that it can be converted to a string.

    There is some magic to the location object, though, since *assigning*
    to it will really assign to location.href.

    As a curiosity, in Opera 7 the location.valueOf method is the same
    as the location.toString.

    /L
    --
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen -
    DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
    'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
     
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen, Nov 7, 2003
    #17
  18. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen wrote:

    > Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn <> writes:
    >> (window.)location is in recent user agents a string value *and* an
    >> object with properties like `href', `protocol', `path', `hash' aso.

    >
    >> Here, in Mozilla/5.0 rv:1.5 and IE 6.0 SP-1, it is. Which user-agent
    >> are you testing with?

    >
    > In my IE6, it is only an object. It doesn't have the methods from
    > String.prototype (e.g., charAt), and its typeof is "object".


    You're right, the same goes for my UAs. What I meant was that
    it returns also a URI string (due to its toString() method) in
    the right context.

    In contrast, in older UAs like Opera 6 (IIRC), `location' stores
    only a primitive string value.

    > If you convert it to a string, either with String(location),
    > location.toString() or ""+location, the resulting string contains
    > the URL, but that just means that it can be converted to a string.


    ACK

    > There is some magic to the location object, though, since *assigning*
    > to it will really assign to location.href.


    There is no magic involved :) See
    http://devedge.netscape.com/library/manuals/2000/javascript/1.3/reference/location.html


    > As a curiosity, in Opera 7 the location.valueOf method is the same
    > as the location.toString.


    Same in Mozilla/5.0 and IE 6.0 SP-1, as expected.


    PointedEars
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Nov 7, 2003
    #18
  19. Re: Formatting strings - more complex!

    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn <> writes:

    > In contrast, in older UAs like Opera 6 (IIRC), `location' stores
    > only a primitive string value.


    YRI (You Remember Incorrectly :)
    In Opera 4, 5 and 6, location is an object. I don't have Opera 3 installed,
    and Opera 2 doesn't support Javascript.

    The same goes for Netscape 4 and 3. You have to go back to Netscape 2
    to find a location property that is a plain string.

    > > There is some magic to the location object, though, since *assigning*
    > > to it will really assign to location.href.

    >
    > There is no magic involved :) See
    > http://devedge.netscape.com/library/manuals/2000/javascript/1.3/reference/location.html


    Tha qualified as "magic" to me (something that depends on internal
    code and cannot be implemented by a Javscript programmer, like the
    array length property [1]).

    It says:
    ---
    If you assign a string to the location property of an object,
    JavaScript creates a location object and assigns that string to its
    href property.
    ---
    That is not correct for *any* object. The following gives me "string":
    ---
    var x = {}; // or var x=document.body;
    x.location = "foo";
    typeof x.location
    ---
    So, it is only for window objects, not any object.

    > > As a curiosity, in Opera 7 the location.valueOf method is the same
    > > as the location.toString.

    >
    > Same in Mozilla/5.0 and IE 6.0 SP-1, as expected.


    In my IE 6, the location object doesn't have a valueOf property.
    What I mean is that in Opera is the *exact* same function, it doesn't
    just give the same result. That is:
    location.toString == location.valueOf
    and
    location.valueOf.toString()
    gives
    ---
    function toString() {
    [native code]
    }
    ---

    /L
    [1] I know Netscape 4 and Mozilla have ways to make getters and setters
    for properties, but that is not portable Javascript.
    --
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen -
    DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
    'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
     
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen, Nov 7, 2003
    #19
  20. Location object (was: Formatting strings - more complex!)

    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen wrote:

    > Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn <> writes:
    >> In contrast, in older UAs like Opera 6 (IIRC), `location' stores
    >> only a primitive string value.

    >
    > YRI (You Remember Incorrectly :)


    Having just installed Opera 6.0 again [1], I realize that you are both
    right *and* wrong! :)

    I remembered correctly, *but* my testing method was in fact flawed:
    From the fact that Opera's `location' shows no properties when iterating
    through them with `for (var p in location)', I falsely concluded that it
    has none and is therefore no object at all.[2] But as you wrote, it is of
    type `object' and has at least `href', `search' and `protocol' properties
    (when I think about it, Opera won't have distributed this much if it had not.)

    Because you cannot rely on what iteration shows, is there a way to get
    all properties of an object other than brute force, and if that, how it
    is done?

    > In Opera 4, 5 and 6, location is an object.


    It is in v6, and most certainly is in v4 and v5.

    > I don't have Opera 3 installed,


    See [1].

    > The same goes for Netscape 4 and 3.


    ACK

    >> > There is some magic to the location object, though, since *assigning*
    >> > to it will really assign to location.href.

    >>
    >> There is no magic involved :) See
    >> http://devedge.netscape.com/library/manuals/2000/javascript/1.3/reference/location.html

    >
    > Tha qualified as "magic" to me (something that depends on internal
    > code and cannot be implemented by a Javscript programmer,


    OK. I don't consider things described in specifications "magic".

    > It says:
    > ---
    > If you assign a string to the location property of an object,
    > JavaScript creates a location object and assigns that string to its
    > href property.
    > ---
    > That is not correct for *any* object. The following gives me "string":
    > ---
    > var x = {}; // or var x=document.body;
    > x.location = "foo";
    > typeof x.location
    > ---
    > So, it is only for window objects, not any object.


    It also says:

    | The location object is contained by the window object and is within its
    | scope. If you refer to a location object without specifying a window, the
    | location object represents the current location. If you refer to a
    | location object and specify a window name, as in windowReference.location,
    | the location object represents the location of the specified window.

    and BTW, your `x' is not a Location object.

    >> > As a curiosity, in Opera 7 the location.valueOf method is the same
    >> > as the location.toString.

    >>
    >> Same in Mozilla/5.0 and IE 6.0 SP-1, as expected.

    >
    > In my IE 6, the location object doesn't have a valueOf property.


    Oops! Me too. Debug bug. System halted.


    PointedEars
    ___________
    [1] <http://arc.opera.com/pub/opera/>
    [2] <http://pointedears.de.vu/scripts/test/location.html>
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Nov 7, 2003
    #20
    1. Advertising

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