Free C++compilers for a classroom

Discussion in 'C++' started by john, Sep 22, 2007.

  1. john

    john Guest

    Hi, is there any suggestion for free compiler/IDE under Windows for
    teaching C++ in a classroom?

    I am thinking Dev-C++ 4.9.9.2 on top of mingw version 3.4.5, I have also
    downloaded cygwin, but I want a user friendly IDE for Windows with an
    uptodate C++ compatible compiler.


    Any other ideas?
     
    john, Sep 22, 2007
    #1
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  2. * john:
    > Hi, is there any suggestion for free compiler/IDE under Windows for
    > teaching C++ in a classroom?
    >
    > I am thinking Dev-C++ 4.9.9.2 on top of mingw version 3.4.5, I have also
    > downloaded cygwin, but I want a user friendly IDE for Windows with an
    > uptodate C++ compatible compiler.


    Check out the CodeBlocks IDE for g++ (you might also think about the
    Eclipse IDE with C++ add-on, but based on checking it out a few years
    ago, and reports here in clc++ about difficulties, perhaps ungood).

    I didn't know we're up to MingW 3.4.5, I guess it's time to update from
    3.4.4.

    Anyway, the Rolls Royce free environment is Microsoft's Visual Express
    with Visual C++ 8.0. Not that I use it myself, I'm happy with Visual
    Studio.NET 2003, and as regards the IDE, was even happier with DevStudio
    6.0 (at least it did what you /told/ it to)... I'm guessing that if you
    don't choose that, your students will anyway, and then will complain
    about the primitive not-so-shiny thing they're forced to use in classes;
    in particular, student will appreciate the wondrous state-of-ze-art
    simply the bestest debugger, assuming it's part of the free version.


    Cheers, & hth.,

    - Alf

    --
    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is it such a bad thing?
    A: Top-posting.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Sep 22, 2007
    #2
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  3. Hello,

    On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 00:49:57 +0300, john wrote:

    > Hi, is there any suggestion for free compiler/IDE under Windows for
    > teaching C++ in a classroom?
    >
    > I am thinking Dev-C++ 4.9.9.2 on top of mingw version 3.4.5, I have also
    > downloaded cygwin, but I want a user friendly IDE for Windows with an
    > uptodate C++ compatible compiler.
    >
    >
    > Any other ideas?


    I think Dev-CPP is too outdated. It's a nice tool and I have used it
    throughout college myself, but it seems it has not been updated for some
    time now. As an IDE it's missing some features I like and most starting
    programmers would also like making programming easier and more fun.

    Now, the best C++ compiler is still g++ in my opinion, so Cygwin would be
    an option. The downside is the "difficult" build process.

    Depending on the strictness and difficulty of the courses I would advise
    you to use Visual C++ Express Edition 2005 (free Visual Studio version).
    It has almost all the benefits of the wonderful Visual Studio IDE and has
    a pretty good and up-to-date C++ compiler. Excellent for a beginner.
    I myself use Visual Studio at work every day, mainly developing C++
    applications without using MS Windows specific calls and functionality
    and it works very well.
    Given most students most likely run MS Windows at home this free version
    does not require much knowledge and experience to install and to start
    programming with.

    - Jensen
     
    Jensen Somers, Sep 22, 2007
    #3
  4. On 2007-09-22 23:49, john wrote:
    > Hi, is there any suggestion for free compiler/IDE under Windows for
    > teaching C++ in a classroom?
    >
    > I am thinking Dev-C++ 4.9.9.2 on top of mingw version 3.4.5, I have also
    > downloaded cygwin, but I want a user friendly IDE for Windows with an
    > uptodate C++ compatible compiler.


    Visual C++ 2005 Express, it is one of the most standards compliant
    compilers available (not that a recent gcc is not compliant) if you just
    use the right settings; make sure to tell you students how to set it up
    for C++ and not C++/CLR. I recommend it because I think it is a superior
    IDE, especially the debugger. It also comes with extensive help files.

    --
    Erik Wikström
     
    =?UTF-8?B?RXJpayBXaWtzdHLDtm0=?=, Sep 22, 2007
    #4
  5. john

    BobR Guest

    john <> wrote in message...
    > Hi, is there any suggestion for free compiler/IDE under Windows for
    > teaching C++ in a classroom?
    >
    > I am thinking Dev-C++ 4.9.9.2 on top of mingw version 3.4.5, I have also
    > downloaded cygwin, but I want a user friendly IDE for Windows with an
    > uptodate C++ compatible compiler.
    >
    > Any other ideas?


    Sounds good to me.

    You might take a look at MinGW Studio for a simpler IDE (and has a GNU/Linux
    port).
    MinGWStudio http://www.parinyasoft.com/
    [ easily tied to the MinGW installed with Dev-C++, or ?]

    or:
    Code::Blocks http://www.codeblocks.org/
    [ I haven't tried it, but heard good things.]

    --
    Bob R
    POVrookie
     
    BobR, Sep 22, 2007
    #5
  6. Erik Wikström wrote:
    > On 2007-09-22 23:49, john wrote:
    >> Hi, is there any suggestion for free compiler/IDE under Windows for
    >> teaching C++ in a classroom?
    >>
    >> I am thinking Dev-C++ 4.9.9.2 on top of mingw version 3.4.5, I have also
    >> downloaded cygwin, but I want a user friendly IDE for Windows with an
    >> uptodate C++ compatible compiler.

    >
    > Visual C++ 2005 Express, it is one of the most standards compliant
    > compilers available (not that a recent gcc is not compliant) if you just
    > use the right settings; make sure to tell you students how to set it up
    > for C++ and not C++/CLR. I recommend it because I think it is a superior
    > IDE, especially the debugger. It also comes with extensive help files.
    >


    I like netbeans w/ the c++ extensions. It's also cross platform if
    that's a concern.
     
    Kuberan Naganathan, Sep 23, 2007
    #6
  7. On Sep 22, 6:18 pm, Jensen Somers <> wrote:
    > Depending on the strictness and difficulty of the courses I would advise
    > you to use Visual C++ Express Edition 2005 (free Visual Studio version).
    > It has almost all the benefits of the wonderful Visual Studio IDE and has
    > a pretty good and up-to-date C++ compiler. Excellent for a beginner.
    > I myself use Visual Studio at work every day, mainly developing C++
    > applications without using MS Windows specific calls and functionality
    > and it works very well.


    Agreed. Installing it as well as the SDKs can be slightly painful due
    to the bulk of the IDE, but it is the standard development environment
    for Windows.

    Of course, I prefer a Unix-style/Cygwin build environment to that any
    day...
     
    Ambush Commander, Sep 23, 2007
    #7
  8. john

    shailesh Guest

    On Sep 22, 7:59 pm, Ambush Commander <>
    wrote:
    > On Sep 22, 6:18 pm, Jensen Somers <> wrote:
    >
    > > Depending on the strictness and difficulty of the courses I would advise
    > > you to use Visual C++ Express Edition 2005 (free Visual Studio version).
    > > It has almost all the benefits of the wonderful Visual Studio IDE and has
    > > a pretty good and up-to-date C++ compiler. Excellent for a beginner.
    > > I myself use Visual Studio at work every day, mainly developing C++
    > > applications without using MS Windows specific calls and functionality
    > > and it works very well.

    >
    > Agreed. Installing it as well as the SDKs can be slightly painful due
    > to the bulk of the IDE, but it is the standard development environment
    > for Windows.
    >
    > Of course, I prefer a Unix-style/Cygwin build environment to that any
    > day...


    My vote for Visual C++ Express Edition ... Much of the professional C+
    + development on Windows uses VC++ IDE. And since Express edition is
    free, it should be a good choice.
     
    shailesh, Sep 23, 2007
    #8
  9. john

    john Guest

    Jensen Somers wrote:
    >
    > I think Dev-CPP is too outdated. It's a nice tool and I have used it
    > throughout college myself, but it seems it has not been updated for some
    > time now. As an IDE it's missing some features I like and most starting
    > programmers would also like making programming easier and more fun.
    >
    > Now, the best C++ compiler is still g++ in my opinion, so Cygwin would be
    > an option. The downside is the "difficult" build process.
    >
    > Depending on the strictness and difficulty of the courses I would advise
    > you to use Visual C++ Express Edition 2005 (free Visual Studio version).
    > It has almost all the benefits of the wonderful Visual Studio IDE and has
    > a pretty good and up-to-date C++ compiler. Excellent for a beginner.
    > I myself use Visual Studio at work every day, mainly developing C++
    > applications without using MS Windows specific calls and functionality
    > and it works very well.
    > Given most students most likely run MS Windows at home this free version
    > does not require much knowledge and experience to install and to start
    > programming with.


    I checked Visual C++ 2005 Express, but I think it requires much steps
    for learning ISO C++ programming. You have got to create a Win32 Console
    project and erase the tmain() and #include "stdafx.h", and create your
    ISO C++ program. I think it isn't convenient for learning ISO C++. I
    think VC++/VS is mainly suited for real already programmers to create
    real world system-specific .NET/Win32 applications, as opposed to
    students learning ISO C++ programming.

    So far from what I have tested, I think Dev-C++ with the latest MinGW
    and perhaps DJGPP with RHIDE are more suited for ISO C++ beginners.
     
    john, Sep 24, 2007
    #9
  10. * john:
    > Jensen Somers wrote:
    >>
    >> I think Dev-CPP is too outdated. It's a nice tool and I have used it
    >> throughout college myself, but it seems it has not been updated for
    >> some time now. As an IDE it's missing some features I like and most
    >> starting programmers would also like making programming easier and
    >> more fun.
    >>
    >> Now, the best C++ compiler is still g++ in my opinion, so Cygwin would
    >> be an option. The downside is the "difficult" build process.
    >>
    >> Depending on the strictness and difficulty of the courses I would
    >> advise you to use Visual C++ Express Edition 2005 (free Visual Studio
    >> version). It has almost all the benefits of the wonderful Visual
    >> Studio IDE and has a pretty good and up-to-date C++ compiler.
    >> Excellent for a beginner.
    >> I myself use Visual Studio at work every day, mainly developing C++
    >> applications without using MS Windows specific calls and functionality
    >> and it works very well.
    >> Given most students most likely run MS Windows at home this free
    >> version does not require much knowledge and experience to install and
    >> to start programming with.

    >
    > I checked Visual C++ 2005 Express, but I think it requires much steps
    > for learning ISO C++ programming. You have got to create a Win32 Console
    > project and erase the tmain() and #include "stdafx.h", and create your
    > ISO C++ program. I think it isn't convenient for learning ISO C++. I
    > think VC++/VS is mainly suited for real already programmers to create
    > real world system-specific .NET/Win32 applications, as opposed to
    > students learning ISO C++ programming.


    I don't have Visual C++ 2005 Express, but surely it's possible to create
    an empty project. Also, surely it's still possible to create a GUI
    program project. Finally, learning to use the tools is necessary anyway.


    > So far from what I have tested, I think Dev-C++ with the latest MinGW
    > and perhaps DJGPP with RHIDE are more suited for ISO C++ beginners.


    I had to look up DJGPP and RHIDE in Wikipedia. :)

    Cheers,

    - Alf

    --
    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is it such a bad thing?
    A: Top-posting.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Sep 24, 2007
    #10
  11. john

    Mark P Guest

    Alf P. Steinbach wrote:
    > * john:
    >>
    >> I checked Visual C++ 2005 Express, but I think it requires much steps
    >> for learning ISO C++ programming. You have got to create a Win32
    >> Console project and erase the tmain() and #include "stdafx.h", and
    >> create your ISO C++ program. I think it isn't convenient for learning
    >> ISO C++. I think VC++/VS is mainly suited for real already programmers
    >> to create real world system-specific .NET/Win32 applications, as
    >> opposed to students learning ISO C++ programming.

    >
    > I don't have Visual C++ 2005 Express, but surely it's possible to create
    > an empty project.


    Indeed it is. It's called "Empty Project" and it's one of the options
    under New Project.

    VC++ is a nice IDE (far better than Dev-C++, IMO), includes a good
    debugger, and while it may take a few minutes to figure out where things
    are in the menus and options, is actually quite easy to use.

    I happen to like emacs because I work on a Linux system, but for Windows
    I don't know of a better and easier way to get started.

    -Mark
     
    Mark P, Sep 24, 2007
    #11
  12. On 2007-09-24 23:19, john wrote:
    > Jensen Somers wrote:
    >>
    >> I think Dev-CPP is too outdated. It's a nice tool and I have used it
    >> throughout college myself, but it seems it has not been updated for some
    >> time now. As an IDE it's missing some features I like and most starting
    >> programmers would also like making programming easier and more fun.
    >>
    >> Now, the best C++ compiler is still g++ in my opinion, so Cygwin would be
    >> an option. The downside is the "difficult" build process.
    >>
    >> Depending on the strictness and difficulty of the courses I would advise
    >> you to use Visual C++ Express Edition 2005 (free Visual Studio version).
    >> It has almost all the benefits of the wonderful Visual Studio IDE and has
    >> a pretty good and up-to-date C++ compiler. Excellent for a beginner.
    >> I myself use Visual Studio at work every day, mainly developing C++
    >> applications without using MS Windows specific calls and functionality
    >> and it works very well.
    >> Given most students most likely run MS Windows at home this free version
    >> does not require much knowledge and experience to install and to start
    >> programming with.

    >
    > I checked Visual C++ 2005 Express, but I think it requires much steps
    > for learning ISO C++ programming. You have got to create a Win32 Console
    > project and erase the tmain() and #include "stdafx.h", and create your
    > ISO C++ program. I think it isn't convenient for learning ISO C++. I
    > think VC++/VS is mainly suited for real already programmers to create
    > real world system-specific .NET/Win32 applications, as opposed to
    > students learning ISO C++ programming.


    You should create an empty project, add a source-file and then write the
    code in that, it might also be a good idea, but not necessary, to
    disable the VC++ specific extensions (all that is needed is to change
    one option).

    --
    Erik Wikström
     
    =?UTF-8?B?RXJpayBXaWtzdHLDtm0=?=, Sep 25, 2007
    #12
  13. john

    Duane Hebert Guest

    "john" <> wrote in message news:1190668770.541490@athprx04...
    > Jensen Somers wrote:


    > I checked Visual C++ 2005 Express, but I think it requires much steps for
    > learning ISO C++ programming. You have got to create a Win32 Console
    > project and erase the tmain() and #include "stdafx.h", and create your ISO
    > C++ program. I think it isn't convenient for learning ISO C++. I think
    > VC++/VS is mainly suited for real already programmers to create real world
    > system-specific .NET/Win32 applications, as opposed to students learning
    > ISO C++ programming.


    select all and replace with int main() {}


    > So far from what I have tested, I think Dev-C++ with the latest MinGW and
    > perhaps DJGPP with RHIDE are more suited for ISO C++ beginners.


    Last time I tried djgpp it was pretty difficult to configure and the
    debugging
    was lousy. Has something changed recently?

    I would prefer to be forced to create my own main() and have a good
    debugger.
     
    Duane Hebert, Sep 25, 2007
    #13
  14. john

    James Kanze Guest

    On Sep 23, 12:14 am, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    > * john:


    [...]
    > Anyway, the Rolls Royce free environment is Microsoft's Visual Express
    > with Visual C++ 8.0.


    I guess it depends. I found the IDE with the free version of
    VC++ 8 pretty unusable. But then, I've found most IDE's pretty
    unusable; they get in the way more than they help. I can
    imagine for a beginner, however, they do mean that he can start
    producing and testing code faster, with a lot less other stuff
    to learn. (He'll have to learn it later, of course.)

    > Not that I use it myself, I'm happy with Visual
    > Studio.NET 2003, and as regards the IDE, was even happier with DevStudio
    > 6.0 (at least it did what you /told/ it to)... I'm guessing that if you
    > don't choose that, your students will anyway, and then will complain
    > about the primitive not-so-shiny thing they're forced to use in classes;
    > in particular, student will appreciate the wondrous state-of-ze-art
    > simply the bestest debugger, assuming it's part of the free version.


    Presumably, as they're students, they're not allowed to use a
    debugger.

    --
    James Kanze (GABI Software) email:
    Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
    Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
    9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
     
    James Kanze, Sep 25, 2007
    #14
  15. john

    DJ Guest

    john napisał(a):
    > Hi, is there any suggestion for free compiler/IDE under Windows for
    > teaching C++ in a classroom?
    >
    > I am thinking Dev-C++ 4.9.9.2 on top of mingw version 3.4.5, I have also
    > downloaded cygwin, but I want a user friendly IDE for Windows with an
    > uptodate C++ compatible compiler.


    emacs, gmake, g++ and you have the best tools set ever :) what else to
    you need ?
     
    DJ, Sep 25, 2007
    #15
  16. john

    arnuld Guest

    > On Tue, 25 Sep 2007 11:30:52 +0200, DJ wrote:

    > emacs, gmake, g++ and you have the best tools set ever :) what else to
    > you need ?


    very good answer :)


    --
    http://lispmachine.wordpress.com
     
    arnuld, Sep 25, 2007
    #16
  17. * James Kanze:
    >
    > Presumably, as they're students, they're not allowed to use a
    > debugger.


    It seems you mean: it's almost a given that a modern learning
    institution forbids the students learning anything about the craft
    they're supposed to learn.

    Well, I don't think they forbid learning.


    Cheers,

    - Alf

    --
    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is it such a bad thing?
    A: Top-posting.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Sep 25, 2007
    #17
  18. john

    Shadowman Guest

    James Kanze wrote:
    > On Sep 23, 12:14 am, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    >> * john:

    >
    > [...]
    >> Anyway, the Rolls Royce free environment is Microsoft's Visual Express
    >> with Visual C++ 8.0.

    >
    > I guess it depends. I found the IDE with the free version of
    > VC++ 8 pretty unusable. But then, I've found most IDE's pretty
    > unusable; they get in the way more than they help. I can
    > imagine for a beginner, however, they do mean that he can start
    > producing and testing code faster, with a lot less other stuff
    > to learn. (He'll have to learn it later, of course.)
    >
    >> Not that I use it myself, I'm happy with Visual
    >> Studio.NET 2003, and as regards the IDE, was even happier with DevStudio
    >> 6.0 (at least it did what you /told/ it to)... I'm guessing that if you
    >> don't choose that, your students will anyway, and then will complain
    >> about the primitive not-so-shiny thing they're forced to use in classes;
    >> in particular, student will appreciate the wondrous state-of-ze-art
    >> simply the bestest debugger, assuming it's part of the free version.

    >
    > Presumably, as they're students, they're not allowed to use a
    > debugger.
    >

    Huh? I don't think there was any rule against using a debugger when I
    was in college. Although I never actually used one until later when I
    was out in the world. I had enough trouble trying to figure out the
    compiler and makefiles :)

    That said, I think a debugger might actually be a helpful learning tool
    for students. It certainly wouldn't constitute cheating, by any means.

    --
    SM
    rot13 for email
     
    Shadowman, Sep 25, 2007
    #18
  19. john

    Phlip Guest

    duane hebert wrote:

    > Unfortunately gdb was the only one available on the
    > school's systems.  The profs got pretty tired of trying to explain
    > how to use it <g>


    A> ddd

    B> unit tests

    --
    Phlip
     
    Phlip, Sep 25, 2007
    #19
  20. john

    duane hebert Guest

    >> Presumably, as they're students, they're not allowed to use a
    >> debugger.
    >>

    > Huh? I don't think there was any rule against using a debugger when I was
    > in college. Although I never actually used one until later when I was
    > out in the world. I had enough trouble trying to figure out the compiler
    > and makefiles :)
    >
    > That said, I think a debugger might actually be a helpful learning tool
    > for students. It certainly wouldn't constitute cheating, by any means.


    I wish a few of our new guys has some better debugging
    experience. FWIW in school we were allowed debugging tools
    if we wanted. Unfortunately gdb was the only one available on the
    school's systems. The profs got pretty tired of trying to explain
    how to use it <g>
     
    duane hebert, Sep 25, 2007
    #20
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