FreeRIDE vs Rails

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Phlip, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. Phlip

    Phlip Guest

    Rubies:

    A perfectly factored program always has methods that are only 2 or 3
    lines long, each in a file with only two or three methods.

    This means, with a well-factored system like Rails, you have to
    rapidly navigate between various points in various files, to get
    anything done. Navigation becomes one of the biggest developmental
    burdens.

    So how close is FreeRIDE to these features?

    - bookmark any location
    - cycle between bookmarks _between_ files
    - find-in-all-files
    - find-in-all-open-files

    Note that "find in all files" does not mean the way Textmate does it.
    That application simply invokes a "grep" system, then dumps its
    results into a popup window. This then requires a lot of mouse or
    keyboard abuse to navigate from find to find. A true "find-in-files"
    should work seamlessly from the existing find system.

    Has anyone started to add these features, so I can see what they did?

    --
    Phlip
    http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/9780596510657/
    ^ assert_xpath
    http://tinyurl.com/yrc77g <-- assert_latest Model
    Phlip, Aug 7, 2007
    #1
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  2. On 8/7/07, Phlip <> wrote:
    > Rubies:
    >
    > A perfectly factored program always has methods that are only 2 or 3
    > lines long, each in a file with only two or three methods.


    Says who? (especially the 2-3 methods per file thing)

    Yes, method definitions should be refactored to be short so they can
    fit in memory easily. But it irks me when people set this to n-lines.

    I much prefer the metrics of 'one concept per method' and 'a small
    amount of nesting' to just setting arbitrary number of lines and an
    arbitrary number of methods.
    Gregory Brown, Aug 7, 2007
    #2
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  3. Phlip

    James Britt Guest

    Phlip wrote:
    >
    > Has anyone started to add these features, so I can see what they did?
    >



    I'm pretty sure FreeRIDE is open source, so taking a look should be
    simple, and if you don't find the features you want, you might consider
    adding them.



    --
    James Britt

    "Simplicity of the language is not what matters, but
    simplicity of use."
    - Richard A. O'Keefe in squeak-dev mailing list
    James Britt, Aug 7, 2007
    #3
  4. Phlip

    Phlip Guest

    Phlip, Aug 7, 2007
    #4
  5. On 8/7/07, Phlip <> wrote:
    > Gregory Brown wrote:
    >
    > > > A perfectly factored program always has methods that are only 2 or 3
    > > > lines long, each in a file with only two or three methods.

    > >
    > > Says who? (especially the 2-3 methods per file thing)

    >
    > It's a joke!


    Oh. I guess I missed that :)

    Rails is a perfect example of a system that takes code separation too far. (IMO)
    Gregory Brown, Aug 7, 2007
    #5
  6. Phlip

    John Joyce Guest

    On Aug 7, 2007, at 12:32 PM, Gregory Brown wrote:

    > On 8/7/07, Phlip <> wrote:
    >> Gregory Brown wrote:
    >>
    >>>> A perfectly factored program always has methods that are only 2
    >>>> or 3
    >>>> lines long, each in a file with only two or three methods.
    >>>
    >>> Says who? (especially the 2-3 methods per file thing)

    >>
    >> It's a joke!

    >
    > Oh. I guess I missed that :)
    >
    > Rails is a perfect example of a system that takes code separation
    > too far. (IMO)
    >

    Actually, it only takes the separation as far as you ask it to.
    You can really do amazingly simple things without using most of
    what's in Rails, and yet still make something that is easier to
    maintain, by having nice places to put repeated web page elements
    (headers and footers), even if that's all you need, it works well.

    The real beauty in (IMHO) is the way it takes CGI out of your hands
    and lets you focus on making something useful.
    John Joyce, Aug 7, 2007
    #6
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