Generating forms from XML Schema

Discussion in 'XML' started by mats_trash@hotmail.com, Dec 6, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I've been doing some fairly extensive searching on this topic and have
    not yet found a solution that doesn't involve recoding the schema in
    some framework-specific xml and jumping through various other hoops.
    Is there not some
    web-2.0-framework-publishing-(non)-bells-and-whistles-technology that
    will take a valid XML Schema and create either an XForm or standard
    HTML form, publish it, and then validate the subsquent data submission
    against the Schema. In a perfect world this would be also make it easy
    to store the data in an native or XML-enabled database.

    I've looked at Cocoon for example but this requires redoing the Schemas
    in proprietary xml which I inherently dislike. Furthermore this would
    make it difficult to achieve a wider ambition of having a system where
    third party schemas could be processed on the fly for optional
    'subforms' of the main form (though these schemas would all be built
    from standard building blocks, just with different permutations and
    combinations)

    Cheers
     
    , Dec 6, 2006
    #1
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  2. Good thought, but it tends not to survive contact with the real world.

    There were many attempts at this early in the evolution of XML Schemas.
    None of them were really particularly usable/useful; schemas don't
    generally contain enough metadata about the meaning of the information
    to let you generate a really user-friendly set of forms, and so the idea
    didn't really catch on. You wind up with a much better user experience
    if you take the time to hand-implement the interaction.

    Also, forms entry doesn't deal very well with optional sections and
    recursion -- you'd need to spawn sub-forms based on interaction with the
    user, which doesn't fit neatly into the concept of a single HTML form.
    (I'm not sure whether XForm does any better in that regard.)

    There are certainly schema-directed XML editors, but they tend to be
    aimed at folks who are already near-experts in the specific schema
    they're working with and hence don't need a lot of user prompting -- or
    rely on schemas having been annotated with additional information to
    guide the user interface generation. And they rely on presenting a
    richer set of interaction techniques than a simple form can provide.

    --
    () ASCII Ribbon Campaign | Joe Kesselman
    /\ Stamp out HTML e-mail! | System architexture and kinetic poetry
     
    Joe Kesselman, Dec 6, 2006
    #2
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  3. vjbytes Guest

    Have you looked at

    http://alphaworks.ibm.com/tech/xfg

    The default submit generated is to an echo server.
    However being IBM, I would recommend storing it in DB2 9 with native
    XML :)

    thanks,
    Vijay



    wrote:
    > I've been doing some fairly extensive searching on this topic and have
    > not yet found a solution that doesn't involve recoding the schema in
    > some framework-specific xml and jumping through various other hoops.
    > Is there not some
    > web-2.0-framework-publishing-(non)-bells-and-whistles-technology that
    > will take a valid XML Schema and create either an XForm or standard
    > HTML form, publish it, and then validate the subsquent data submission
    > against the Schema. In a perfect world this would be also make it easy
    > to store the data in an native or XML-enabled database.
    >
    > I've looked at Cocoon for example but this requires redoing the Schemas
    > in proprietary xml which I inherently dislike. Furthermore this would
    > make it difficult to achieve a wider ambition of having a system where
    > third party schemas could be processed on the fly for optional
    > 'subforms' of the main form (though these schemas would all be built
    > from standard building blocks, just with different permutations and
    > combinations)
    >
    > Cheers
     
    vjbytes, Dec 12, 2006
    #3
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