Geolocation Testing

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Andy, Jul 13, 2006.

  1. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Hi guys,

    I'm currently working on a project that determines the geographical
    location of a request to our servers. I'm not sure exactly how it
    works as the geolocation functionality is coming from a package that
    we're integrating with our website. (The package actually does much
    more than just give back geographical locations, but that's irrelevant)

    Because of the nature of this project (this is for a financial
    institution), we need to test out the package before we begin
    integrating it to ensure that it's giving us the right data.

    Now, it seems that the obvious course of action would be to find
    willing employees who could "hit" the servers and then ensure that the
    data is coming back correctly, but this presents a few problems:
    - The sample size of the test will be limited to however many
    participants we have.
    - The majority of the participants reside in the same geographic area.
    - The testing servers that this code would be sitting on are behind a
    corporate intranet, and so IT would have to get involved to do some
    routing magic.

    So now the question: Do any of you know of any good software packages
    or methods to spoof the location of an incoming request or have any of
    you had to test something like this? Any hints on a workable approach?

    Thanks and regards.
    Andy
     
    Andy, Jul 13, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Andy,
    You might want to look into the Virtual Earth "location.ashx" handler that
    returns the coordinates of the browser making the request. You may have to
    search around a bit to find this. I've got some info on this in an article I
    wrote some time ago, here:

    http://www.eggheadcafe.com/articles/20051109.asp

    Peter

    --
    Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    UnBlog:
    http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com




    "Andy" wrote:

    > Hi guys,
    >
    > I'm currently working on a project that determines the geographical
    > location of a request to our servers. I'm not sure exactly how it
    > works as the geolocation functionality is coming from a package that
    > we're integrating with our website. (The package actually does much
    > more than just give back geographical locations, but that's irrelevant)
    >
    > Because of the nature of this project (this is for a financial
    > institution), we need to test out the package before we begin
    > integrating it to ensure that it's giving us the right data.
    >
    > Now, it seems that the obvious course of action would be to find
    > willing employees who could "hit" the servers and then ensure that the
    > data is coming back correctly, but this presents a few problems:
    > - The sample size of the test will be limited to however many
    > participants we have.
    > - The majority of the participants reside in the same geographic area.
    > - The testing servers that this code would be sitting on are behind a
    > corporate intranet, and so IT would have to get involved to do some
    > routing magic.
    >
    > So now the question: Do any of you know of any good software packages
    > or methods to spoof the location of an incoming request or have any of
    > you had to test something like this? Any hints on a workable approach?
    >
    > Thanks and regards.
    > Andy
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?UGV0ZXIgQnJvbWJlcmcgW0MjIE1WUF0=?=, Jul 13, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Hi Peter,

    Thanks for your response!
    I don't know if we're on the same page though; basically getting
    coordinates / locations isn't my issue, my issue is figuring out how to
    spoof http requests to the current geolocation package that we have to
    ensure that it's working correctly.

    Ideally, this would be some sort of tool that allows me to say "OK, I
    want you to access this server and request this page, and tell it
    you're from Las Vegas, Nevada" or something to that effect. I would
    then want to make sure that the geolocation package that we have says
    "Hey, I just got a request from someone in Vegas", and then continue on
    giving it different countries and whatnot.


    Peter wrote:
    > Andy,
    > You might want to look into the Virtual Earth "location.ashx" handler that
    > returns the coordinates of the browser making the request. You may have to
    > search around a bit to find this. I've got some info on this in an article I
    > wrote some time ago, here:
    >
    > http://www.eggheadcafe.com/articles/20051109.asp
    >
    > Peter
    >
    > --
    > Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    > http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    > UnBlog:
    > http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Andy" wrote:
    >
    > > Hi guys,
    > >
    > > I'm currently working on a project that determines the geographical
    > > location of a request to our servers. I'm not sure exactly how it
    > > works as the geolocation functionality is coming from a package that
    > > we're integrating with our website. (The package actually does much
    > > more than just give back geographical locations, but that's irrelevant)
    > >
    > > Because of the nature of this project (this is for a financial
    > > institution), we need to test out the package before we begin
    > > integrating it to ensure that it's giving us the right data.
    > >
    > > Now, it seems that the obvious course of action would be to find
    > > willing employees who could "hit" the servers and then ensure that the
    > > data is coming back correctly, but this presents a few problems:
    > > - The sample size of the test will be limited to however many
    > > participants we have.
    > > - The majority of the participants reside in the same geographic area.
    > > - The testing servers that this code would be sitting on are behind a
    > > corporate intranet, and so IT would have to get involved to do some
    > > routing magic.
    > >
    > > So now the question: Do any of you know of any good software packages
    > > or methods to spoof the location of an incoming request or have any of
    > > you had to test something like this? Any hints on a workable approach?
    > >
    > > Thanks and regards.
    > > Andy
    > >
    > >
     
    Andy, Jul 13, 2006
    #3
  4. Andy,
    I understand exactly what you want / need to do. What you must understand is
    that when your request comes in, the only piece of information available to
    the server that could be used for geolocation is the originating IP address.
    You can do a lookup against this in DNS and find out approximately where it
    came from.

    So how are you going to "spoof" your originating IP address?
    Peter

    --
    Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    UnBlog:
    http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com




    "Andy" wrote:

    > Hi Peter,
    >
    > Thanks for your response!
    > I don't know if we're on the same page though; basically getting
    > coordinates / locations isn't my issue, my issue is figuring out how to
    > spoof http requests to the current geolocation package that we have to
    > ensure that it's working correctly.
    >
    > Ideally, this would be some sort of tool that allows me to say "OK, I
    > want you to access this server and request this page, and tell it
    > you're from Las Vegas, Nevada" or something to that effect. I would
    > then want to make sure that the geolocation package that we have says
    > "Hey, I just got a request from someone in Vegas", and then continue on
    > giving it different countries and whatnot.
    >
    >
    > Peter wrote:
    > > Andy,
    > > You might want to look into the Virtual Earth "location.ashx" handler that
    > > returns the coordinates of the browser making the request. You may have to
    > > search around a bit to find this. I've got some info on this in an article I
    > > wrote some time ago, here:
    > >
    > > http://www.eggheadcafe.com/articles/20051109.asp
    > >
    > > Peter
    > >
    > > --
    > > Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    > > http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    > > UnBlog:
    > > http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Andy" wrote:
    > >
    > > > Hi guys,
    > > >
    > > > I'm currently working on a project that determines the geographical
    > > > location of a request to our servers. I'm not sure exactly how it
    > > > works as the geolocation functionality is coming from a package that
    > > > we're integrating with our website. (The package actually does much
    > > > more than just give back geographical locations, but that's irrelevant)
    > > >
    > > > Because of the nature of this project (this is for a financial
    > > > institution), we need to test out the package before we begin
    > > > integrating it to ensure that it's giving us the right data.
    > > >
    > > > Now, it seems that the obvious course of action would be to find
    > > > willing employees who could "hit" the servers and then ensure that the
    > > > data is coming back correctly, but this presents a few problems:
    > > > - The sample size of the test will be limited to however many
    > > > participants we have.
    > > > - The majority of the participants reside in the same geographic area.
    > > > - The testing servers that this code would be sitting on are behind a
    > > > corporate intranet, and so IT would have to get involved to do some
    > > > routing magic.
    > > >
    > > > So now the question: Do any of you know of any good software packages
    > > > or methods to spoof the location of an incoming request or have any of
    > > > you had to test something like this? Any hints on a workable approach?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks and regards.
    > > > Andy
    > > >
    > > >

    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?UGV0ZXIgQnJvbWJlcmcgW0MjIE1WUF0=?=, Jul 13, 2006
    #4
  5. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Exactly, that's the question.

    Well, let me ask you this, Peter: If I was to go out to some random
    website, DNS it and get it's IP address, if I were to just send that
    into this geolocation package sitting on a local machine, would it be
    able to tell where it is originating from geographically? That is, are
    IP addresses, though dynamically allocated, geographically fixed to
    some extent?

    Thanks again!
    Andy

    Peter wrote:
    > Andy,
    > I understand exactly what you want / need to do. What you must understand is
    > that when your request comes in, the only piece of information available to
    > the server that could be used for geolocation is the originating IP address.
    > You can do a lookup against this in DNS and find out approximately where it
    > came from.
    >
    > So how are you going to "spoof" your originating IP address?
    > Peter
    >
    > --
    > Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    > http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    > UnBlog:
    > http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Andy" wrote:
    >
    > > Hi Peter,
    > >
    > > Thanks for your response!
    > > I don't know if we're on the same page though; basically getting
    > > coordinates / locations isn't my issue, my issue is figuring out how to
    > > spoof http requests to the current geolocation package that we have to
    > > ensure that it's working correctly.
    > >
    > > Ideally, this would be some sort of tool that allows me to say "OK, I
    > > want you to access this server and request this page, and tell it
    > > you're from Las Vegas, Nevada" or something to that effect. I would
    > > then want to make sure that the geolocation package that we have says
    > > "Hey, I just got a request from someone in Vegas", and then continue on
    > > giving it different countries and whatnot.
    > >
    > >
    > > Peter wrote:
    > > > Andy,
    > > > You might want to look into the Virtual Earth "location.ashx" handler that
    > > > returns the coordinates of the browser making the request. You may have to
    > > > search around a bit to find this. I've got some info on this in an article I
    > > > wrote some time ago, here:
    > > >
    > > > http://www.eggheadcafe.com/articles/20051109.asp
    > > >
    > > > Peter
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    > > > http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    > > > UnBlog:
    > > > http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Andy" wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Hi guys,
    > > > >
    > > > > I'm currently working on a project that determines the geographical
    > > > > location of a request to our servers. I'm not sure exactly how it
    > > > > works as the geolocation functionality is coming from a package that
    > > > > we're integrating with our website. (The package actually does much
    > > > > more than just give back geographical locations, but that's irrelevant)
    > > > >
    > > > > Because of the nature of this project (this is for a financial
    > > > > institution), we need to test out the package before we begin
    > > > > integrating it to ensure that it's giving us the right data.
    > > > >
    > > > > Now, it seems that the obvious course of action would be to find
    > > > > willing employees who could "hit" the servers and then ensure that the
    > > > > data is coming back correctly, but this presents a few problems:
    > > > > - The sample size of the test will be limited to however many
    > > > > participants we have.
    > > > > - The majority of the participants reside in the same geographic area.
    > > > > - The testing servers that this code would be sitting on are behind a
    > > > > corporate intranet, and so IT would have to get involved to do some
    > > > > routing magic.
    > > > >
    > > > > So now the question: Do any of you know of any good software packages
    > > > > or methods to spoof the location of an incoming request or have any of
    > > > > you had to test something like this? Any hints on a workable approach?
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanks and regards.
    > > > > Andy
    > > > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > >
     
    Andy, Jul 13, 2006
    #5
  6. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Nevermind Peter, that question was a result of too much coffee.

    So you can't really spoof an IP address, but that is exactly what I
    would need to do in order to be able to test this out as I wanted. So
    I guess it'll just be a matter of sucking it up and trying to get some
    geographically diverse employees to test this guy out.

    Thanks again!
    Andy

    Andy wrote:
    > Exactly, that's the question.
    >
    > Well, let me ask you this, Peter: If I was to go out to some random
    > website, DNS it and get it's IP address, if I were to just send that
    > into this geolocation package sitting on a local machine, would it be
    > able to tell where it is originating from geographically? That is, are
    > IP addresses, though dynamically allocated, geographically fixed to
    > some extent?
    >
    > Thanks again!
    > Andy
    >
    > Peter wrote:
    > > Andy,
    > > I understand exactly what you want / need to do. What you must understand is
    > > that when your request comes in, the only piece of information available to
    > > the server that could be used for geolocation is the originating IP address.
    > > You can do a lookup against this in DNS and find out approximately where it
    > > came from.
    > >
    > > So how are you going to "spoof" your originating IP address?
    > > Peter
    > >
    > > --
    > > Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    > > http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    > > UnBlog:
    > > http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Andy" wrote:
    > >
    > > > Hi Peter,
    > > >
    > > > Thanks for your response!
    > > > I don't know if we're on the same page though; basically getting
    > > > coordinates / locations isn't my issue, my issue is figuring out how to
    > > > spoof http requests to the current geolocation package that we have to
    > > > ensure that it's working correctly.
    > > >
    > > > Ideally, this would be some sort of tool that allows me to say "OK, I
    > > > want you to access this server and request this page, and tell it
    > > > you're from Las Vegas, Nevada" or something to that effect. I would
    > > > then want to make sure that the geolocation package that we have says
    > > > "Hey, I just got a request from someone in Vegas", and then continue on
    > > > giving it different countries and whatnot.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Peter wrote:
    > > > > Andy,
    > > > > You might want to look into the Virtual Earth "location.ashx" handler that
    > > > > returns the coordinates of the browser making the request. You may have to
    > > > > search around a bit to find this. I've got some info on this in an article I
    > > > > wrote some time ago, here:
    > > > >
    > > > > http://www.eggheadcafe.com/articles/20051109.asp
    > > > >
    > > > > Peter
    > > > >
    > > > > --
    > > > > Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    > > > > http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    > > > > UnBlog:
    > > > > http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > "Andy" wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > Hi guys,
    > > > > >
    > > > > > I'm currently working on a project that determines the geographical
    > > > > > location of a request to our servers. I'm not sure exactly how it
    > > > > > works as the geolocation functionality is coming from a package that
    > > > > > we're integrating with our website. (The package actually does much
    > > > > > more than just give back geographical locations, but that's irrelevant)
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Because of the nature of this project (this is for a financial
    > > > > > institution), we need to test out the package before we begin
    > > > > > integrating it to ensure that it's giving us the right data.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Now, it seems that the obvious course of action would be to find
    > > > > > willing employees who could "hit" the servers and then ensure that the
    > > > > > data is coming back correctly, but this presents a few problems:
    > > > > > - The sample size of the test will be limited to however many
    > > > > > participants we have.
    > > > > > - The majority of the participants reside in the same geographic area.
    > > > > > - The testing servers that this code would be sitting on are behind a
    > > > > > corporate intranet, and so IT would have to get involved to do some
    > > > > > routing magic.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > So now the question: Do any of you know of any good software packages
    > > > > > or methods to spoof the location of an incoming request or have any of
    > > > > > you had to test something like this? Any hints on a workable approach?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Thanks and regards.
    > > > > > Andy
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
     
    Andy, Jul 13, 2006
    #6
  7. Yes, sir. That's it.
    Peter
    --
    Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    UnBlog:
    http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com




    "Andy" wrote:

    > Nevermind Peter, that question was a result of too much coffee.
    >
    > So you can't really spoof an IP address, but that is exactly what I
    > would need to do in order to be able to test this out as I wanted. So
    > I guess it'll just be a matter of sucking it up and trying to get some
    > geographically diverse employees to test this guy out.
    >
    > Thanks again!
    > Andy
    >
    > Andy wrote:
    > > Exactly, that's the question.
    > >
    > > Well, let me ask you this, Peter: If I was to go out to some random
    > > website, DNS it and get it's IP address, if I were to just send that
    > > into this geolocation package sitting on a local machine, would it be
    > > able to tell where it is originating from geographically? That is, are
    > > IP addresses, though dynamically allocated, geographically fixed to
    > > some extent?
    > >
    > > Thanks again!
    > > Andy
    > >
    > > Peter wrote:
    > > > Andy,
    > > > I understand exactly what you want / need to do. What you must understand is
    > > > that when your request comes in, the only piece of information available to
    > > > the server that could be used for geolocation is the originating IP address.
    > > > You can do a lookup against this in DNS and find out approximately where it
    > > > came from.
    > > >
    > > > So how are you going to "spoof" your originating IP address?
    > > > Peter
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    > > > http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    > > > UnBlog:
    > > > http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Andy" wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Hi Peter,
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanks for your response!
    > > > > I don't know if we're on the same page though; basically getting
    > > > > coordinates / locations isn't my issue, my issue is figuring out how to
    > > > > spoof http requests to the current geolocation package that we have to
    > > > > ensure that it's working correctly.
    > > > >
    > > > > Ideally, this would be some sort of tool that allows me to say "OK, I
    > > > > want you to access this server and request this page, and tell it
    > > > > you're from Las Vegas, Nevada" or something to that effect. I would
    > > > > then want to make sure that the geolocation package that we have says
    > > > > "Hey, I just got a request from someone in Vegas", and then continue on
    > > > > giving it different countries and whatnot.
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > Peter wrote:
    > > > > > Andy,
    > > > > > You might want to look into the Virtual Earth "location.ashx" handler that
    > > > > > returns the coordinates of the browser making the request. You may have to
    > > > > > search around a bit to find this. I've got some info on this in an article I
    > > > > > wrote some time ago, here:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > http://www.eggheadcafe.com/articles/20051109.asp
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Peter
    > > > > >
    > > > > > --
    > > > > > Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    > > > > > http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    > > > > > UnBlog:
    > > > > > http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > > > "Andy" wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > > Hi guys,
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > I'm currently working on a project that determines the geographical
    > > > > > > location of a request to our servers. I'm not sure exactly how it
    > > > > > > works as the geolocation functionality is coming from a package that
    > > > > > > we're integrating with our website. (The package actually does much
    > > > > > > more than just give back geographical locations, but that's irrelevant)
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Because of the nature of this project (this is for a financial
    > > > > > > institution), we need to test out the package before we begin
    > > > > > > integrating it to ensure that it's giving us the right data.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Now, it seems that the obvious course of action would be to find
    > > > > > > willing employees who could "hit" the servers and then ensure that the
    > > > > > > data is coming back correctly, but this presents a few problems:
    > > > > > > - The sample size of the test will be limited to however many
    > > > > > > participants we have.
    > > > > > > - The majority of the participants reside in the same geographic area.
    > > > > > > - The testing servers that this code would be sitting on are behind a
    > > > > > > corporate intranet, and so IT would have to get involved to do some
    > > > > > > routing magic.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > So now the question: Do any of you know of any good software packages
    > > > > > > or methods to spoof the location of an incoming request or have any of
    > > > > > > you had to test something like this? Any hints on a workable approach?
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Thanks and regards.
    > > > > > > Andy
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >

    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?UGV0ZXIgQnJvbWJlcmcgW0MjIE1WUF0=?=, Jul 14, 2006
    #7
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