get(char*, num, delim) question

Discussion in 'C++' started by Francis Bell, May 22, 2004.

  1. Francis Bell

    Francis Bell Guest

    Hello,

    I've got a program that is reading in a data file of 25 lines. Here is
    an example of the first two lines:

    sp/spinnerbait/AAA Lures/Mad Phil/silver/bass/1/1
    f/floating minnow/AAA Lures/Skinny Minney/green/bass/0/0/0

    In my program, I need to read in each line, BUT, I need to build a
    different object based upon the characters in the first field. So, I
    need to GET the first characters. And here's where I'm doing something
    incorrectly. This is what I've got so far:

    char readInFirstChars(ifstream &fin) {
    char *first;
    fin.get(first, 3, '/');
    cout << first; // debugging line to see what is output
    }
    return first;
    }

    The above code give me a compile error stating:
    " invalid conversion from `char*' to `char'"

    I tried the get function with the single character parameter like such:
    char first;
    fin.get(first);
    cout << first << endl;
    return first;

    and it works fine. So I must be doing something wrong with the pointer.

    The other tangent problem I'm having with this how to properly cycle
    through the input file so it only reads in the first field and then
    moves on to the next line. I tried
    while (fin.good()) {
    char first;
    fin.get(first);
    cout << first << endl;
    }
    return first;

    Which looped, but it output the entire file. I only need the first
    field. If the first field were only one character, then the only
    problem I would be dealing with is the loop problem, but since it's
    either 1 or 2 characters (with the end delimeter being '/'), I'm also
    dealing with the get() problem.

    Thanks for any advice.

    Frank
    Francis Bell, May 22, 2004
    #1
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  2. "Francis Bell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I've got a program that is reading in a data file of 25 lines. Here is
    > an example of the first two lines:
    >
    > sp/spinnerbait/AAA Lures/Mad Phil/silver/bass/1/1
    > f/floating minnow/AAA Lures/Skinny Minney/green/bass/0/0/0
    >
    > In my program, I need to read in each line, BUT, I need to build a
    > different object based upon the characters in the first field. So, I
    > need to GET the first characters. And here's where I'm doing something
    > incorrectly. This is what I've got so far:
    >
    > char readInFirstChars(ifstream &fin) {
    > char *first;
    > fin.get(first, 3, '/');
    > cout << first; // debugging line to see what is output
    > }
    > return first;
    > }
    >
    > The above code give me a compile error stating:
    > " invalid conversion from `char*' to `char'"
    >
    > I tried the get function with the single character parameter like such:
    > char first;
    > fin.get(first);
    > cout << first << endl;
    > return first;
    >
    > and it works fine. So I must be doing something wrong with the pointer.


    Yes, two different things actually. And of course you should be using a
    pointer at all. Try this

    char first[3];
    fin.getline(first, 3, '/');

    Important lesson is to understand the difference between

    char *first;

    and

    char first[3];

    The first declares a pointer to char, it does not create any characters at
    all. Just declaring a pointer does not make it point at anything. So in your
    code you do not have any characters to read the first field into. Even if
    you had got it to compile it would have crashed when you tried to do the
    read.

    The second declares an array of three characters, these are the three
    characters you are going to read your field into. No need for compilcated
    pointers, just use an array.

    Your second mistake was to use get instead of getline.

    john
    John Harrison, May 22, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Francis Bell

    Francis Bell Guest

    John Harrison wrote:
    > "Francis Bell" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Hello,
    >>
    >>I've got a program that is reading in a data file of 25 lines. Here is
    >>an example of the first two lines:
    >>
    >>sp/spinnerbait/AAA Lures/Mad Phil/silver/bass/1/1
    >>f/floating minnow/AAA Lures/Skinny Minney/green/bass/0/0/0
    >>
    >>In my program, I need to read in each line, BUT, I need to build a
    >>different object based upon the characters in the first field. So, I
    >>need to GET the first characters. And here's where I'm doing something
    >>incorrectly. This is what I've got so far:
    >>
    >>char readInFirstChars(ifstream &fin) {
    >>char *first;
    >> fin.get(first, 3, '/');
    >> cout << first; // debugging line to see what is output
    >>}
    >>return first;
    >>}
    >>
    >>The above code give me a compile error stating:
    >>" invalid conversion from `char*' to `char'"
    >>
    >>I tried the get function with the single character parameter like such:
    >> char first;
    >> fin.get(first);
    >> cout << first << endl;
    >> return first;
    >>
    >>and it works fine. So I must be doing something wrong with the pointer.

    >
    >
    > Yes, two different things actually. And of course you should be using a
    > pointer at all. Try this
    >
    > char first[3];
    > fin.getline(first, 3, '/');
    >
    > Important lesson is to understand the difference between
    >
    > char *first;
    >
    > and
    >
    > char first[3];
    >
    > The first declares a pointer to char, it does not create any characters at
    > all. Just declaring a pointer does not make it point at anything. So in your
    > code you do not have any characters to read the first field into. Even if
    > you had got it to compile it would have crashed when you tried to do the
    > read.
    >
    > The second declares an array of three characters, these are the three
    > characters you are going to read your field into. No need for compilcated
    > pointers, just use an array.
    >
    > Your second mistake was to use get instead of getline.
    >
    > john
    >
    >

    Hi John,
    First, thanks for the quick reply! Unfortunately, I have been
    instructed to use the get() function vice the getline() function. From
    what I understand about the get() function with the three parameters, it
    reads characters into a buffer until num - 1 characters have been read,
    or in my case, until the '/' delim character is encountered. This way,
    if it reads a line where the first field is only one character, it reads
    that character and then encounters the '/' delimeter and stops. But
    it's the first parameter that I'm not doing correctly. ... However,
    what you said about me having just declared a pointer and not pointing
    to anything made me think of something. And I just tried something else
    and it worked for both of my problems! This is what I did:

    while (fin.good())
    {
    fin.get(first, 4, '/');
    cout << first << endl;
    fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    }
    delete [] first;

    This displays 'sp' to the screen for that first line of text in the data
    file and 'f' for the second line, and the first field for all of the
    other lines until EOF.

    So now I'm on to the next problem in my program. But I'll work on that
    for a few hours before posting back if I need to. Thanks again John for
    looking at this. Although I couldn't use the getline as you suggested,
    your suggestion pointed me to my problem. Thanks!

    Frank
    Francis Bell, May 22, 2004
    #3
  4. "Francis Bell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > John Harrison wrote:
    > > "Francis Bell" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >
    > >>Hello,
    > >>
    > >>I've got a program that is reading in a data file of 25 lines. Here is
    > >>an example of the first two lines:
    > >>
    > >>sp/spinnerbait/AAA Lures/Mad Phil/silver/bass/1/1
    > >>f/floating minnow/AAA Lures/Skinny Minney/green/bass/0/0/0
    > >>
    > >>In my program, I need to read in each line, BUT, I need to build a
    > >>different object based upon the characters in the first field. So, I
    > >>need to GET the first characters. And here's where I'm doing something
    > >>incorrectly. This is what I've got so far:
    > >>
    > >>char readInFirstChars(ifstream &fin) {
    > >>char *first;
    > >> fin.get(first, 3, '/');
    > >> cout << first; // debugging line to see what is output
    > >>}
    > >>return first;
    > >>}
    > >>
    > >>The above code give me a compile error stating:
    > >>" invalid conversion from `char*' to `char'"
    > >>
    > >>I tried the get function with the single character parameter like such:
    > >> char first;
    > >> fin.get(first);
    > >> cout << first << endl;
    > >> return first;
    > >>
    > >>and it works fine. So I must be doing something wrong with the pointer.

    > >
    > >
    > > Yes, two different things actually. And of course you should be using a
    > > pointer at all. Try this
    > >
    > > char first[3];
    > > fin.getline(first, 3, '/');
    > >
    > > Important lesson is to understand the difference between
    > >
    > > char *first;
    > >
    > > and
    > >
    > > char first[3];
    > >
    > > The first declares a pointer to char, it does not create any characters

    at
    > > all. Just declaring a pointer does not make it point at anything. So in

    your
    > > code you do not have any characters to read the first field into. Even

    if
    > > you had got it to compile it would have crashed when you tried to do the
    > > read.
    > >
    > > The second declares an array of three characters, these are the three
    > > characters you are going to read your field into. No need for

    compilcated
    > > pointers, just use an array.
    > >
    > > Your second mistake was to use get instead of getline.
    > >
    > > john
    > >
    > >

    > Hi John,
    > First, thanks for the quick reply! Unfortunately, I have been
    > instructed to use the get() function vice the getline() function.


    Any particular reason?

    > From
    > what I understand about the get() function with the three parameters, it
    > reads characters into a buffer until num - 1 characters have been read,
    > or in my case, until the '/' delim character is encountered.


    Yes, I'd forgotten about that, which is why I recommended getline,.but get
    works too. The difference between get and getline, is that getline reads the
    delimiter whereas get doesn't.

    > This way,
    > if it reads a line where the first field is only one character, it reads
    > that character and then encounters the '/' delimeter and stops. But
    > it's the first parameter that I'm not doing correctly. ... However,
    > what you said about me having just declared a pointer and not pointing
    > to anything made me think of something. And I just tried something else
    > and it worked for both of my problems! This is what I did:
    >


    I guess you missed out

    char* first = new char[4];

    or something similar.

    > while (fin.good())
    > {
    > fin.get(first, 4, '/');
    > cout << first << endl;
    > fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    > }
    > delete [] first;


    Its still preferable to use an array instead of a pointer. Its more
    efficient, safer and simpler, what's not to like?

    Also you loop is wrong. The file might still be good even when you are at
    the end of the file so you end up going round the loop one too many times.
    Your loop should look like this

    while (fin.get(first, 4, '/'))
    {
    cout << first << endl;
    fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    }

    john
    John Harrison, May 22, 2004
    #4
  5. Francis Bell

    Phrank Guest

    On Sat, 22 May 2004 22:54:45 +0100, "John Harrison"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Francis Bell" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> John Harrison wrote:
    >> > "Francis Bell" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:...
    >> >
    >> >>Hello,
    >> >>
    >> >>I've got a program that is reading in a data file of 25 lines. Here is
    >> >>an example of the first two lines:
    >> >>
    >> >>sp/spinnerbait/AAA Lures/Mad Phil/silver/bass/1/1
    >> >>f/floating minnow/AAA Lures/Skinny Minney/green/bass/0/0/0
    >> >>
    >> >>In my program, I need to read in each line, BUT, I need to build a
    >> >>different object based upon the characters in the first field. So, I
    >> >>need to GET the first characters. And here's where I'm doing something
    >> >>incorrectly. This is what I've got so far:
    >> >>
    >> >>char readInFirstChars(ifstream &fin) {
    >> >>char *first;
    >> >> fin.get(first, 3, '/');
    >> >> cout << first; // debugging line to see what is output
    >> >>}
    >> >>return first;
    >> >>}
    >> >>
    >> >>The above code give me a compile error stating:
    >> >>" invalid conversion from `char*' to `char'"
    >> >>
    >> >>I tried the get function with the single character parameter like such:
    >> >> char first;
    >> >> fin.get(first);
    >> >> cout << first << endl;
    >> >> return first;
    >> >>
    >> >>and it works fine. So I must be doing something wrong with the pointer.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > Yes, two different things actually. And of course you should be using a
    >> > pointer at all. Try this
    >> >
    >> > char first[3];
    >> > fin.getline(first, 3, '/');
    >> >
    >> > Important lesson is to understand the difference between
    >> >
    >> > char *first;
    >> >
    >> > and
    >> >
    >> > char first[3];
    >> >
    >> > The first declares a pointer to char, it does not create any characters

    >at
    >> > all. Just declaring a pointer does not make it point at anything. So in

    >your
    >> > code you do not have any characters to read the first field into. Even

    >if
    >> > you had got it to compile it would have crashed when you tried to do the
    >> > read.
    >> >
    >> > The second declares an array of three characters, these are the three
    >> > characters you are going to read your field into. No need for

    >compilcated
    >> > pointers, just use an array.
    >> >
    >> > Your second mistake was to use get instead of getline.
    >> >
    >> > john
    >> >
    >> >

    >> Hi John,
    >> First, thanks for the quick reply! Unfortunately, I have been
    >> instructed to use the get() function vice the getline() function.

    >
    >Any particular reason?
    >
    >> From
    >> what I understand about the get() function with the three parameters, it
    >> reads characters into a buffer until num - 1 characters have been read,
    >> or in my case, until the '/' delim character is encountered.

    >
    >Yes, I'd forgotten about that, which is why I recommended getline,.but get
    >works too. The difference between get and getline, is that getline reads the
    >delimiter whereas get doesn't.
    >
    >> This way,
    >> if it reads a line where the first field is only one character, it reads
    >> that character and then encounters the '/' delimeter and stops. But
    >> it's the first parameter that I'm not doing correctly. ... However,
    >> what you said about me having just declared a pointer and not pointing
    >> to anything made me think of something. And I just tried something else
    >> and it worked for both of my problems! This is what I did:
    >>

    >
    >I guess you missed out
    >
    >char* first = new char[4];
    >
    >or something similar.
    >
    >> while (fin.good())
    >> {
    >> fin.get(first, 4, '/');
    >> cout << first << endl;
    >> fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    >> }
    >> delete [] first;

    >
    >Its still preferable to use an array instead of a pointer. Its more
    >efficient, safer and simpler, what's not to like?
    >
    >Also you loop is wrong. The file might still be good even when you are at
    >the end of the file so you end up going round the loop one too many times.
    >Your loop should look like this
    >
    >while (fin.get(first, 4, '/'))
    >{
    > cout << first << endl;
    > fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    >}
    >
    >john
    >


    Yeah, sorry, I forgot to copy and paste the pointer declaration. What
    you put is accurate. This project is for a class, and my lab
    instructor said we needed to use get() because we need the practice
    with it. Although an array may be safer and simpler, this form of
    get() that I needed to use doesn't allow for an array in the
    parameters, otherwise I would have used it (primarily because I'm just
    now getting used to pointers and I know that I know just enough about
    them to be dangerous: :) ) I'll use the loop enhancement. Thanks
    again John!!

    Frank
    Phrank, May 22, 2004
    #5
  6. Francis Bell

    Siemel Naran Guest

    Francis Bell <> wrote in message

    > >>sp/spinnerbait/AAA Lures/Mad Phil/silver/bass/1/1
    > >>f/floating minnow/AAA Lures/Skinny Minney/green/bass/0/0/0


    > > char first[3];
    > > fin.getline(first, 3, '/');


    > while (fin.good())
    > {
    > fin.get(first, 4, '/');
    > cout << first << endl;
    > fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    > }
    > delete [] first;


    How did you declare first? If as char first[4] then the call to
    delete is unnecessary, and will, in some systems, cause a program
    crash.
    Siemel Naran, May 23, 2004
    #6
  7. Francis Bell

    Francis Bell Guest

    Siemel Naran wrote:
    > Francis Bell <> wrote in message
    >
    >
    >>>>sp/spinnerbait/AAA Lures/Mad Phil/silver/bass/1/1
    >>>>f/floating minnow/AAA Lures/Skinny Minney/green/bass/0/0/0

    >
    >
    >>>char first[3];
    >>>fin.getline(first, 3, '/');

    >
    >
    >> while (fin.good())
    >> {
    >> fin.get(first, 4, '/');
    >> cout << first << endl;
    >> fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    >> }
    >> delete [] first;

    >
    >
    > How did you declare first? If as char first[4] then the call to
    > delete is unnecessary, and will, in some systems, cause a program
    > crash.

    Hi all,

    I declared first like this:

    void readInFirstChars(ifstream &fin)
    {
    char* first;
    first = new char[2];
    while (fin.good())
    {
    fin.get(first, 4, '/');
    cout << first << endl;
    fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    }
    cout << "Here first" << endl;
    if (first == "sp") {
    cout << "Here second" << endl;
    Spinnerbait temp;
    readInASpinnerbait(fin);
    temp.outputSpinnerbait(cout);
    }
    delete [] first;

    I included my whole function because I spoke too soon earlier when I
    said everything worked. My function is not getting inside the 'if'
    clause. I know this because "Here first" is printing out to the screen,
    but "Here second" is not. I'm pretty sure it's because of my condition
    (first == "sp"). I know first is a pointer to my character array that
    gets my first field from the data file, so comparing it with "sp" is
    probably, no IS incorrect. But I tried dereferencing first and
    comparing, and I got a compile error stating, "ISO C++ forbids
    comparison between pointer and integer". So, that said, how do I go
    about comparing these?
    Francis Bell, May 23, 2004
    #7
  8. >
    > Yeah, sorry, I forgot to copy and paste the pointer declaration. What
    > you put is accurate. This project is for a class, and my lab
    > instructor said we needed to use get() because we need the practice
    > with it. Although an array may be safer and simpler, this form of
    > get() that I needed to use doesn't allow for an array in the
    > parameters,


    That is not true, an array and a pointer are equivalent in this situation
    (as they are in most situations).

    john
    John Harrison, May 23, 2004
    #8
  9. > Hi all,
    >
    > I declared first like this:
    >
    > void readInFirstChars(ifstream &fin)
    > {
    > char* first;
    > first = new char[2];


    first = new char[4];

    but as I said earlier you should be using an array

    char first[4];

    In either case though you need four characters, if you are going to say
    fin.get(first, 4, '/');

    > while (fin.good())
    > {
    > fin.get(first, 4, '/');
    > cout << first << endl;
    > fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    > }
    > cout << "Here first" << endl;
    > if (first == "sp") {


    This is wrong, you do not compare strings with ==

    if (strcmp(first, "sp") == 0)

    > cout << "Here second" << endl;
    > Spinnerbait temp;
    > readInASpinnerbait(fin);
    > temp.outputSpinnerbait(cout);
    > }
    > delete [] first;


    Get rid of this if you switch to an array.

    >
    > I included my whole function because I spoke too soon earlier when I
    > said everything worked. My function is not getting inside the 'if'
    > clause. I know this because "Here first" is printing out to the screen,
    > but "Here second" is not. I'm pretty sure it's because of my condition
    > (first == "sp"). I know first is a pointer to my character array that
    > gets my first field from the data file, so comparing it with "sp" is
    > probably, no IS incorrect.


    No, first == "sp" is a pointer comparison, it compares where first is
    pointing to with where "sp" is. You need strcmp to copare the strings
    themeselves.

    > But I tried dereferencing first and
    > comparing, and I got a compile error stating, "ISO C++ forbids
    > comparison between pointer and integer". So, that said, how do I go
    > about comparing these?
    >


    Seems like you are learning an old fashioned style of C++ programming.
    Modern C++ has a string class which is easier to use than a char array (or
    char pointer).

    john
    John Harrison, May 23, 2004
    #9
  10. Francis Bell

    Siemel Naran Guest

    Francis Bell <> wrote in message

    > sp/spinnerbait/AAA Lures/Mad Phil/silver/bass/1/1
    > f/floating minnow/AAA Lures/Skinny Minney/green/bass/0/0/0


    > void readInFirstChars(ifstream &fin)
    > {
    > char* first;
    > first = new char[2];


    It's fine to just say
    char first[2];
    and remove the delete statement below.

    > while (fin.good())
    > {
    > fin.get(first, 4, '/');


    Why is first of 2 chars but you read 4 chars into it?

    > cout << first << endl;
    > fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    > }
    > cout << "Here first" << endl;
    > if (first == "sp") {


    You're comparing the value of the pointers (ie. comparing the memory
    address locations). Use std::strcmp from <cstring> (same as strcmp
    from string.h).

    > cout << "Here second" << endl;
    > Spinnerbait temp;
    > readInASpinnerbait(fin);
    > temp.outputSpinnerbait(cout);
    > }
    > delete [] first;
    Siemel Naran, May 23, 2004
    #10
  11. Francis Bell

    Phrank Guest

    On 22 May 2004 23:56:12 -0700, (Siemel Naran)
    wrote:

    >Francis Bell <> wrote in message
    >
    >> sp/spinnerbait/AAA Lures/Mad Phil/silver/bass/1/1
    >> f/floating minnow/AAA Lures/Skinny Minney/green/bass/0/0/0

    >
    >> void readInFirstChars(ifstream &fin)
    >> {
    >> char* first;
    >> first = new char[2];

    >
    >It's fine to just say
    > char first[2];
    >and remove the delete statement below.
    >
    >> while (fin.good())
    >> {
    >> fin.get(first, 4, '/');

    >
    >Why is first of 2 chars but you read 4 chars into it?
    >
    >> cout << first << endl;
    >> fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    >> }
    >> cout << "Here first" << endl;
    >> if (first == "sp") {

    >
    >You're comparing the value of the pointers (ie. comparing the memory
    >address locations). Use std::strcmp from <cstring> (same as strcmp
    >from string.h).
    >
    >> cout << "Here second" << endl;
    >> Spinnerbait temp;
    >> readInASpinnerbait(fin);
    >> temp.outputSpinnerbait(cout);
    >> }
    >> delete [] first;

    Thanks John and Siemel. I'll go back in and try changing it to an
    array. However, the documentation for the parameters for that form of
    get() function show that the first parameter needs to be a char*, but
    I'll try the array. Also, the documentation says that for the second
    parameter (num), it reads up to num-1 characters of the input stream,
    or until the delimeter (third parameter) is reached or EOF is reached.
    So, I have at most a two character first field with a third character
    being the '/' delimeter for a total of 3 characters for the function
    to read. So I simply figured it needed num - 1 and I needed 3 so
    that's where I came up with 4. And I've used the strcmp before, but
    completely forgot about it. Thanks! I'll get back with you and let
    you know how things work out.

    Frank
    Phrank, May 23, 2004
    #11
  12. > Thanks John and Siemel. I'll go back in and try changing it to an
    > array. However, the documentation for the parameters for that form of
    > get() function show that the first parameter needs to be a char*, but
    > I'll try the array.


    Yes, array are autoamtically converted to pointers, so any function which
    say it needs a pointer can be given an array.

    Also, the documentation says that for the second
    > parameter (num), it reads up to num-1 characters of the input stream,
    > or until the delimeter (third parameter) is reached or EOF is reached.
    > So, I have at most a two character first field with a third character
    > being the '/' delimeter for a total of 3 characters for the function
    > to read. So I simply figured it needed num - 1 and I needed 3 so
    > that's where I came up with 4.


    4 is fine, but the size of the array and the size you pass to get must be
    the same. You are telling get that you have four characters in the array,
    but actually you've only got two.

    john
    John Harrison, May 23, 2004
    #12
  13. Francis Bell

    Francis Bell Guest

    Phrank wrote:
    > On 22 May 2004 23:56:12 -0700, (Siemel Naran)
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Francis Bell <> wrote in message
    >>
    >>
    >>>sp/spinnerbait/AAA Lures/Mad Phil/silver/bass/1/1
    >>>f/floating minnow/AAA Lures/Skinny Minney/green/bass/0/0/0

    >>
    >>>void readInFirstChars(ifstream &fin)
    >>>{
    >>> char* first;
    >>> first = new char[2];

    >>
    >>It's fine to just say
    >> char first[2];
    >>and remove the delete statement below.
    >>
    >>
    >>> while (fin.good())
    >>> {
    >>> fin.get(first, 4, '/');

    >>
    >>Why is first of 2 chars but you read 4 chars into it?
    >>
    >>
    >>> cout << first << endl;
    >>> fin.ignore(80, '\n');
    >>> }
    >>>cout << "Here first" << endl;
    >>> if (first == "sp") {

    >>
    >>You're comparing the value of the pointers (ie. comparing the memory
    >>address locations). Use std::strcmp from <cstring> (same as strcmp

    >
    >>from string.h).

    >
    >>>cout << "Here second" << endl;
    >>> Spinnerbait temp;
    >>> readInASpinnerbait(fin);
    >>> temp.outputSpinnerbait(cout);
    >>> }
    >>> delete [] first;

    >
    > Thanks John and Siemel. I'll go back in and try changing it to an
    > array. However, the documentation for the parameters for that form of
    > get() function show that the first parameter needs to be a char*, but
    > I'll try the array. Also, the documentation says that for the second
    > parameter (num), it reads up to num-1 characters of the input stream,
    > or until the delimeter (third parameter) is reached or EOF is reached.
    > So, I have at most a two character first field with a third character
    > being the '/' delimeter for a total of 3 characters for the function
    > to read. So I simply figured it needed num - 1 and I needed 3 so
    > that's where I came up with 4. And I've used the strcmp before, but
    > completely forgot about it. Thanks! I'll get back with you and let
    > you know how things work out.
    >
    > Frank

    Hi all,

    I changed things around and am now using the array version. Everything
    for this part of the problem is working fine now. I still have other
    issues with the program, but it's one step at a time, and I want to look
    at it further myself and try to figure it out before posting here.
    Thanks again!

    Frank
    Francis Bell, May 24, 2004
    #13
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