Get to the Point: Ruby and Rails Presentation Slides

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by John W. Long, Sep 15, 2005.

  1. John W. Long

    John W. Long Guest

    Hi,

    Ryan Platte and I just did a presentation to the Chicago ACM about Ruby
    this evening. Our slides are available for others to use here:

    http://johnwlong.com/slides/gettothepoint/

    Comments and suggestions are welcome. We would like to present this
    again in the future, so it would be good to clarify things a little.

    Please note: slides are best if viewed in Firefox or Safari.

    --
    John Long
    http://wiseheartdesign.com
     
    John W. Long, Sep 15, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Cool! My browser's sorta, uh, frozen right now (that's what happens when
    you have ~200 tabs open), so I can't look at it, but you might consider
    sticking a link to it on the Why Ruby? page
    (www.rubygarden/ruby?WhyRuby, I believe).

    Devin

    John W. Long wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Ryan Platte and I just did a presentation to the Chicago ACM about
    > Ruby this evening. Our slides are available for others to use here:
    >
    > http://johnwlong.com/slides/gettothepoint/
    >
    > Comments and suggestions are welcome. We would like to present this
    > again in the future, so it would be good to clarify things a little.
    >
    > Please note: slides are best if viewed in Firefox or Safari.
    >
    > --
    > John Long
    > http://wiseheartdesign.com
    >
    >
    >
     
    Devin Mullins, Sep 15, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. John W. Long

    Josh Charles Guest

    On 9/14/05, John W. Long <> wrote:
    > Comments and suggestions are welcome. We would like to present this
    > again in the future, so it would be good to clarify things a little.


    Excellent Presentation. The only thing I didn't quite understand was
    the "method_missing" stuff. I haven't encountered that before; could
    you add to that a little bit?

    Josh
     
    Josh Charles, Sep 15, 2005
    #3
  4. John W. Long

    Bil Kleb Guest

    John W. Long wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Ryan Platte and I just did a presentation to the Chicago ACM about Ruby
    > this evening. Our slides are available for others to use here:
    >
    > http://johnwlong.com/slides/gettothepoint/
    >
    > Comments and suggestions are welcome.


    From Tufte's "The Smallest Effective Difference"
    chapter in /Visual Explanations/, I would tone
    down the syntax highlighting contrasts by an
    order of magnitude.

    Otherwise, quite refreshing. Thanks for sharing.

    What's the wget or curl command to grab the
    lot so I can stick it on a disc to give to
    some newbies?

    Thanks,
    --
    Bil
    http://fun3d.larc.nasa.gov
     
    Bil Kleb, Sep 15, 2005
    #4
  5. John W. Long

    Curt Hibbs Guest

    ------=_Part_13696_9647129.1126797569914
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
    Content-Disposition: inline

    Ruby uses the same model of method invocation as Smalltalk. Conceptually,=
    =20
    you send a "message" to an object. The message has a name and a set of=20
    parameters. Ruby attempts to find a method definition that matches the=20
    signature of the message in the target object's class and each of its=20
    superclasses.=20

    If no matching method is found, Ruby sends a "method_missing" message to th=
    e=20
    object instead (including the original message as a parameter). Most object=
    s=20
    don't implement method_missing and the implementation in Ruby's root object=
    =20
    is invoked (which output the standard error message).

    If the object does implement method_missing, then it gets control and can d=
    o=20
    whatever it wants with the original message. In the case of this example, i=
    t=20
    forwards the original message to the object it is proxying.

    This is a powerful feature when you are building reusable frameworks. Rails=
    =20
    uses this to provide "virtual" implementations of its find_* methods.=20
    FreeRIDE uses this to implement attributes on its Databus nodes.

    Hope that helped.

    Curt

    On 9/15/05, Josh Charles <> wrote:
    >=20
    > On 9/14/05, John W. Long <> wrote:
    > > Comments and suggestions are welcome. We would like to present this
    > > again in the future, so it would be good to clarify things a little.

    >=20
    > Excellent Presentation. The only thing I didn't quite understand was
    > the "method_missing" stuff. I haven't encountered that before; could
    > you add to that a little bit?
    >=20
    > Josh
    >=20
    >


    ------=_Part_13696_9647129.1126797569914--
     
    Curt Hibbs, Sep 15, 2005
    #5
  6. * Bil Kleb () wrote:
    > John W. Long wrote:
    > >Hi,
    > >
    > >Ryan Platte and I just did a presentation to the Chicago ACM about Ruby
    > >this evening. Our slides are available for others to use here:
    > >
    > >http://johnwlong.com/slides/gettothepoint/
    > >
    > >Comments and suggestions are welcome.

    >
    > From Tufte's "The Smallest Effective Difference"
    > chapter in /Visual Explanations/, I would tone
    > down the syntax highlighting contrasts by an
    > order of magnitude.
    >
    > Otherwise, quite refreshing. Thanks for sharing.
    >
    > What's the wget or curl command to grab the
    > lot so I can stick it on a disc to give to
    > some newbies?


    This worked for me:

    %wget -r http://johnwlong.com/slides/gettothepoint/

    Had to get the images manually though because wget doesn't know anything
    about CSS.

    /images/background.gif
    /images/code-bottom-right.gif
    /images/code-top-left.gif
    /images/prev.gif
    /images/next.gif
    /images/stripe.png

    Perhaps John could provide a tar or zip. :)

    Emiel
    --
    Emiel van de Laar
     
    Emiel van de Laar, Sep 15, 2005
    #6
  7. John W. Long

    John W. Long Guest

    Bil Kleb wrote:
    > From Tufte's "The Smallest Effective Difference"
    > chapter in /Visual Explanations/, I would tone
    > down the syntax highlighting contrasts by an
    > order of magnitude.


    I've never read this book. Can you explain the reasoning behind what you
    suggest in a little more detail?

    > Otherwise, quite refreshing. Thanks for sharing.


    Thanks!

    > What's the wget or curl command to grab the
    > lot so I can stick it on a disc to give to
    > some newbies?


    It should be available in the Why Ruby project documentation in a little
    bit. I'm waiting on Curt Hibbs to approve it:

    http://rubyforge.org/docman/?group_id=251

    --
    John Long
    http://wiseheartdesign.com
     
    John W. Long, Sep 16, 2005
    #7
  8. John W. Long

    John W. Long Guest

    John W. Long, Sep 16, 2005
    #8
  9. John W. Long

    Bil Kleb Guest

    John W. Long wrote:
    > Bil Kleb wrote:
    >
    >> From Tufte's "The Smallest Effective Difference"
    >> chapter in /Visual Explanations/, I would tone
    >> down the syntax highlighting contrasts by an
    >> order of magnitude.

    >
    > I've never read this book.


    If you're in the U.S., I highly recommend making every
    effort to get yourself to one of Tufte's short courses,

    http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/courses

    (You'll get a copy of his books as part of the course
    fee.)

    > Can you explain the reasoning behind what you
    > suggest in a little more detail?


    Many some quotations from that chapter, will help?

    Make all visual distinctions as subtle as possible,
    but still clear and effective.

    /small/ differences allow /more/ differences

    In designing information, then, the idea is to use
    /just notable differences/, visual elements that
    make a clear difference but no more -- contrasts
    that are definite, effective, /and/ minimal.

    when /everything/ is emphasized, /nothing/ is
    emphasized; the design will often be noisy,
    cluttered, and informationally flat.

    Regards,
    --
    Bil
    http://fun3d.larc.nasa.gov
     
    Bil Kleb, Sep 16, 2005
    #9
  10. John W. Long

    Curt Hibbs Guest

    ------=_Part_19430_7648088.1126869198806
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
    Content-Disposition: inline

    On 9/16/05, Bil Kleb <> wrote:
    >=20
    > In designing information, then, the idea is to use
    > /just notable differences/, visual elements that
    > make a clear difference but no more -- contrasts
    > that are definite, effective, /and/ minimal.
    >=20
    > when /everything/ is emphasized, /nothing/ is
    > emphasized; the design will often be noisy,
    > cluttered, and informationally flat.



    Hmmm... reminds me of when I find a chapter of a book so interested that I=
    =20
    use my highlighter on 80% of it and then find my highlighting to be totally=
    =20
    useless! :)

    Curt

    ------=_Part_19430_7648088.1126869198806--
     
    Curt Hibbs, Sep 16, 2005
    #10
  11. John W. Long

    John W. Long Guest

    Bil Kleb wrote:
    > John W. Long wrote:
    >> Bil Kleb wrote:
    >>> From Tufte's "The Smallest Effective Difference"
    >>> chapter in /Visual Explanations/, I would tone
    >>> down the syntax highlighting contrasts by an
    >>> order of magnitude.

    >>
    >> I've never read this book.

    >
    > If you're in the U.S., I highly recommend making every
    > effort to get yourself to one of Tufte's short courses,
    >
    > http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/courses
    >
    > (You'll get a copy of his books as part of the course
    > fee.)
    >
    > > Can you explain the reasoning behind what you
    > > suggest in a little more detail?

    >
    > Many some quotations from that chapter, will help?


    Very interesting. Thanks.

    --
    John
     
    John W. Long, Sep 16, 2005
    #11
  12. John W. Long

    Hugh Sasse Guest

    On Fri, 16 Sep 2005, Bil Kleb wrote:

    > John W. Long wrote:
    >> Bil Kleb wrote:
    >>
    >>> From Tufte's "The Smallest Effective Difference"
    >>> chapter in /Visual Explanations/, I would tone

    [...]
    > http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/courses
    >
    > (You'll get a copy of his books as part of the course
    > fee.)
    >
    >> Can you explain the reasoning behind what you
    >> suggest in a little more detail?

    >
    > Many some quotations from that chapter, will help?
    >
    > Make all visual distinctions as subtle as possible,
    > but still clear and effective.
    >
    > /small/ differences allow /more/ differences
    >
    > In designing information, then, the idea is to use
    > /just notable differences/, visual elements that
    > make a clear difference but no more -- contrasts
    > that are definite, effective, /and/ minimal.


    Yes, but remember that not everyone has perfect eyesight!!!
    Your values for /just not[ic]able differences/ should probably
    be a few dB's up if you have. And some people are colour blind.
    >
    > when /everything/ is emphasized, /nothing/ is
    > emphasized; the design will often be noisy,
    > cluttered, and informationally flat.


    This is certainly true. [Caveat lector: I've not looked at the
    slides for this presentation yet, so am not criticising those at
    all. These are general remarks.]
    >
    > Regards,
    > --
    > Bil
    > http://fun3d.larc.nasa.gov
    >

    Hugh
    >
     
    Hugh Sasse, Sep 16, 2005
    #12
  13. John W. Long

    Bil Kleb Guest

    Curt Hibbs wrote:
    >
    > Hmmm... reminds me of when I find a chapter of a book so interest[ing] that I
    > use my highlighter on 80% of it and then find my highlighting to be totally
    > useless! :)


    Once upon a time, I read a recommendation to
    highlightstuff with which you do not agree or
    understand and *not* the stuff you with which
    you agree.

    Later,
    --
    Bil
    http://fun3d.larc.nasa.gov
     
    Bil Kleb, Sep 16, 2005
    #13
  14. John W. Long

    Han Holl Guest

    ------=_Part_8335_28562607.1126873485974
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
    Content-Disposition: inline

    On 9/15/05, John W. Long <> wrote:
    >=20
    > Hi,
    >=20
    > Ryan Platte and I just did a presentation to the Chicago ACM about Ruby
    > this evening. Our slides are available for others to use here:
    >=20
    > http://johnwlong.com/slides/gettothepoint/
    >=20
    > Comments and suggestions are welcome. We would like to present this
    > again in the future, so it would be good to clarify things a little.
    >=20
    > Please note: slides are best if viewed in Firefox or Safari.
    >=20
    > --
    > John Long
    > http://wiseheartdesign.com
    >=20
    >=20
    > On slide 2, it would be clearer to do:

    # Output "Ruby Rocks!
    Ruby Rocks!
    Ruby Rocks!
    Ruby Rocks!
    Ruby Rocks!
    "
    but it's a bit awkward as a comment.

    Han

    ------=_Part_8335_28562607.1126873485974--
     
    Han Holl, Sep 16, 2005
    #14
  15. On 16/09/05, Bil Kleb <> wrote:
    > John W. Long wrote:
    > > Bil Kleb wrote:
    > >
    > >> From Tufte's "The Smallest Effective Difference"
    > >> chapter in /Visual Explanations/, I would tone
    > >> down the syntax highlighting contrasts by an
    > >> order of magnitude.

    > >
    > > I've never read this book.

    >=20
    > If you're in the U.S., I highly recommend making every
    > effort to get yourself to one of Tufte's short courses,
    >=20
    > http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/courses
    >=20
    > (You'll get a copy of his books as part of the course
    > fee.)
    >=20
    > > Can you explain the reasoning behind what you
    > > suggest in a little more detail?

    >=20
    > Many some quotations from that chapter, will help?
    >=20
    > Make all visual distinctions as subtle as possible,
    > but still clear and effective.
    >=20
    > /small/ differences allow /more/ differences
    >=20
    > In designing information, then, the idea is to use
    > /just notable differences/, visual elements that
    > make a clear difference but no more -- contrasts
    > that are definite, effective, /and/ minimal.
    >=20
    > when /everything/ is emphasized, /nothing/ is
    > emphasized; the design will often be noisy,
    > cluttered, and informationally flat.
    >=20


    For my taste too many words in this passage are highlighted. If it is
    really a one to one quotation from the book including emphasis, I
    think he may not have understood how to depict information clearly and
    not burry it under emphasis noise ;-)

    regards,

    Brian


    --=20
    http://ruby.brian-schroeder.de/

    Stringed instrument chords: http://chordlist.brian-schroeder.de/
     
    Brian Schröder, Sep 19, 2005
    #15
  16. John W. Long

    Bil Kleb Guest

    Brian Schröder wrote:
    >>>Bil Kleb wrote:

    >>
    >>Ma[ybe] some quotations from that chapter, will help?
    >>
    >> Make all visual distinctions as subtle as possible,
    >> but still clear and effective.
    >>
    >> /small/ differences allow /more/ differences
    >>
    >> In designing information, then, the idea is to use
    >> /just notable differences/, visual elements that
    >> make a clear difference but no more -- contrasts
    >> that are definite, effective, /and/ minimal.
    >>
    >> when /everything/ is emphasized, /nothing/ is
    >> emphasized; the design will often be noisy,
    >> cluttered, and informationally flat.

    >
    > For my taste too many words in this passage are highlighted.


    Agreed, but these are just the key sentences out of
    a 6-page chapter (which were easy to identify because
    of their emphasis). ;)

    My apologies for not making that clear.

    Regards,
    --
    Bil
    http://fun3d.larc.nasa.gov
     
    Bil Kleb, Sep 19, 2005
    #16
  17. John W. Long

    Zach Dennis Guest

    John W. Long wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Ryan Platte and I just did a presentation to the Chicago ACM about Ruby
    > this evening. Our slides are available for others to use here:
    >
    > http://johnwlong.com/slides/gettothepoint/
    >
    > Comments and suggestions are welcome. We would like to present this
    > again in the future, so it would be good to clarify things a little.
    >
    > Please note: slides are best if viewed in Firefox or Safari.


    Thanks for posting this John. I am going to go over later today. I have
    one question thus far....Are you allowing public use of the look in your
    slides for other ruby presentations?

    Zach
     
    Zach Dennis, Oct 6, 2005
    #17
  18. John W. Long

    Zach Dennis Guest

    Zach Dennis wrote:
    > John W. Long wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> Ryan Platte and I just did a presentation to the Chicago ACM about
    >> Ruby this evening. Our slides are available for others to use here:
    >>
    >> http://johnwlong.com/slides/gettothepoint/
    >>
    >> Comments and suggestions are welcome. We would like to present this
    >> again in the future, so it would be good to clarify things a little.
    >>
    >> Please note: slides are best if viewed in Firefox or Safari.

    >
    >
    > Thanks for posting this John. I am going to go over later today. I have
    > one question thus far....Are you allowing public use of the look in your
    > slides for other ruby presentations?


    I just realized that this was posted about a month ago. I do not know
    how it just now showed up in my inbox. =)

    Zach
     
    Zach Dennis, Oct 6, 2005
    #18
  19. John W. Long

    John W. Long Guest

    Re: [Vit-discuss] Get to the Point: Ruby and Rails Presentation Slides

    It's fine with me if you use the HTML and images in your own Ruby
    presentations. Right now I will retain rights on the look, images, and
    design.

    --
    John Long
    http://wiseheartdesign.com

    Zach Dennis wrote:
    > John W. Long wrote:
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>Ryan Platte and I just did a presentation to the Chicago ACM about Ruby
    >>this evening. Our slides are available for others to use here:
    >>
    >>http://johnwlong.com/slides/gettothepoint/
    >>
    >>Comments and suggestions are welcome. We would like to present this
    >>again in the future, so it would be good to clarify things a little.
    >>
    >>Please note: slides are best if viewed in Firefox or Safari.

    >
    >
    > Thanks for posting this John. I am going to go over later today. I have
    > one question thus far....Are you allowing public use of the look in your
    > slides for other ruby presentations?
    >
    > Zach
    > _______________________________________________
    > vit-discuss mailing list
    >
    > http://rubyforge.org/mailman/listinfo/vit-discuss
    >
    >
     
    John W. Long, Oct 7, 2005
    #19
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Mike C. Fletcher

    Metaclasses presentation slides available...

    Mike C. Fletcher, Aug 28, 2003, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    346
    Alex Martelli
    Aug 29, 2003
  2. Krypto

    Python Power Point Slides

    Krypto, May 15, 2007, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    459
  3. Saraswati lakki
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,408
    Saraswati lakki
    Jan 6, 2012
  4. Austin Ziegler
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    151
    gabriele renzi
    Oct 10, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page