Github (was Re: Free lightweight C++ signals and slots library)

Discussion in 'C++' started by Jorgen Grahn, Aug 11, 2012.

  1. Jorgen Grahn

    Jorgen Grahn Guest

    On Sat, 2012-08-11, Leigh Johnston wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I present "neosigslot" a new, free to use/modify, lightweight signals
    > and slots library that has the following features:

    ....
    > http://i42.co.uk/stuff/neosigslot.htm


    Side note: I am a bit surprised that people don't generally use Github
    (or Git in general) for these things. None of the three or so recent
    announcements have pointed to a Git repository.

    /Jorgen

    --
    // Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
    \X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
    Jorgen Grahn, Aug 11, 2012
    #1
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  2. Jorgen Grahn

    Jorgen Grahn Guest

    On Sat, 2012-08-11, Leigh Johnston wrote:
    > On 11/08/2012 19:44, Jorgen Grahn wrote:
    >> On Sat, 2012-08-11, Leigh Johnston wrote:
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> I present "neosigslot" a new, free to use/modify, lightweight signals
    >>> and slots library that has the following features:

    >> ...
    >>> http://i42.co.uk/stuff/neosigslot.htm

    >>
    >> Side note: I am a bit surprised that people don't generally use Github
    >> (or Git in general) for these things. None of the three or so recent
    >> announcements have pointed to a Git repository.

    >
    > Git? Hiss! Boo! The author of Git hates C++!


    As the saying goes in .se: even a blind hen sometimes finds a corn of
    grain.

    The best strategy is to (a) laugh at them, (b) ignore their clown acts
    and (c) use the grains they actually *do* find.

    /Jorgen

    --
    // Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
    \X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
    Jorgen Grahn, Aug 11, 2012
    #2
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  3. Jorgen Grahn

    Rui Maciel Guest

    Leigh Johnston wrote:

    > Git? Hiss! Boo! The author of Git hates C++!


    In spite of what Linus Torvalds might think about C++, he did an exquisite
    job with Git. It would be silly to miss out on an excellent tool just
    because the guy who developed it had an opinion on something.


    Rui Maciel
    Rui Maciel, Aug 11, 2012
    #3
  4. On 2012-08-11, Robert Wessel wrote:
    >>>> I present "neosigslot" a new, free to use/modify, lightweight signals
    >>>> and slots library that has the following features:
    >>> ...
    >>>> http://i42.co.uk/stuff/neosigslot.htm
    >>>
    >>> Side note: I am a bit surprised that people don't generally use Github
    >>> (or Git in general) for these things. None of the three or so recent
    >>> announcements have pointed to a Git repository.

    >>
    >>Git? Hiss! Boo! The author of Git hates C++!

    >
    >
    > Linus is certainly not fond of C++,


    The actual Git maintainer is Junio Hamano and not Linus Torvalds even
    if Linus once started the Git development.

    And Linus is for sure not against C++. He himself once tried to use
    C++ in the Linux kernel. The experiment was not successful, but that
    was only because of memory and CPU limitation in those days. It was
    possible to compile the kernel, but that could last for many days
    which was considered to be inacceptable.

    > but how does that bear on the usefulness of Git for C++ projects? I
    > assume he dislikes Cobol as well, but Git ought to work well there
    > too.


    Of course. You can put any data under the control of Git. Git tracks
    the whole content not specific files.



    Bernd

    --
    "Die Antisemiten vergeben es den Juden nicht, dass die Juden Geist
    haben - und Geld." [Friedrich Nietzsche]
    Bernd Nawothnig, Aug 12, 2012
    #4
  5. Jorgen Grahn

    Rui Maciel Guest

    Bernd Nawothnig wrote:

    > And Linus is for sure not against C++. He himself once tried to use
    > C++ in the Linux kernel. The experiment was not successful, but that
    > was only because of memory and CPU limitation in those days. It was
    > possible to compile the kernel, but that could last for many days
    > which was considered to be inacceptable.


    The man has a notorious dislike for C++, which he repeatedly expressed
    publicly, and not for the reasons you pointed out.

    http://lwn.net/Articles/249460/


    Rui Maciel
    Rui Maciel, Aug 12, 2012
    #5
  6. On 2012-08-12, Rui Maciel wrote:
    > Bernd Nawothnig wrote:
    >
    >> And Linus is for sure not against C++. He himself once tried to use
    >> C++ in the Linux kernel. The experiment was not successful, but that
    >> was only because of memory and CPU limitation in those days. It was
    >> possible to compile the kernel, but that could last for many days
    >> which was considered to be inacceptable.

    >
    > The man has a notorious dislike for C++, which he repeatedly expressed
    > publicly, and not for the reasons you pointed out.
    >
    > http://lwn.net/Articles/249460/


    Oops, you are right. Thanks for the info.




    Bernd

    --
    "Die Antisemiten vergeben es den Juden nicht, dass die Juden Geist
    haben - und Geld." [Friedrich Nietzsche]
    Bernd Nawothnig, Aug 12, 2012
    #6
  7. Jorgen Grahn

    Jorgen Grahn Guest

    On Sat, 2012-08-11, Jorgen Grahn wrote:
    > On Sat, 2012-08-11, Leigh Johnston wrote:
    >> On 11/08/2012 19:44, Jorgen Grahn wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 2012-08-11, Leigh Johnston wrote:
    >>>> Hi,
    >>>>
    >>>> I present "neosigslot" a new, free to use/modify, lightweight signals
    >>>> and slots library that has the following features:
    >>> ...
    >>>> http://i42.co.uk/stuff/neosigslot.htm
    >>>
    >>> Side note: I am a bit surprised that people don't generally use Github
    >>> (or Git in general) for these things. None of the three or so recent
    >>> announcements have pointed to a Git repository.

    >>
    >> Git? Hiss! Boo! The author of Git hates C++!

    >
    > As the saying goes in .se: even a blind hen sometimes finds a corn of
    > grain.


    And rereading that last posting, I see that I got sidetracked by your
    ironic remark.

    My real point is: it's much more convenient and useful to hand out
    version trees to people, than to hand out snapshots of version 1.0,
    1.1 and so on. The connection between your versions and their
    versions is never broken that way. Git lets you do this *and* it
    seems to get accepted in all kinds of environments these days.
    I don't think that has happened before.

    /Jorgen

    --
    // Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
    \X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
    Jorgen Grahn, Aug 12, 2012
    #7
  8. Jorgen Grahn

    Guest

    On Sunday, August 12, 2012 6:21:15 AM UTC-5, Bernd Nawothnig wrote:
    Of course. You can put any data under the control of Git. Git tracks the whole content not specific files.

    -------------------------------------------

    I'm frustrated. I know there are a lot of good
    programmers here, but am perplexed at the
    foolishness of so many. The phrase "under the
    control of Git" is helpful I think for making
    my point. How do you think GitHub would react
    if you want to take part of your project out
    of it's control and make it closed source?
    Would they tell themselves that they have
    nurtured your project and helped you build
    it and now you've betrayed them?

    Currently I have some open source code here --
    http://webEbenezer.net/build_integration.html
    ..
    There's a library and two executables in the
    archive. The executables are the middle and
    front tiers of an on line code generator.
    To be honest, I'm not sure if the middle
    tier will stay open source. Someone with a
    lot of networking experience has hinted
    that is may need to be closed source for
    security reasons. (I don't have plans to
    make the middle tier closed source at this
    time, but could see doing so in the future.)

    At any rate, I would be very cautious about
    what I put into something like GitHub. If
    you later determined the need to make a part
    of it closed source, be prepared for the
    community to react badly to that.

    Brian Wood
    Ebenezer Enterprises
    Making programming fun again
    http://webEbenezer.net


    "There are four character types among people.
    One who says, 'What's mine is mine and what's yours is yours' is of average character, and some say, this is the character of Sodom.
    [One who says] 'What's mine is yours and what's yours is mine' is unlearned (lit., [of] the people of the land).
    [One who says] 'What's mine is yours and what's yours is yours' is pious.
    [One who says] 'What's yours is mine and what's mine is mine' is wicked."
    , Aug 12, 2012
    #8
  9. Jorgen Grahn

    Rui Maciel Guest

    wrote:

    > I'm frustrated. I know there are a lot of good
    > programmers here, but am perplexed at the
    > foolishness of so many. The phrase "under the
    > control of Git" is helpful I think for making
    > my point. How do you think GitHub would react
    > if you want to take part of your project out
    > of it's control and make it closed source?
    > Would they tell themselves that they have
    > nurtured your project and helped you build
    > it and now you've betrayed them?


    As far as I know, GitHub is a for-profit hosting company, which so happens
    to provide a freebie public service for open source projects. Meanwhile, it
    also sells hosting services for private, non-open source projects.[¹] This
    is a good indicator that they don't really care how you license your
    projects.

    In addition, they don't control anything. They host data their users send
    them. They also make no claim regarding intellectual property or copyright
    on any content provided by users.[2] Also, they base their service on a
    tool which was designed to keep track of changes in a decentralized manner,
    without relying on a centralized repository.

    Knowing this, I believe we can agree that your comment is silly and lacks a
    factual basis.


    Rui Maciel

    [¹] https://github.com/plans
    [2] https://help.github.com/articles/github-terms-of-service
    Rui Maciel, Aug 12, 2012
    #9
  10. Jorgen Grahn

    none Guest

    In article <>,
    <> wrote:
    >
    >There's a library and two executables in the
    >archive. The executables are the middle and
    >front tiers of an on line code generator.
    >To be honest, I'm not sure if the middle
    >tier will stay open source. Someone with a
    >lot of networking experience has hinted
    >that is may need to be closed source for
    >security reasons. (I don't have plans to
    >make the middle tier closed source at this
    >time, but could see doing so in the future.)


    Just make sure you are not simply attempting to implement
    security-by-obscurity.

    Yannick
    none, Aug 13, 2012
    #10
  11. Jorgen Grahn

    Guest

    On Sunday, August 12, 2012 2:40:09 PM UTC+3, Rui Maciel wrote:
    > Bernd Nawothnig wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > And Linus is for sure not against C++. ...

    >
    >
    > The man has a notorious dislike for C++, which he repeatedly expressed
    >
    > publicly, and not for the reasons you pointed out.


    It is understandable ... sort of. Good C++ is pure fucking magic for wielders of other languages.

    Most of C compiles with C++ compiler, yes. Still the ideology and common idioms are way too different. C++ has tremendous amount of extensions that donot mix too well with C. When things do not mix then there is a need for wrappers in interfaces between the two. Wrappers usually add code bloat and lower efficiency. It is generally a good idea to keep a code base in one compiled language and in one script language.

    Bashing C++ angrily is one easy way to achieve that no one offers C++ into C project. Doing it fits well with the humorous nature of that old geek. His software is good, well thought out and free so what is the problem?

    I had recently similar experience with a friendly Java team. One of their tools took hours to run and the client was not too happy and funds were found to pay my help. I am weak with Java i wrote C++. It took me a week and half. My version ran under two minutes. It was quite straight no tricks (no aid of GPU or something). They were happy and decided to translate my program into Java themselves. It took two man-weeks of good Java specialist and their version now runs ~10 minutes.

    So they agreed to pay with 5 times efficiency drop and two man-weeks of effort solely to get rid of a risk that they may need to maintain C++ when a change or hot-fix is needed AND i get hit by bus or abducted by aliens. Veryreasonable cost. ;)
    , Aug 19, 2012
    #11
  12. Jorgen Grahn

    Jorgen Grahn Guest

    Linus (was Re: Github (was Re: Free lightweight C++ signals andslots library))

    On Sun, 2012-08-19, wrote:
    ....
    > Bashing C++ angrily is one easy way to achieve that no one offers
    > C++ into C project. Doing it fits well with the humorous nature of
    > that old geek. His software is good, well thought out and free so what
    > is the problem?


    The problem is it helps feeding the prejudice against C++. Newbies
    repeat what Linus says, and old C programmers have another excuse not
    to learn anything new.

    /Jorgen

    --
    // Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
    \X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
    Jorgen Grahn, Aug 21, 2012
    #12
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