Google Wave: A new type of "Ruby Quiz" ?

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Aldric Giacomoni, Nov 16, 2009.

  1. Google Wave is, according to Google, "the new email". It combines email,
    their idea of working together on same documents, and versioning
    control. It has lots of potential.

    I playfully created a simple class for playing cards and decks and
    invited a few people to it, figuring we could reinvent git (because I
    bet we can outsmart Linus, you know?) or at least toy around. Then,
    someone asked if this was the spot for the new Ruby Quiz, and I got this
    idea..
    Instead of several people working separately on a small problem, why
    don't we have several people working together on a slightly bigger
    problem?
    My toy class for cards and decks could become a complete software for
    playing cards online, complete with games, their own sets of rules, etc
    etc.. But if we wait for me to code all this, it'll be a while! If,
    instead, everyone pools in a bit, we can go much farther, much faster.
    That's only one example of a "bigger problem" .. Maybe we just want to
    implement a specific encryption algorithm, or something similar, or
    create an important gem (like a gem to unrar, or something).

    I'm clearly not reinventing anything - but maybe we can test the Wave's
    potential for this. What do you think?
    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Aldric Giacomoni, Nov 16, 2009
    #1
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  2. me too! ( I know, not a google wave address... try
    it anyway. :) )
    Johnathon Wright, Dec 12, 2009
    #2
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  3. I'll hop on the bandwagon too: add me please! ()

    On Sat, Dec 12, 2009 at 3:50 PM, Johnathon Wright <> wrote:
    > me too! ( I know, not a google wave address... try
    > it anyway. :) )
    >
    >




    --
    Kendall Gifford
    Kendall Gifford, Dec 13, 2009
    #3
  4. plase add me
    _______________________
    Agustin Vi=F1ao
    www.agustinvinao.com.ar
    agustinvinao (Skype)


    On Sat, Dec 12, 2009 at 11:30 PM, Kendall Gifford <>wrot=
    e:

    > I'll hop on the bandwagon too: add me please! ()
    >
    > On Sat, Dec 12, 2009 at 3:50 PM, Johnathon Wright <>
    > wrote:
    > > me too! ( I know, not a google wave address... try
    > > it anyway. :) )
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Kendall Gifford
    >
    >
    >
    Agustin Nicolas Viñao Laseras, Dec 13, 2009
    #4
  5. Can you add me,

    2009/12/13 Agustin Nicolas Vi=F1ao Laseras <>:
    > plase add me
    > _______________________
    > =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0Agustin Vi=F1ao
    > www.agustinvinao.com.ar
    > =A0 agustinvinao (Skype)
    >
    >
    > On Sat, Dec 12, 2009 at 11:30 PM, Kendall Gifford <>wr=

    ote:
    >
    >> I'll hop on the bandwagon too: add me please! ()
    >>
    >> On Sat, Dec 12, 2009 at 3:50 PM, Johnathon Wright <>
    >> wrote:
    >> > me too! ( I know, not a google wave address... try
    >> > it anyway. :) )
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Kendall Gifford
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >




    --=20
    -------------------------------------
    Pedro Del Gallego

    Email :
    Pedro Del Gallego, Dec 13, 2009
    #5
  6. Johnathon Wright wrote:
    > me too! ( I know, not a google wave address... try
    > it anyway. :) )


    Didn't work.
    Everyone else should have two new waves.. Unless one of my clicks didn't
    register ;-)
    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Aldric Giacomoni, Dec 14, 2009
    #6
  7. On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 9:51 AM, Aldric Giacomoni <> wrote:
    > Google Wave is, according to Google, "the new email". It combines email,
    > their idea of working together on same documents, and versioning
    > control. It has lots of potential.


    So far, in my experience Google Wave has not worked very well.

    Part of the problem is that it's a confusing muddle of email, and
    wiki. They claim to have (underlying?) version control, but it's not
    obvious other than the ability to 'replay' the history of the wave,
    with no obvious way to recover a previous state.

    A wave is really a document which in the wiki fashion, 'anyone can
    edit', but I've found that users don't really understand that when
    they edit a wave, they are affecting every wave participant's 'copy'
    of the wave, since there really is only one copy.

    I set up a wave for a couple of technical groups, one accrued some
    interesting contents, until someone, thinking of it as 'email' decided
    to clean things up by deleting everything HE had already read. Which
    deleted it for everyone.

    So I'm seeing a lot of people playing with wave with no clear picture
    of how it is intended to be used (I'm including myself in this), and
    Google hasn't as far as I can see given such a picture. I'm not
    really sure that they have one themselves and that wave is still a big
    social experiment to try to figure out what it really SHOULD be.
    There are a few resources going out like Gina Trappani's book on wave,
    but right now, it seems to be worse than the wild wild west, or the
    unexplored sea. It's hard to know where the bandits and dragons are.

    By the way, there are ways to have waves searchable by members of a
    google group (e.g. the google group which follows ruby talk). You can
    actually add the group as a participant using the groups email
    address. Wave will seem to complain about it not being a wave
    address, but it will work, and then members of the group can search
    for the wave with the group: prefix to the search. (I'm doing this
    from memory, so there might be some variations from what I just said,
    but the function is, or at least was, there).




    --
    Rick DeNatale

    Blog: http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RickDeNatale
    WWR: http://www.workingwithrails.com/person/9021-rick-denatale
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rickdenatale
    Rick DeNatale, Dec 14, 2009
    #7
  8. Rick Denatale wrote:
    > On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 9:51 AM, Aldric Giacomoni <>
    > wrote:
    >> Google Wave is, according to Google, "the new email". It combines email,
    >> their idea of working together on same documents, and versioning
    >> control. It has lots of potential.

    >
    > So far, in my experience Google Wave has not worked very well.
    >
    > Part of the problem is that it's a confusing muddle of email, and
    > wiki. They claim to have (underlying?) version control, but it's not
    > obvious other than the ability to 'replay' the history of the wave,
    > with no obvious way to recover a previous state.
    >
    > A wave is really a document which in the wiki fashion, 'anyone can
    > edit', but I've found that users don't really understand that when
    > they edit a wave, they are affecting every wave participant's 'copy'
    > of the wave, since there really is only one copy.
    >
    > I set up a wave for a couple of technical groups, one accrued some
    > interesting contents, until someone, thinking of it as 'email' decided
    > to clean things up by deleting everything HE had already read. Which
    > deleted it for everyone.


    I agree - it's kind of a mish-mash at the moment, and I haven't much
    played with the "replay" function.. If we can go back and forth, we
    really should be able to fork, but it looks like we can't.
    Google is probably a bit like Microsoft when it comes to social
    experiments.. But googlewave is somewhat "mold-breaking" because it
    attempts to establish a new convention. This being said, as it is open
    source, there's a lot of potential for Good(tm) there. People need to
    learn, and that's true of everything.. :)
    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Aldric Giacomoni, Dec 14, 2009
    #8
  9. Aldric Giacomoni

    Mike Peltzer Guest

    Mike Peltzer, Apr 12, 2010
    #9
  10. On 12/14/09, Rick DeNatale <> wrote:
    > So far, in my experience Google Wave has not worked very well.
    >
    > Part of the problem is that it's a confusing muddle of email, and
    > wiki. They claim to have (underlying?) version control, but it's not
    > obvious other than the ability to 'replay' the history of the wave,
    > with no obvious way to recover a previous state.
    >
    > A wave is really a document which in the wiki fashion, 'anyone can
    > edit', but I've found that users don't really understand that when
    > they edit a wave, they are affecting every wave participant's 'copy'
    > of the wave, since there really is only one copy.
    >
    > I set up a wave for a couple of technical groups, one accrued some
    > interesting contents, until someone, thinking of it as 'email' decided
    > to clean things up by deleting everything HE had already read. Which
    > deleted it for everyone.
    >
    > So I'm seeing a lot of people playing with wave with no clear picture
    > of how it is intended to be used (I'm including myself in this), and
    > Google hasn't as far as I can see given such a picture. I'm not
    > really sure that they have one themselves and that wave is still a big
    > social experiment to try to figure out what it really SHOULD be.
    > There are a few resources going out like Gina Trappani's book on wave,
    > but right now, it seems to be worse than the wild wild west, or the
    > unexplored sea. It's hard to know where the bandits and dragons are.
    >
    > By the way, there are ways to have waves searchable by members of a
    > google group (e.g. the google group which follows ruby talk). You can
    > actually add the group as a participant using the groups email
    > address. Wave will seem to complain about it not being a wave
    > address, but it will work, and then members of the group can search
    > for the wave with the group: prefix to the search. (I'm doing this
    > from memory, so there might be some variations from what I just said,
    > but the function is, or at least was, there).


    I read a description of the design of network protocols once which
    noted that simple, to-the-point, successful protocols are succeeded by
    ornate, overcomplicated, overdesigned protocols. Examples: slip was
    followed by ppp, bootp by dhcp, rip by ospf/bgp/isis. (Actually, I
    like both dhcp and ppp myself, and consider them improvements on what
    came before.)

    Clearly the same is true of other areas of technology. Gmail was a
    very successful (or at any rate, popular) service for google, so they
    said, "Ok, good. Now let's turn it up to 11."
    Caleb Clausen, Apr 12, 2010
    #10
  11. Mike Peltzer wrote:
    > if the google wave group is still happening, my id is:
    >
    >
    >
    > thanks!


    I haven't seen anyone online ("onwave" ?) from the original group in a
    while; maybe if someone came up with a new coding idea?
    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Aldric Giacomoni, Apr 12, 2010
    #11
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