GUI Toolkit

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Mark Chandler, Apr 1, 2007.

  1. Which of the cross-platform GUI toolkits has the best documentation, is
    most stable, and is as "native-friendly" as possible? I've been scouring
    around but I keep finding different results and different dates, so I'm
    not sure which to trust.

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Mark Chandler, Apr 1, 2007
    #1
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  2. Mark Chandler

    Damian Guest

    Mark Chandler wrote:
    > Which of the cross-platform GUI toolkits has the best documentation, is
    > most stable, and is as "native-friendly" as possible? I've been scouring
    > around but I keep finding different results and different dates, so I'm
    > not sure which to trust.


    Qt is said to have the best documentation, is stable, very native-friendly and
    as cross-platform as possible (Windows and Linux and OS X).
    Though, I failed to compile qt4-qtruby on my machine. Maybe should have
    downloaded Qt3.
    Gtk+ is also said to be the most mature, native friendly, and have good
    documentation. They say it does very well on Linux and Windows, but there's
    still no native OS X port.

    HTH
    Damian/Three-eyed Fish
    Damian, Apr 1, 2007
    #2
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  3. Damian wrote:
    > Mark Chandler wrote:
    >
    >> Which of the cross-platform GUI toolkits has the best documentation, is
    >> most stable, and is as "native-friendly" as possible? I've been scouring
    >> around but I keep finding different results and different dates, so I'm
    >> not sure which to trust.
    >>

    >
    > Qt is said to have the best documentation, is stable, very native-friendly and
    > as cross-platform as possible (Windows and Linux and OS X).
    > Though, I failed to compile qt4-qtruby on my machine. Maybe should have
    > downloaded Qt3.
    > Gtk+ is also said to be the most mature, native friendly, and have good
    > documentation. They say it does very well on Linux and Windows, but there's
    > still no native OS X port.
    >
    > HTH
    > Damian/Three-eyed Fish
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Ruby/Tk is very stable and works on most platforms. It's not "native
    looking", and the Ruby/Tk documents mostly say, "see the Perl/Tk
    documents for more detail on the widgets". But it's probably the closest
    to a "universal" Ruby GUI that you'll find.

    --
    M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, FBG, AB, PTA, PGS, MS, MNLP, NST, ACMC(P)
    http://borasky-research.blogspot.com/

    If God had meant for carrots to be eaten cooked, He would have given rabbits fire.
    M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, Apr 1, 2007
    #3
  4. On Apr 1, 2007, at 1:12 AM, Mark Chandler wrote:

    > Which of the cross-platform GUI toolkits has the best
    > documentation, is
    > most stable, and is as "native-friendly" as possible? I've been
    > scouring
    > around but I keep finding different results and different dates, so
    > I'm
    > not sure which to trust.


    I attended an excellent talk by Kyle Cordes on this topic recently.
    See http://kylecordes.com/2007/03/31/ruby-gui-toolkits/.
    Mark Volkmann, Apr 1, 2007
    #4
  5. M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:
    > Ruby/Tk is very stable and works on most platforms. It's not "native
    > looking", and the Ruby/Tk documents mostly say, "see the Perl/Tk
    > documents for more detail on the widgets". But it's probably the closest
    > to a "universal" Ruby GUI that you'll find.


    Check out http://tktable.sourceforge.net/tile/ for a tk extension that
    uses 'native widgets' on Windows/Unix/OSX. I'm developing a project at
    work using ruby/tk/tile and it works great. I've had the application
    running on linux, freebsd, netbsd, dragonflybsd, solaris and windows
    2000. I'll be testing windows XP and OSX eventually too, but I don't
    expect many problems.

    It's also not got the 'you must make all your code GPL' thing going on,
    which, along with qt being a heavier toolkit, were the main reasons I
    avoided it for a commerical application. I would have used ruby/gtk but
    gtk doesn't work worth a damn on a mac.

    It doesn't look beautiful, but it looks better than raw tk.

    Andrew

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Andrew Thompson, Apr 1, 2007
    #5
  6. Mark Chandler

    Alex Fenton Guest

    Mark Chandler wrote:
    > Which of the cross-platform GUI toolkits has the best documentation, is
    > most stable, and is as "native-friendly" as possible? I've been scouring
    > around but I keep finding different results and different dates, so I'm
    > not sure which to trust.


    If native is important, you might want to consider WxRuby: http://wxruby.rubyforge.org. It wraps the popular WxWidgets toolkit, which uses completely native controls on the major platforms. Binary gems which install everything you need are available for Windows, OS X and Linux/GTK.

    Historically it has been less stable and complete than the other good toolkits, but the last year has seen a lot of development. Recent releases of wxruby2 have largely complete coverage of the API and people are using them for real work. There's a full ruby class ref and plenty of samples

    I'd recommend using it with WxSugar, which provides a much more rubyish API layer on top of the library.

    a
    Alex Fenton, Apr 2, 2007
    #6
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