Guido at Google

Discussion in 'Python' started by JB, Dec 21, 2005.

  1. JB

    JB Guest

    It seems that our master Guido van Rossum had an offer from google and
    he accepted it!!

    long life to Guido & Goole ! many things to come ;)

    ju²
    JB, Dec 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. JB

    Fuzzyman Guest

    That's potentially very good news. (Or slightly sinister -depending on
    your paranoia levels).

    You got any references on that ?

    I was just thinking that the open source offerings from google are
    actually pretty pitiful - considering the time investment they have put
    into developing software systems. (Summer of Code not-withstanding of
    course).

    I wonder if this heralds google finally upgrading from Python 2.2 ;-)

    All the best,

    Fuzzyman
    http://www.voidspace.org.uk/python/index.shtml
    Fuzzyman, Dec 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. > It seems that our master Guido van Rossum had an offer from google and
    > he accepted it!!


    Isn't Guido-Sans official title BDFL? *wink*

    whatever, if it's true, congratulations and best wishes. Now there is
    one *bot and the BDFL at google, we have still 3 bots in the wild, do
    we?

    Suggesting to name a Rigobot ....


    Harald
    Harald Armin Massa, Dec 21, 2005
    #3
  4. Fuzzyman <> wrote:

    > That's potentially very good news. (Or slightly sinister -depending on
    > your paranoia levels).
    >
    > You got any references on that ?


    I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    sits about 15 meters away from me;-).


    > I was just thinking that the open source offerings from google are
    > actually pretty pitiful - considering the time investment they have put
    > into developing software systems. (Summer of Code not-withstanding of
    > course).


    The key technical person for opensource at Google isn't Guido and isn't
    me -- rather, I'd focus on Greg Stein (whose contributions to open
    source have been very wide-ranging, and who's been our engineering
    manager for opensource for quite a while now... not a secret, you can
    read about that on Greg's own blog). If you want more opensource from
    us, he's most probably the best person to bug about it!-). I'm sure
    that, being the chairman of the Apache Software Foundation (the VP of
    the ASF is also a Google employee), he can bend your ears about that;-).


    > I wonder if this heralds google finally upgrading from Python 2.2 ;-)


    We currently use multiple versions of Python, and I personally don't see
    that changing overnight. But, we'll see.


    Alex
    Alex Martelli, Dec 21, 2005
    #4
  5. JB

    Fuzzyman Guest

    Alex Martelli wrote:
    > Fuzzyman <> wrote:
    >
    > > That's potentially very good news. (Or slightly sinister -depending on
    > > your paranoia levels).
    > >
    > > You got any references on that ?

    >
    > I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    > sits about 15 meters away from me;-).
    >


    Cool - pass on my regards and thanks to him. ;-)

    >
    > > I was just thinking that the open source offerings from google are
    > > actually pretty pitiful - considering the time investment they have put
    > > into developing software systems. (Summer of Code not-withstanding of
    > > course).

    >
    > The key technical person for opensource at Google isn't Guido and isn't
    > me -- rather, I'd focus on Greg Stein (whose contributions to open
    > source have been very wide-ranging, and who's been our engineering
    > manager for opensource for quite a while now... not a secret, you can
    > read about that on Greg's own blog). If you want more opensource from
    > us, he's most probably the best person to bug about it!-). I'm sure
    > that, being the chairman of the Apache Software Foundation (the VP of
    > the ASF is also a Google employee), he can bend your ears about that;-).
    >


    Well, employing key open-source personnel and supporting them in their
    work *probably* counts as helping the open-source world.

    OTOH they (you...) must have worked on/with tremendous systems - like
    load balancing software as one example off the top of my head. I guess
    these are the competitive edge of google - and also there is a lot of
    work turning in house systems into 'released' ones, even if the will is
    there.

    Even so - the code that has been directly released by google is
    relatively slender.

    >
    > > I wonder if this heralds google finally upgrading from Python 2.2 ;-)

    >
    > We currently use multiple versions of Python, and I personally don't see
    > that changing overnight. But, we'll see.
    >


    I've no axe to grind on that one.

    All the best,

    Fuzzyman
    http://www.voidspace.org.uk/python/index.shtml

    >


    > Alex
    Fuzzyman, Dec 21, 2005
    #5
  6. Alex Martelli wrote:
    > Fuzzyman <> wrote:
    >
    > > That's potentially very good news. (Or slightly sinister -depending on
    > > your paranoia levels).
    > >
    > > You got any references on that ?

    >
    > I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    > sits about 15 meters away from me;-).


    Tsk, tsk, all that brainpower sitting so close together. That's not the
    way to do risk management! I think you should suggest scattering
    resources worldwide... now, it just so happens that there's an empty
    five floor building a block and a half from my home...

    By the way, I hear that you've become collegues also with Matt Austern,
    formerly of Apple, and Danny Thorpe, formerly of Borland. I guess we
    mere mortals don't stand a chance of being hired, but if the trend
    continues there are going to be a lot of very interesting positions
    opening everywhere else :)

    Cheers,
    Nicola Musatti
    Nicola Musatti, Dec 21, 2005
    #6
  7. JB

    rbt Guest

    Alex Martelli wrote:
    > I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    > sits about 15 meters away from me;-).


    For Americans: 15 meters is roughly 50 feet.
    rbt, Dec 21, 2005
    #7
  8. Martin P. Hellwig, Dec 21, 2005
    #8
  9. JB

    Kamilche Guest

    Well, congrats to Google! I think they're the lucky ones, to get him,
    and you, both. :)
    Kamilche, Dec 21, 2005
    #9
  10. On Wed, Dec 21, 2005 at 01:36:42PM -0500, rbt wrote:
    > Alex Martelli wrote:
    > > I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    > > sits about 15 meters away from me;-).

    >
    > For Americans: 15 meters is roughly 50 feet.


    Right, so that is about three and a half stone?
    Jack Diederich, Dec 21, 2005
    #10
  11. JB

    Peter Hansen Guest

    rbt wrote:
    > Alex Martelli wrote:
    >
    >>I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    >>sits about 15 meters away from me;-).

    >
    > For Americans: 15 meters is roughly 50 feet.


    Google can do that too, of course. <wink>

    http://www.google.com/search?q=convert 15 meters to feet

    (49.2125984 feet to be more precise)

    -Peter
    Peter Hansen, Dec 21, 2005
    #11
  12. JB

    Peter Hansen Guest

    Jack Diederich wrote:
    > On Wed, Dec 21, 2005 at 01:36:42PM -0500, rbt wrote:
    >
    >>Alex Martelli wrote:
    >>
    >>>I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    >>>sits about 15 meters away from me;-).

    >>
    >>For Americans: 15 meters is roughly 50 feet.

    >
    > Right, so that is about three and a half stone?


    You're probably** thinking of rods, as a stone is a measure of weight.

    http://www.google.com/search?q=convert 15 meters to rods

    --

    ** More likely you're just pulling our legs. :)
    Peter Hansen, Dec 21, 2005
    #12
  13. Jack Diederich wrote:
    > On Wed, Dec 21, 2005 at 01:36:42PM -0500, rbt wrote:
    >
    >>Alex Martelli wrote:
    >>
    >>>I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    >>>sits about 15 meters away from me;-).

    >>
    >>For Americans: 15 meters is roughly 50 feet.

    >
    >
    > Right, so that is about three and a half stone?


    Stone is a measure of weight, not distance. (14 pounds, ~6.35 kg)

    15 meters (150 decimeter, 1500 cm, etc ...)
    590 inches
    49 feet
    16 yards
    0.0093 miles
    0.008 nautical miles
    3 rods
    0.075 furlongs
    1800 barleycorns
    147.63 hands
    66 spans
    33 cubits
    13 ells
    8.2 fathoms
    75 links
    0.75 chains
    0.0027 leauges
    0.03 li
    0.081 stadia
    4.8e-16 parsecs
    1e-10 astronomical units
    5e-8 lightseconds
    2.8e11 Bohr radiuses
    9.2e35 Plank lenghts

    and probably most appropriately (being dutch):

    1.5 roede

    In other words "a stone's throw away".
    Rocco Moretti, Dec 21, 2005
    #13
  14. Rocco Moretti wrote:

    > Jack Diederich wrote:
    > > On Wed, Dec 21, 2005 at 01:36:42PM -0500, rbt wrote:
    > >
    > >>Alex Martelli wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    > >>>sits about 15 meters away from me;-).
    > >>
    > >>For Americans: 15 meters is roughly 50 feet.

    > >
    > >
    > > Right, so that is about three and a half stone?



    > Stone is a measure of weight, not distance. (14 pounds, ~6.35 kg)


    No, _meters_ are a measure of weight.

    15 meters (150 decimeter, 1500 cm, etc ...)
    590 inches
    49 feet
    147.63 hands
    900.7 fingers
    1150.64 toes
    ~3.5 stone

    qed

    geddit?
    Gerard Flanagan, Dec 21, 2005
    #14
  15. JB

    Dave Hansen Guest

    On Wed, 21 Dec 2005 16:14:16 -0600 in comp.lang.python, Rocco Moretti
    <> wrote:

    [...]
    >15 meters (150 decimeter, 1500 cm, etc ...)
    >590 inches
    >49 feet
    >16 yards
    >0.0093 miles
    >0.008 nautical miles
    >3 rods
    >0.075 furlongs
    >1800 barleycorns
    >147.63 hands
    >66 spans
    >33 cubits
    >13 ells
    >8.2 fathoms
    >75 links
    >0.75 chains
    >0.0027 leauges
    >0.03 li
    >0.081 stadia
    >4.8e-16 parsecs
    >1e-10 astronomical units
    >5e-8 lightseconds
    >2.8e11 Bohr radiuses
    >9.2e35 Plank lenghts
    >
    >and probably most appropriately (being dutch):
    >
    >1.5 roede
    >
    >In other words "a stone's throw away".


    You forgot

    8.81419673 smoots

    Regards,

    -=Dave

    --
    Change is inevitable, progress is not.
    Dave Hansen, Dec 21, 2005
    #15
  16. On Wed, 21 Dec 2005 16:40:15 -0500, Peter Hansen <> wrote:

    >rbt wrote:
    >> Alex Martelli wrote:
    >>
    >>>I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    >>>sits about 15 meters away from me;-).

    >>
    >> For Americans: 15 meters is roughly 50 feet.

    >
    >Google can do that too, of course. <wink>
    >
    >http://www.google.com/search?q=convert 15 meters to feet
    >
    >(49.2125984 feet to be more precise)
    >

    Actually that looks like it's based on the approximation
    of 25.4 mm/inch, whereas I believe the legally defined US conversion
    is 39.3700 inches/meter. They're close. British is 39.3701 for some reason.
    At least according to my dusty 37th Edition Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (c) 1955.
    Maybe things have changed since then ;-)

    >>> 15e3/25.4/12

    49.212598425196852

    Appears to be the google number

    But the official conversion

    >>> 1000/39.37

    25.400050800101603

    is not _exactly_ 25.4 mm/inch
    so the distance from Martellibot to BDFL should
    more exactly be

    >>> 15*39.37/12

    49.212499999999999

    Send bug report to google ;-)

    Regards,
    Bengt Richter
    Bengt Richter, Dec 22, 2005
    #16
  17. JB

    Guest

    Nicola Musatti wrote:
    >
    > By the way, I hear that you've become collegues also with Matt Austern,
    > formerly of Apple, and Danny Thorpe, formerly of Borland. I guess we
    > mere mortals don't stand a chance of being hired, but if the trend
    > continues there are going to be a lot of very interesting positions
    > opening everywhere else :)


    Ha! I'm still trying to figure out who let me in. Everyone has some
    chance.
    Of course, I'm going on vacation next week and there was talk
    about a one-way ticket to Mexico.

    The real question is will they let me *back* in? :)

    n
    , Dec 22, 2005
    #17
  18. JB

    Greg Stein Guest

    Yeah... we recognize that we could certainly open-source more of our
    software. While we've released some stuff
    (code.google.com/projects.html), there is a LOT more that we want to
    do. Getting engineers' 20% time to do that has been difficult.
    Thankfully, we know how to fix that and got the okay/headcount to make
    it happen. (IOW, it isn't a lack of desire, but making it happen)

    But even if we haven't been able to open-source as much code as we'd
    like, we *have* been trying to be very supportive of the community.
    Between the Summer of Code and direct cash contributions, we've
    provided a LOT of support to a large number of open source
    organizations.

    And we have a couple other ideas on how to help the open source
    community. We're working on it!

    Cheers,
    -g
    Greg Stein, Dec 22, 2005
    #18
  19. JB

    Peter Hansen Guest

    Bengt Richter wrote:
    [roughly "an inch is not exactly 25.4mm"]
    > At least according to my dusty 37th Edition Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (c) 1955.
    > Maybe things have changed since then ;-)


    Wikipedia concurs with Jim, though it says the official change dates
    from 1958.

    Better throw that old book out, as it's also likely to be missing any
    reference to useful elements such as Lawrencium (1961), and Hassium
    (1984), not to mention Ununnilium, Ununumium and Ununbium (94, 94, 96
    respectively) or the most recently discovered element, which the PSU
    tried to supp
    Peter Hansen, Dec 22, 2005
    #19
  20. On Wed, 21 Dec 2005 13:36:42 -0500, rbt <>
    declaimed the following in comp.lang.python:

    > Alex Martelli wrote:
    > > I don't think there was any official announcement, but it's true -- he
    > > sits about 15 meters away from me;-).

    >
    > For Americans: 15 meters is roughly 50 feet.


    Or a "stone's throw" if things go bad? <G>
    --
    > ============================================================== <
    > | Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber KD6MOG <
    > | Bestiaria Support Staff <
    > ============================================================== <
    > Home Page: <http://www.dm.net/~wulfraed/> <
    > Overflow Page: <http://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/> <
    Dennis Lee Bieber, Dec 22, 2005
    #20
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