Has anyone used "Data Structures and Program Design in C"?

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by gdotone@gmail.com, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. Guest

    ISBN 0-13-725649-3
    copyright 1991 old book ...

    I'm working though the book and would like to discuss some of the examples with someone from time to time. Yes, I could include the authors complete programs for discussion from everyone, but that's a lot of code in some cases.

    Thanks everyone.
     
    , Jul 30, 2012
    #1
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  2. TheGunslinger <> writes:
    > On Mon, 30 Jul 2012 08:09:16 -0700 (PDT), wrote:
    >>ISBN 0-13-725649-3
    >>copyright 1991 old book ...
    >>
    >>I'm working though the book and would like to discuss some of the
    >>examples with someone from time to time. Yes, I could include the
    >>authors complete programs for discussion from everyone, but that's a
    >>lot of code in some cases.

    >
    > I may have a copy packed away in my library, but I am in the process
    > of moving and it is unavailable.
    >
    > However, I would suggest that you might want to update your text to an
    > edition that includes the 2011 ANSI/ISO updates.

    [snip]

    I'm not sure that there are any books out yet that cover the 2011 ISO C
    standard (unless you count the standard itself, of course).

    A book that covers the 1999 standard would likely be better than a book
    from 1991.

    Note that not all compilers even support the 1999 standard; Microsoft in
    particular has expressed a lack of interest in supporting any standard
    past the 1990 one. (Ignore anyone who claims that this statement
    indicates any dislike for C99; it's just something to be aware of.)

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    Will write code for food.
    "We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
    -- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
     
    Keith Thompson, Aug 1, 2012
    #2
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  3. TheGunslinger <> writes:

    > wrote:

    [...]
    >>I'm not sure that there are any books out yet that cover the 2011 ISO C
    >>standard (unless you count the standard itself, of course).
    >>
    >>A book that covers the 1999 standard would likely be better than a book
    >>from 1991.
    >>
    >>Note that not all compilers even support the 1999 standard; Microsoft in
    >>particular has expressed a lack of interest in supporting any standard
    >>past the 1990 one. (Ignore anyone who claims that this statement
    >>indicates any dislike for C99; it's just something to be aware of.)

    >
    > Good point about C99. But I believe there was a C standard update in
    > 2003?


    No. ISO C standards were issued in 1990, 1999, and 2011. An amendment
    was issued in 1995. (The 1990 ISO standard was based on the 1989 ANSI
    standard; after that, all standards were issued directly by ISO.)

    (There was a 2003 standard in C++; if you want to discuss that, try
    comp.std.c++.)

    [...]

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    Will write code for food.
    "We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
    -- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
     
    Keith Thompson, Aug 2, 2012
    #3
  4. Guest

    Thanks everyone for the suggestion to get a more up-to-date book. I will follow that suggestion.

    Is there away to obtain the new standard specifications for C? Well, is the standard freely described somewhere? ANSI sells the standard publication, right?

    I'll check the web for some up-to-date publications, books, on C Data Structures.
    ISBNs would be welcomed. :)

    Again,

    Thanks Everyone.
     
    , Aug 2, 2012
    #4
  5. Jens Gustedt Guest

    Am 02.08.2012 21:22, schrieb :
    > Thanks everyone for the suggestion to get a more up-to-date book. I will follow that suggestion.
    >
    > Is there away to obtain the new standard specifications for C? Well, is the standard freely described somewhere? ANSI sells the standard publication, right?


    You'd find versions that are officially drafts but come very close to
    the final document here:

    http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/nXXXX.pdf

    where you have to replace XXXX by 1570 for the latest standard (C11) and
    1256 for the previous one (C99 plus corigenda).

    Jens
     
    Jens Gustedt, Aug 2, 2012
    #5
  6. James Kuyper Guest

    On 08/02/2012 03:37 PM, Jens Gustedt wrote:
    ....
    > You'd find versions that are officially drafts but come very close to
    > the final document here:
    >
    > http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/nXXXX.pdf
    >
    > where you have to replace XXXX by 1570 for the latest standard (C11) and
    > 1256 for the previous one (C99 plus corigenda).


    Note that 1256 is actually a more useful reference for C99 than the
    documents that you have to pay for, because it's the only document that
    combines C99 with the three technical corrigenda.
     
    James Kuyper, Aug 2, 2012
    #6
  7. TheGunslinger <> writes:
    [...]
    > You can purchase and/or download copies of standard at the NIST or ISO
    > website: (or other support sites)
    >
    > The standard is titled:
    >
    > ISO/IEC 9899:2011
    >
    > Google it and make your choice.
    >
    > Here is one URL that works:
    >
    > http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1570.pdf


    That URL is for a draft of the C11 standard. It should be nearly
    identical to the released standard, but if you want the official
    standard itself you can buy it here:

    http://webstore.ansi.org/RecordDetail.aspx?sku=INCITS/ISO/IEC 9899-2012

    ANSI charges $30 US for the PDF.

    There's also a Technical Corrigendum, available at no charge here:

    http://webstore.ansi.org/RecordDetail.aspx?sku=ISO/IEC 9899/Cor1:2012

    It just corrects the values of __STDC_VERSION__ and __STDC_LIB_EXT1__,
    both of which expand to 201112L.

    I didn't see copies of the standard at the NIST web site.

    ISO sells the C11 standard for 238 Swiss francs (currently $246.14 US).

    It's robably also available from other national standard bodies. I
    don't know whether ANSI sells to non-US customers.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    Will write code for food.
    "We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
    -- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
     
    Keith Thompson, Aug 5, 2012
    #7
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