Hide Java Script

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by kpg, Apr 27, 2005.

  1. kpg

    kpg Guest

    Hello all,

    I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.

    I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    seen by a remote user.

    I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    the actual script?

    The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:

    1) I'm cheap

    2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    to have access to the java script files.

    I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but I
    can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection thingy
    and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might not!).

    Anyway, I'm open to any solution.

    Thanks
    kpg
    kpg, Apr 27, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Hi kpg,

    If the browser can read it, so can you. So can anyone. It is not possible.

    Hey, it's just JavaScript. Nothing worth protecting.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    What You Seek Is What You Get.

    "kpg" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    >
    > I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    > seen by a remote user.
    >
    > I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    > there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    > the actual script?
    >
    > The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >
    > 1) I'm cheap
    >
    > 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    > their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    > to have access to the java script files.
    >
    > I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but I
    > can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection thingy
    > and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might not!).
    >
    > Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >
    > Thanks
    > kpg
    >
    Kevin Spencer, Apr 27, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. kpg

    Josh Guest

    you cant stop anyone whos determined however if you use a frameset you can
    put all of your code into the _top object they'll have a jolly hard time
    getting to it


    "kpg" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    >
    > I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    > seen by a remote user.
    >
    > I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    > there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    > the actual script?
    >
    > The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >
    > 1) I'm cheap
    >
    > 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    > their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    > to have access to the java script files.
    >
    > I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but I
    > can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection thingy
    > and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might not!).
    >
    > Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >
    > Thanks
    > kpg
    >
    Josh, Apr 27, 2005
    #3
  4. You're thinking of the Windows Script Encoder
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...67-C447-4873-B1B0-21F0626A6329&displaylang=en

    It doesn't encrypt the javascript, but it will "keep honest people honest"
    if such a thing can be said.

    "kpg" wrote:

    > Hello all,
    >
    > I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    >
    > I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    > seen by a remote user.
    >
    > I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    > there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    > the actual script?
    >
    > The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >
    > 1) I'm cheap
    >
    > 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    > their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    > to have access to the java script files.
    >
    > I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but I
    > can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection thingy
    > and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might not!).
    >
    > Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >
    > Thanks
    > kpg
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?QnJhZCBRdWlubg==?=, Apr 27, 2005
    #4
  5. kpg

    Mythran Guest

    "Josh" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > you cant stop anyone whos determined however if you use a frameset you can
    > put all of your code into the _top object they'll have a jolly hard time
    > getting to it
    >


    Right-click the frame and go to view-source to view a specific frame. To
    view the top frame, goto View->Source on the file menu to see it...if it's
    disabled, use Mozilla.

    Point is, there is always a way to view the source :)

    Mythran
    Mythran, Apr 27, 2005
    #5
  6. kpg

    David Young Guest

    First of all, you're not crazy. Back in the day, I did some development for
    the Netscape Enterprise Server. It used "Compiled" javascript and came with
    it's own compiler.

    Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here, so, I'm betting
    there's a way to approach this. You know you can set your javascript source
    to a file right? So, what's to prevent us from making that file and aspx
    file that sends content to the browser? Just make sure you set the content
    type before you output it. Next, I would think about how we can prevent the
    aspx file from being rendered by itself. You know, make sure it outputs
    nothing if you typed it directly into the url. Should be easy enough to
    accomplish.

    Perhaps that's a good idea for my next project at home.

    Dave

    "kpg" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    >
    > I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    > seen by a remote user.
    >
    > I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    > there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    > the actual script?
    >
    > The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >
    > 1) I'm cheap
    >
    > 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    > their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    > to have access to the java script files.
    >
    > I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but I
    > can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection thingy
    > and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might not!).
    >
    > Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >
    > Thanks
    > kpg
    >
    David Young, Apr 27, 2005
    #6
  7. kpg

    David Young Guest

    That's interesting! I posted a reply, but when I went to check on it, my
    reader stated that the message was no longer on the server. Then, I
    reloaded the headers and the message was gone alltogether. Anyway, here it
    is again.

    1) Compiled javascript is something that Netscape used in it's Enterprise
    Servers. It came with it's own compiler and, from what I remember, was
    pretty cool to use.

    2) I'm not a quick to dismiss this option as some of my counterparts seem to
    be. Why won't this work? First, you know you can keep you javascript in a
    js file and reference it remotely right? Now just thinking off the top of
    my head, here's two possibilities.
    a) using encryption, encrypt the source file and have your page decrypt it
    when you pull it up. Would be some overhead involved in this, but it will
    work.

    b) Instead of linking to a .js file, link to a .aspx file that sends your js
    source to the output buffer. Just make sure you set the content type. Then
    I would look for a way to make sure that the page renders nothing when you
    pull it up in the browser.

    In other words, there always a way.

    Sounds like an interesting project to work on in my spare time at home.

    Dave

    "kpg" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    >
    > I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    > seen by a remote user.
    >
    > I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    > there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    > the actual script?
    >
    > The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >
    > 1) I'm cheap
    >
    > 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    > their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    > to have access to the java script files.
    >
    > I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but I
    > can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection thingy
    > and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might not!).
    >
    > Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >
    > Thanks
    > kpg
    >
    David Young, Apr 27, 2005
    #7
  8. kpg

    kpg Guest

    Well I got both your messages!

    Thanks for the input. You gave me something to think about.

    --
    kpg
    kpg, Apr 27, 2005
    #8
  9. Do honest people NEED to be kept honest?

    Do well people need a doctor?

    Does a PHD need a high school education?

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    What You Seek Is What You Get.

    "Brad Quinn" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > You're thinking of the Windows Script Encoder.
    > http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...67-C447-4873-B1B0-21F0626A6329&displaylang=en
    >
    > It doesn't encrypt the javascript, but it will "keep honest people honest"
    > if such a thing can be said.
    >
    > "kpg" wrote:
    >
    >> Hello all,
    >>
    >> I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    >>
    >> I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    >> seen by a remote user.
    >>
    >> I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    >> there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    >> the actual script?
    >>
    >> The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >>
    >> 1) I'm cheap
    >>
    >> 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    >> their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    >> to have access to the java script files.
    >>
    >> I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but I
    >> can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection
    >> thingy
    >> and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might not!).
    >>
    >> Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> kpg
    >>
    >>
    Kevin Spencer, Apr 27, 2005
    #9
  10. > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here

    Anyone who is open-minded about what they do know knows nothing. For
    example, solve the following arithmentic problem:

    1 + 2 = ?

    Now, when I was 3 years old I was entitled to be open-minded about the
    answer to that question. If I were open-minded about it now, I would be a
    fool.

    IOW, just because you don't know something doesn't make your open-mindedness
    a virtue.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    What You Seek Is What You Get.

    "David Young" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > First of all, you're not crazy. Back in the day, I did some development
    > for
    > the Netscape Enterprise Server. It used "Compiled" javascript and came
    > with
    > it's own compiler.
    >
    > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here, so, I'm betting
    > there's a way to approach this. You know you can set your javascript
    > source
    > to a file right? So, what's to prevent us from making that file and aspx
    > file that sends content to the browser? Just make sure you set the
    > content
    > type before you output it. Next, I would think about how we can prevent
    > the
    > aspx file from being rendered by itself. You know, make sure it outputs
    > nothing if you typed it directly into the url. Should be easy enough to
    > accomplish.
    >
    > Perhaps that's a good idea for my next project at home.
    >
    > Dave
    >
    > "kpg" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> Hello all,
    >>
    >> I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    >>
    >> I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    >> seen by a remote user.
    >>
    >> I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    >> there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    >> the actual script?
    >>
    >> The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >>
    >> 1) I'm cheap
    >>
    >> 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    >> their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    >> to have access to the java script files.
    >>
    >> I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but I
    >> can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection
    >> thingy
    >> and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might not!).
    >>
    >> Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> kpg
    >>

    >
    >
    Kevin Spencer, Apr 27, 2005
    #10
  11. kpg

    kpg Guest

    > Do honest people NEED to be kept honest?
    Yes.

    > Do well people need a doctor?

    Only if you have an HMO.

    > Does a PHD need a high school education?

    From schools today? Probably No.

    Does my Java Script NEED protecting?
    No. But my boss wants it protected.

    Am I going to tell him it can't be done?
    I haven't decided on that yet.

    kpg
    kpg, Apr 27, 2005
    #11
  12. kpg

    David Young Guest

    I shudder to think what this world would be like if we all had the same
    opinion as you did.

    Keeping an open mind is what gives birth to invention and discovery. I
    doesn't matter what you know or know not, all that matters is that there are
    people out there who look at a problem and say. You know, I bet there's a
    way to get around that. You go ahead and say it can't be done while I find
    a way to do it. And as for the why? Because I Can!

    So, you continue to be closed minded and I'll continue to be an open-minded
    "fool".

    cheers.

    "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here

    >
    > Anyone who is open-minded about what they do know knows nothing. For
    > example, solve the following arithmentic problem:
    >
    > 1 + 2 = ?
    >
    > Now, when I was 3 years old I was entitled to be open-minded about the
    > answer to that question. If I were open-minded about it now, I would be a
    > fool.
    >
    > IOW, just because you don't know something doesn't make your

    open-mindedness
    > a virtue.
    >
    > --
    > HTH,
    >
    > Kevin Spencer
    > Microsoft MVP
    > .Net Developer
    > What You Seek Is What You Get.
    >
    > "David Young" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > First of all, you're not crazy. Back in the day, I did some development
    > > for
    > > the Netscape Enterprise Server. It used "Compiled" javascript and came
    > > with
    > > it's own compiler.
    > >
    > > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here, so, I'm

    betting
    > > there's a way to approach this. You know you can set your javascript
    > > source
    > > to a file right? So, what's to prevent us from making that file and

    aspx
    > > file that sends content to the browser? Just make sure you set the
    > > content
    > > type before you output it. Next, I would think about how we can prevent
    > > the
    > > aspx file from being rendered by itself. You know, make sure it outputs
    > > nothing if you typed it directly into the url. Should be easy enough to
    > > accomplish.
    > >
    > > Perhaps that's a good idea for my next project at home.
    > >
    > > Dave
    > >
    > > "kpg" <> wrote in message
    > > news:%...
    > >> Hello all,
    > >>
    > >> I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    > >>
    > >> I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    > >> seen by a remote user.
    > >>
    > >> I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    > >> there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    > >> the actual script?
    > >>
    > >> The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    > >>
    > >> 1) I'm cheap
    > >>
    > >> 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    > >> their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    > >> to have access to the java script files.
    > >>
    > >> I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but I
    > >> can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection
    > >> thingy
    > >> and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might

    not!).
    > >>
    > >> Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks
    > >> kpg
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    David Young, Apr 27, 2005
    #12
  13. Hi David,

    I was afraid you would misunderstand me. I wasn't calling YOU a fool. I was
    saying that if I know something, and act like I don't then I am a fool. I
    don't blame you at all for being open-minded. When you don't know something,
    that is the right way to be. When one DOES know something, such as whether
    you can hide or obfuscate JavaScript succesfully (and I do know that), one
    would be a fool to say that one does not.

    IOW, you are right to be open-minded about this, and I am right to be
    close-minded about it.

    Old saying (can't attribute the author):

    "He who knows not, and knows not that he knows not is a fool. Shun him.
    He who knows not, and knows that he knows not, is a student. Teach him.
    He who knows, and knows not that he knows, is asleep. Wake him.
    He who knows, and knows that he knows, is wise. Follow him."

    Friends? :)

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    What You Seek Is What You Get.


    "David Young" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I shudder to think what this world would be like if we all had the same
    > opinion as you did.
    >
    > Keeping an open mind is what gives birth to invention and discovery. I
    > doesn't matter what you know or know not, all that matters is that there
    > are
    > people out there who look at a problem and say. You know, I bet there's a
    > way to get around that. You go ahead and say it can't be done while I
    > find
    > a way to do it. And as for the why? Because I Can!
    >
    > So, you continue to be closed minded and I'll continue to be an
    > open-minded
    > "fool".
    >
    > cheers.
    >
    > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here

    >>
    >> Anyone who is open-minded about what they do know knows nothing. For
    >> example, solve the following arithmentic problem:
    >>
    >> 1 + 2 = ?
    >>
    >> Now, when I was 3 years old I was entitled to be open-minded about the
    >> answer to that question. If I were open-minded about it now, I would be a
    >> fool.
    >>
    >> IOW, just because you don't know something doesn't make your

    > open-mindedness
    >> a virtue.
    >>
    >> --
    >> HTH,
    >>
    >> Kevin Spencer
    >> Microsoft MVP
    >> .Net Developer
    >> What You Seek Is What You Get.
    >>
    >> "David Young" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > First of all, you're not crazy. Back in the day, I did some
    >> > development
    >> > for
    >> > the Netscape Enterprise Server. It used "Compiled" javascript and came
    >> > with
    >> > it's own compiler.
    >> >
    >> > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here, so, I'm

    > betting
    >> > there's a way to approach this. You know you can set your javascript
    >> > source
    >> > to a file right? So, what's to prevent us from making that file and

    > aspx
    >> > file that sends content to the browser? Just make sure you set the
    >> > content
    >> > type before you output it. Next, I would think about how we can
    >> > prevent
    >> > the
    >> > aspx file from being rendered by itself. You know, make sure it
    >> > outputs
    >> > nothing if you typed it directly into the url. Should be easy enough
    >> > to
    >> > accomplish.
    >> >
    >> > Perhaps that's a good idea for my next project at home.
    >> >
    >> > Dave
    >> >
    >> > "kpg" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:%...
    >> >> Hello all,
    >> >>
    >> >> I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    >> >>
    >> >> I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    >> >> seen by a remote user.
    >> >>
    >> >> I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    >> >> there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    >> >> the actual script?
    >> >>
    >> >> The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >> >>
    >> >> 1) I'm cheap
    >> >>
    >> >> 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    >> >> their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    >> >> to have access to the java script files.
    >> >>
    >> >> I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but
    >> >> I
    >> >> can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection
    >> >> thingy
    >> >> and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might

    > not!).
    >> >>
    >> >> Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >> >>
    >> >> Thanks
    >> >> kpg
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    Kevin Spencer, Apr 27, 2005
    #13
  14. kpg

    David Young Guest

    Ok, here's your solution:

    Create an aspx page. Call it "JSSource.aspx"
    Open the HTML view and delete everything except the contents of the <@ Page>
    directive.
    Open the Code Behind for this page.
    Add two using statements:
    using System.Text;
    using System.IO;
    Add the following to the Page_Load handler:
    private void Page_Load(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    {
    // Put user code to initialize the page here
    string script;
    StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder();
    b.Append("function doOnLoad(){");
    b.Append("alert('hello there');}");

    if(Request.UrlReferrer==null||Request.UrlReferrer.Host!="localhost")
    script = "var youbite = 'eat me';";
    else
    script = b.ToString();

    ASCIIEncoding encoder = new ASCIIEncoding();
    byte[] buffer = encoder.GetBytes(script);
    Response.ContentType = "text/javascript";
    Response.OutputStream.Write(buffer,0,buffer.Length);
    }

    Then create a new aspx page. Call it JSClient.aspx
    Open the HTML View and add the following betweent the </HEAD> and <BODY>
    tags.
    <script Language="javascript" type="text/css" src="JSSource.aspx"></script>
    in the Body tag, add the following onLoad="doOnLoad();"

    Then create a third page. Call it "Launch.aspx" add a hyperlink control, or
    a simple <A href> tag. the NavigateUrl = "JSClient.aspx"

    Build and launch the "Launch.aspx" page. When you click on the link, it'll
    load the JSClient.aspx page and you should get a nice little Hello World
    popup.

    Enhance as you see fit. Another think you may want to think about is
    caching. You may want to make sure to add directives to prevent the browser
    from caching the JSSource.aspx page. Also, if it's being deployed on a
    client site, they could open the site's dll with something lik Reflector and
    see your source, so you might want to obfuscate that.

    It's a little simple I agree, but it's the best I could come up with on such
    short notice.

    BTW - Never accept never as an answer. When they say it can't be done, be
    like me and say why not. Sometimes ignorance is bliss.

    Dave


    "kpg" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    >
    > I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    > seen by a remote user.
    >
    > I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    > there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    > the actual script?
    >
    > The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >
    > 1) I'm cheap
    >
    > 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    > their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    > to have access to the java script files.
    >
    > I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server, but I
    > can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection thingy
    > and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might not!).
    >
    > Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >
    > Thanks
    > kpg
    >
    David Young, Apr 27, 2005
    #14
  15. kpg

    David Young Guest

    Oh, I understand perfectly. You are saying that since I don't know any
    better, it's ok to be "open-minded".

    You also said that since you already know that it is not possible to do what
    he asked, then in your case, it's ok to be "closed-minded", because you know
    it can't be done (and you do know that).

    I really appreciate you clearing all that up for me. Next time, I guess
    I'll know better.

    Friends?;)



    "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Hi David,
    >
    > I was afraid you would misunderstand me. I wasn't calling YOU a fool. I

    was
    > saying that if I know something, and act like I don't then I am a fool. I
    > don't blame you at all for being open-minded. When you don't know

    something,
    > that is the right way to be. When one DOES know something, such as whether
    > you can hide or obfuscate JavaScript succesfully (and I do know that), one
    > would be a fool to say that one does not.
    >
    > IOW, you are right to be open-minded about this, and I am right to be
    > close-minded about it.
    >
    > Old saying (can't attribute the author):
    >
    > "He who knows not, and knows not that he knows not is a fool. Shun him.
    > He who knows not, and knows that he knows not, is a student. Teach him.
    > He who knows, and knows not that he knows, is asleep. Wake him.
    > He who knows, and knows that he knows, is wise. Follow him."
    >
    > Friends? :)
    >
    > --
    > HTH,
    >
    > Kevin Spencer
    > Microsoft MVP
    > .Net Developer
    > What You Seek Is What You Get.
    >
    >
    > "David Young" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I shudder to think what this world would be like if we all had the same
    > > opinion as you did.
    > >
    > > Keeping an open mind is what gives birth to invention and discovery. I
    > > doesn't matter what you know or know not, all that matters is that there
    > > are
    > > people out there who look at a problem and say. You know, I bet there's

    a
    > > way to get around that. You go ahead and say it can't be done while I
    > > find
    > > a way to do it. And as for the why? Because I Can!
    > >
    > > So, you continue to be closed minded and I'll continue to be an
    > > open-minded
    > > "fool".
    > >
    > > cheers.
    > >
    > > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > > news:%...
    > >> > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here
    > >>
    > >> Anyone who is open-minded about what they do know knows nothing. For
    > >> example, solve the following arithmentic problem:
    > >>
    > >> 1 + 2 = ?
    > >>
    > >> Now, when I was 3 years old I was entitled to be open-minded about the
    > >> answer to that question. If I were open-minded about it now, I would be

    a
    > >> fool.
    > >>
    > >> IOW, just because you don't know something doesn't make your

    > > open-mindedness
    > >> a virtue.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> HTH,
    > >>
    > >> Kevin Spencer
    > >> Microsoft MVP
    > >> .Net Developer
    > >> What You Seek Is What You Get.
    > >>
    > >> "David Young" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> > First of all, you're not crazy. Back in the day, I did some
    > >> > development
    > >> > for
    > >> > the Netscape Enterprise Server. It used "Compiled" javascript and

    came
    > >> > with
    > >> > it's own compiler.
    > >> >
    > >> > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here, so, I'm

    > > betting
    > >> > there's a way to approach this. You know you can set your javascript
    > >> > source
    > >> > to a file right? So, what's to prevent us from making that file and

    > > aspx
    > >> > file that sends content to the browser? Just make sure you set the
    > >> > content
    > >> > type before you output it. Next, I would think about how we can
    > >> > prevent
    > >> > the
    > >> > aspx file from being rendered by itself. You know, make sure it
    > >> > outputs
    > >> > nothing if you typed it directly into the url. Should be easy enough
    > >> > to
    > >> > accomplish.
    > >> >
    > >> > Perhaps that's a good idea for my next project at home.
    > >> >
    > >> > Dave
    > >> >
    > >> > "kpg" <> wrote in message
    > >> > news:%...
    > >> >> Hello all,
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    > >> >> seen by a remote user.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    > >> >> there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    > >> >> the actual script?
    > >> >>
    > >> >> The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> 1) I'm cheap
    > >> >>
    > >> >> 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    > >> >> their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their customers
    > >> >> to have access to the java script files.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server,

    but
    > >> >> I
    > >> >> can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection
    > >> >> thingy
    > >> >> and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might

    > > not!).
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Thanks
    > >> >> kpg
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    David Young, Apr 27, 2005
    #15
  16. Your solution has been tried before. Many times.

    Don't forget, Columbus only discovered America for those that didn't already
    know it was there (like the Indians).

    I don't cliam to know everything. I simply claim to know what I do know of
    what is already known.

    Ignorance may be bliss, but knowledge is power. I'll settle for bliss when
    I'm sleeping, and when I die. Until then, I have too many responsibilities
    that require knowledge to fulfill. And I take my responsiblities seriously.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    What You Seek Is What You Get.

    "David Young" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Oh, I understand perfectly. You are saying that since I don't know any
    > better, it's ok to be "open-minded".
    >
    > You also said that since you already know that it is not possible to do
    > what
    > he asked, then in your case, it's ok to be "closed-minded", because you
    > know
    > it can't be done (and you do know that).
    >
    > I really appreciate you clearing all that up for me. Next time, I guess
    > I'll know better.
    >
    > Friends?;)
    >
    >
    >
    > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> Hi David,
    >>
    >> I was afraid you would misunderstand me. I wasn't calling YOU a fool. I

    > was
    >> saying that if I know something, and act like I don't then I am a fool. I
    >> don't blame you at all for being open-minded. When you don't know

    > something,
    >> that is the right way to be. When one DOES know something, such as
    >> whether
    >> you can hide or obfuscate JavaScript succesfully (and I do know that),
    >> one
    >> would be a fool to say that one does not.
    >>
    >> IOW, you are right to be open-minded about this, and I am right to be
    >> close-minded about it.
    >>
    >> Old saying (can't attribute the author):
    >>
    >> "He who knows not, and knows not that he knows not is a fool. Shun him.
    >> He who knows not, and knows that he knows not, is a student. Teach him.
    >> He who knows, and knows not that he knows, is asleep. Wake him.
    >> He who knows, and knows that he knows, is wise. Follow him."
    >>
    >> Friends? :)
    >>
    >> --
    >> HTH,
    >>
    >> Kevin Spencer
    >> Microsoft MVP
    >> .Net Developer
    >> What You Seek Is What You Get.
    >>
    >>
    >> "David Young" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> >I shudder to think what this world would be like if we all had the same
    >> > opinion as you did.
    >> >
    >> > Keeping an open mind is what gives birth to invention and discovery. I
    >> > doesn't matter what you know or know not, all that matters is that
    >> > there
    >> > are
    >> > people out there who look at a problem and say. You know, I bet
    >> > there's

    > a
    >> > way to get around that. You go ahead and say it can't be done while I
    >> > find
    >> > a way to do it. And as for the why? Because I Can!
    >> >
    >> > So, you continue to be closed minded and I'll continue to be an
    >> > open-minded
    >> > "fool".
    >> >
    >> > cheers.
    >> >
    >> > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:%...
    >> >> > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here
    >> >>
    >> >> Anyone who is open-minded about what they do know knows nothing. For
    >> >> example, solve the following arithmentic problem:
    >> >>
    >> >> 1 + 2 = ?
    >> >>
    >> >> Now, when I was 3 years old I was entitled to be open-minded about the
    >> >> answer to that question. If I were open-minded about it now, I would
    >> >> be

    > a
    >> >> fool.
    >> >>
    >> >> IOW, just because you don't know something doesn't make your
    >> > open-mindedness
    >> >> a virtue.
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> HTH,
    >> >>
    >> >> Kevin Spencer
    >> >> Microsoft MVP
    >> >> .Net Developer
    >> >> What You Seek Is What You Get.
    >> >>
    >> >> "David Young" <> wrote in message
    >> >> news:...
    >> >> > First of all, you're not crazy. Back in the day, I did some
    >> >> > development
    >> >> > for
    >> >> > the Netscape Enterprise Server. It used "Compiled" javascript and

    > came
    >> >> > with
    >> >> > it's own compiler.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here, so, I'm
    >> > betting
    >> >> > there's a way to approach this. You know you can set your
    >> >> > javascript
    >> >> > source
    >> >> > to a file right? So, what's to prevent us from making that file and
    >> > aspx
    >> >> > file that sends content to the browser? Just make sure you set the
    >> >> > content
    >> >> > type before you output it. Next, I would think about how we can
    >> >> > prevent
    >> >> > the
    >> >> > aspx file from being rendered by itself. You know, make sure it
    >> >> > outputs
    >> >> > nothing if you typed it directly into the url. Should be easy
    >> >> > enough
    >> >> > to
    >> >> > accomplish.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Perhaps that's a good idea for my next project at home.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Dave
    >> >> >
    >> >> > "kpg" <> wrote in message
    >> >> > news:%...
    >> >> >> Hello all,
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    >> >> >> seen by a remote user.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember that
    >> >> >> there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    >> >> >> the actual script?
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> 1) I'm cheap
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    >> >> >> their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their
    >> >> >> customers
    >> >> >> to have access to the java script files.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server,

    > but
    >> >> >> I
    >> >> >> can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party protection
    >> >> >> thingy
    >> >> >> and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they might
    >> > not!).
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Thanks
    >> >> >> kpg
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    Kevin Spencer, Apr 28, 2005
    #16
  17. kpg

    David Young Guest

    I guess I just don't understand you then. You told KPG that what he wanted
    to do was not possible. You ridicule me for saying that we should keep an
    open mind about it. I post a solution that WORKS and you say it's been
    tried that way before.

    If you knew of the solution, why didn't you just post it in the first place
    instead of telling him it couldn't be done?

    "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    news:OApq0m%...
    > Your solution has been tried before. Many times.
    >
    > Don't forget, Columbus only discovered America for those that didn't

    already
    > know it was there (like the Indians).
    >
    > I don't cliam to know everything. I simply claim to know what I do know of
    > what is already known.
    >
    > Ignorance may be bliss, but knowledge is power. I'll settle for bliss when
    > I'm sleeping, and when I die. Until then, I have too many responsibilities
    > that require knowledge to fulfill. And I take my responsiblities

    seriously.
    >
    > --
    > HTH,
    >
    > Kevin Spencer
    > Microsoft MVP
    > .Net Developer
    > What You Seek Is What You Get.
    >
    > "David Young" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Oh, I understand perfectly. You are saying that since I don't know any
    > > better, it's ok to be "open-minded".
    > >
    > > You also said that since you already know that it is not possible to do
    > > what
    > > he asked, then in your case, it's ok to be "closed-minded", because you
    > > know
    > > it can't be done (and you do know that).
    > >
    > > I really appreciate you clearing all that up for me. Next time, I guess
    > > I'll know better.
    > >
    > > Friends?;)
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > > news:%...
    > >> Hi David,
    > >>
    > >> I was afraid you would misunderstand me. I wasn't calling YOU a fool. I

    > > was
    > >> saying that if I know something, and act like I don't then I am a fool.

    I
    > >> don't blame you at all for being open-minded. When you don't know

    > > something,
    > >> that is the right way to be. When one DOES know something, such as
    > >> whether
    > >> you can hide or obfuscate JavaScript succesfully (and I do know that),
    > >> one
    > >> would be a fool to say that one does not.
    > >>
    > >> IOW, you are right to be open-minded about this, and I am right to be
    > >> close-minded about it.
    > >>
    > >> Old saying (can't attribute the author):
    > >>
    > >> "He who knows not, and knows not that he knows not is a fool. Shun him.
    > >> He who knows not, and knows that he knows not, is a student. Teach him.
    > >> He who knows, and knows not that he knows, is asleep. Wake him.
    > >> He who knows, and knows that he knows, is wise. Follow him."
    > >>
    > >> Friends? :)
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> HTH,
    > >>
    > >> Kevin Spencer
    > >> Microsoft MVP
    > >> .Net Developer
    > >> What You Seek Is What You Get.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> "David Young" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> >I shudder to think what this world would be like if we all had the

    same
    > >> > opinion as you did.
    > >> >
    > >> > Keeping an open mind is what gives birth to invention and discovery.

    I
    > >> > doesn't matter what you know or know not, all that matters is that
    > >> > there
    > >> > are
    > >> > people out there who look at a problem and say. You know, I bet
    > >> > there's

    > > a
    > >> > way to get around that. You go ahead and say it can't be done while

    I
    > >> > find
    > >> > a way to do it. And as for the why? Because I Can!
    > >> >
    > >> > So, you continue to be closed minded and I'll continue to be an
    > >> > open-minded
    > >> > "fool".
    > >> >
    > >> > cheers.
    > >> >
    > >> > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > >> > news:%...
    > >> >> > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Anyone who is open-minded about what they do know knows nothing. For


    > >> >> example, solve the following arithmentic problem:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> 1 + 2 = ?
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Now, when I was 3 years old I was entitled to be open-minded about

    the
    > >> >> answer to that question. If I were open-minded about it now, I would
    > >> >> be

    > > a
    > >> >> fool.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> IOW, just because you don't know something doesn't make your
    > >> > open-mindedness
    > >> >> a virtue.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> --
    > >> >> HTH,
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Kevin Spencer
    > >> >> Microsoft MVP
    > >> >> .Net Developer
    > >> >> What You Seek Is What You Get.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> "David Young" <> wrote in message
    > >> >> news:...
    > >> >> > First of all, you're not crazy. Back in the day, I did some
    > >> >> > development
    > >> >> > for
    > >> >> > the Netscape Enterprise Server. It used "Compiled" javascript and

    > > came
    > >> >> > with
    > >> >> > it's own compiler.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here, so, I'm
    > >> > betting
    > >> >> > there's a way to approach this. You know you can set your
    > >> >> > javascript
    > >> >> > source
    > >> >> > to a file right? So, what's to prevent us from making that file

    and
    > >> > aspx
    > >> >> > file that sends content to the browser? Just make sure you set

    the
    > >> >> > content
    > >> >> > type before you output it. Next, I would think about how we can
    > >> >> > prevent
    > >> >> > the
    > >> >> > aspx file from being rendered by itself. You know, make sure it
    > >> >> > outputs
    > >> >> > nothing if you typed it directly into the url. Should be easy
    > >> >> > enough
    > >> >> > to
    > >> >> > accomplish.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Perhaps that's a good idea for my next project at home.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Dave
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > "kpg" <> wrote in message
    > >> >> > news:%...
    > >> >> >> Hello all,
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script files.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    > >> >> >> seen by a remote user.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember

    that
    > >> >> >> there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    > >> >> >> the actual script?
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> 1) I'm cheap
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use by
    > >> >> >> their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their
    > >> >> >> customers
    > >> >> >> to have access to the java script files.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my server,

    > > but
    > >> >> >> I
    > >> >> >> can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party

    protection
    > >> >> >> thingy
    > >> >> >> and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they

    might
    > >> > not!).
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> Thanks
    > >> >> >> kpg
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    David Young, Apr 28, 2005
    #17
  18. Hi David,

    First, I didn't ridicule you.

    Second, your solution doesn't "work." It can be circumvented just like all
    the others.

    Third, I said it had been tried. I didn't say succesfully. If it had been
    tried successfully, I would not have said that there is no solution. There
    is no solution. I could go into details (there are excellent technical
    reasons why it can't be done), but this is all old history. Only interesting
    to someone that hasn't heard it all before. And most of the rest of us have
    heard it all before. We're Indians. You're Columbus. Welcome to the New
    World.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    What You Seek Is What You Get.

    "David Young" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I guess I just don't understand you then. You told KPG that what he wanted
    > to do was not possible. You ridicule me for saying that we should keep an
    > open mind about it. I post a solution that WORKS and you say it's been
    > tried that way before.
    >
    > If you knew of the solution, why didn't you just post it in the first
    > place
    > instead of telling him it couldn't be done?
    >
    > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > news:OApq0m%...
    >> Your solution has been tried before. Many times.
    >>
    >> Don't forget, Columbus only discovered America for those that didn't

    > already
    >> know it was there (like the Indians).
    >>
    >> I don't cliam to know everything. I simply claim to know what I do know
    >> of
    >> what is already known.
    >>
    >> Ignorance may be bliss, but knowledge is power. I'll settle for bliss
    >> when
    >> I'm sleeping, and when I die. Until then, I have too many
    >> responsibilities
    >> that require knowledge to fulfill. And I take my responsiblities

    > seriously.
    >>
    >> --
    >> HTH,
    >>
    >> Kevin Spencer
    >> Microsoft MVP
    >> .Net Developer
    >> What You Seek Is What You Get.
    >>
    >> "David Young" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Oh, I understand perfectly. You are saying that since I don't know any
    >> > better, it's ok to be "open-minded".
    >> >
    >> > You also said that since you already know that it is not possible to do
    >> > what
    >> > he asked, then in your case, it's ok to be "closed-minded", because you
    >> > know
    >> > it can't be done (and you do know that).
    >> >
    >> > I really appreciate you clearing all that up for me. Next time, I
    >> > guess
    >> > I'll know better.
    >> >
    >> > Friends?;)
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:%...
    >> >> Hi David,
    >> >>
    >> >> I was afraid you would misunderstand me. I wasn't calling YOU a fool.
    >> >> I
    >> > was
    >> >> saying that if I know something, and act like I don't then I am a
    >> >> fool.

    > I
    >> >> don't blame you at all for being open-minded. When you don't know
    >> > something,
    >> >> that is the right way to be. When one DOES know something, such as
    >> >> whether
    >> >> you can hide or obfuscate JavaScript succesfully (and I do know that),
    >> >> one
    >> >> would be a fool to say that one does not.
    >> >>
    >> >> IOW, you are right to be open-minded about this, and I am right to be
    >> >> close-minded about it.
    >> >>
    >> >> Old saying (can't attribute the author):
    >> >>
    >> >> "He who knows not, and knows not that he knows not is a fool. Shun
    >> >> him.
    >> >> He who knows not, and knows that he knows not, is a student. Teach
    >> >> him.
    >> >> He who knows, and knows not that he knows, is asleep. Wake him.
    >> >> He who knows, and knows that he knows, is wise. Follow him."
    >> >>
    >> >> Friends? :)
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> HTH,
    >> >>
    >> >> Kevin Spencer
    >> >> Microsoft MVP
    >> >> .Net Developer
    >> >> What You Seek Is What You Get.
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> "David Young" <> wrote in message
    >> >> news:...
    >> >> >I shudder to think what this world would be like if we all had the

    > same
    >> >> > opinion as you did.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Keeping an open mind is what gives birth to invention and discovery.

    > I
    >> >> > doesn't matter what you know or know not, all that matters is that
    >> >> > there
    >> >> > are
    >> >> > people out there who look at a problem and say. You know, I bet
    >> >> > there's
    >> > a
    >> >> > way to get around that. You go ahead and say it can't be done while

    > I
    >> >> > find
    >> >> > a way to do it. And as for the why? Because I Can!
    >> >> >
    >> >> > So, you continue to be closed minded and I'll continue to be an
    >> >> > open-minded
    >> >> > "fool".
    >> >> >
    >> >> > cheers.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    >> >> > news:%...
    >> >> >> > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Anyone who is open-minded about what they do know knows nothing.
    >> >> >> For

    >
    >> >> >> example, solve the following arithmentic problem:
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> 1 + 2 = ?
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Now, when I was 3 years old I was entitled to be open-minded about

    > the
    >> >> >> answer to that question. If I were open-minded about it now, I
    >> >> >> would
    >> >> >> be
    >> > a
    >> >> >> fool.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> IOW, just because you don't know something doesn't make your
    >> >> > open-mindedness
    >> >> >> a virtue.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> --
    >> >> >> HTH,
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Kevin Spencer
    >> >> >> Microsoft MVP
    >> >> >> .Net Developer
    >> >> >> What You Seek Is What You Get.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> "David Young" <> wrote in message
    >> >> >> news:...
    >> >> >> > First of all, you're not crazy. Back in the day, I did some
    >> >> >> > development
    >> >> >> > for
    >> >> >> > the Netscape Enterprise Server. It used "Compiled" javascript
    >> >> >> > and
    >> > came
    >> >> >> > with
    >> >> >> > it's own compiler.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > Now, I'm not as closed minded as some of the others here, so, I'm
    >> >> > betting
    >> >> >> > there's a way to approach this. You know you can set your
    >> >> >> > javascript
    >> >> >> > source
    >> >> >> > to a file right? So, what's to prevent us from making that file

    > and
    >> >> > aspx
    >> >> >> > file that sends content to the browser? Just make sure you set

    > the
    >> >> >> > content
    >> >> >> > type before you output it. Next, I would think about how we can
    >> >> >> > prevent
    >> >> >> > the
    >> >> >> > aspx file from being rendered by itself. You know, make sure it
    >> >> >> > outputs
    >> >> >> > nothing if you typed it directly into the url. Should be easy
    >> >> >> > enough
    >> >> >> > to
    >> >> >> > accomplish.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > Perhaps that's a good idea for my next project at home.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > Dave
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > "kpg" <> wrote in message
    >> >> >> > news:%...
    >> >> >> >> Hello all,
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >> I have an asp.net web application with tons of Java script
    >> >> >> >> files.
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >> I would like to protect the Java Script somehow so it can't be
    >> >> >> >> seen by a remote user.
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >> I found several 3rd party solutions, but I thought I remember

    > that
    >> >> >> >> there was a way to 'compile' java script and use that instead of
    >> >> >> >> the actual script?
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >> The problem I have with 3rd party solutions is two-fold:
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >> 1) I'm cheap
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >> 2) I'm going to install the app on a customer's server for use
    >> >> >> >> by
    >> >> >> >> their customers. I don't want them (my customer) or their
    >> >> >> >> customers
    >> >> >> >> to have access to the java script files.
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >> I think a 3rd party solution would work fine for me on my
    >> >> >> >> server,
    >> > but
    >> >> >> >> I
    >> >> >> >> can't really give the customer the app and the 3rd party

    > protection
    >> >> >> >> thingy
    >> >> >> >> and say: install this so you can't see my code (because they

    > might
    >> >> > not!).
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >> Anyway, I'm open to any solution.
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >> Thanks
    >> >> >> >> kpg
    >> >> >> >>
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    Kevin Spencer, Apr 28, 2005
    #18
  19. kpg

    David Young Guest

    "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Second, your solution doesn't "work." It can be circumvented just like all
    > the others.


    Ok, aside from packet sniffing and decompiling the source, how can it be
    circumvented. Not being a smartass here, just the ignorant student asking a
    question of the master.

    > We're Indians. You're Columbus. Welcome to the New
    > World.


    Whatever.

    > --
    > HTH,
    >
    > Kevin Spencer
    > Microsoft MVP
    > .Net Developer
    > What You Seek Is What You Get.
    David Young, Apr 28, 2005
    #19
  20. Hi David,

    I'm no master. I'm not sure what a "master" is. I am faced every day with
    problems that I must learn something new in order to solve. Lately, for
    example, I've been struggling with modelling a small aircraft in a 3D
    terrain scene based on GPS data that comes in at about 1 data point per
    second. To do the interpolation/extrapolation requires some trigonometry
    (not a problem) and some calculus (a problem). So, I've been getting help
    with the calculus, and kicking myself for not knowing it, and costing my
    employer money as a result. I've bought a couple of books on calculus, and
    hopefully will get better at it as I go. I plan to study it at home in my
    free time.

    I couldn't begin to write an operating system. There are programmers out
    there who seem like gods to me. Most of them work for Microsoft or some
    Gaming software company.

    I only know one thing that you do not, that I know of. And I'm sure you know
    a thing or 2 that I do not. That's what we're here for, to help each other
    out along the way.

    I may come across as a "master" because I tend to keep my mouth shut about
    the things I do not know, and speak with authority about the things I DO
    know. Occasionally I will make a guess, but not often, and then I will
    qualify my remarks by saying that I am guessing. But the perception would be
    merely on the part of the perceiver.

    So relax, we're all in the same leaky boat together. It's not about people
    and personalities, it's about knowledge. I'll share mine with you, and
    hopefully, when I'm stuck, you'll share yours with me.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    What You Seek Is What You Get.

    "David Young" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Kevin Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> Second, your solution doesn't "work." It can be circumvented just like
    >> all
    >> the others.

    >
    > Ok, aside from packet sniffing and decompiling the source, how can it be
    > circumvented. Not being a smartass here, just the ignorant student asking
    > a
    > question of the master.
    >
    >> We're Indians. You're Columbus. Welcome to the New
    >> World.

    >
    > Whatever.
    >
    >> --
    >> HTH,
    >>
    >> Kevin Spencer
    >> Microsoft MVP
    >> .Net Developer
    >> What You Seek Is What You Get.

    >
    >
    Kevin Spencer, Apr 28, 2005
    #20
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