Host

Discussion in 'Java' started by danny, Jan 1, 2007.

  1. danny

    danny Guest

    Anyone Know of a good free webhosting site that supports java?
     
    danny, Jan 1, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. danny

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    danny wrote:
    > Anyone Know of a good free webhosting site that supports java?


    Do you mean Java servlets, or do you mean Applets on the page?

    Applets on the page doesn't require any special hosting.

    You're highly unlikely to get free hosting for a Java servlet, whatever
    the quality.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Jan 1, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. danny

    ck Guest

    Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > danny wrote:
    > > Anyone Know of a good free webhosting site that supports java?

    >
    > Do you mean Java servlets, or do you mean Applets on the page?
    >
    > Applets on the page doesn't require any special hosting.
    >
    > You're highly unlikely to get free hosting for a Java servlet, whatever
    > the quality.


    You could try www.eatj.com. It does provide free hosting(there is a
    annoying catch though)

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers,
    Ck
    http://www.gfour.net
     
    ck, Jan 1, 2007
    #3
  4. ck wrote:
    > Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > > danny wrote:
    > > > Anyone Know of a good free webhosting site that supports java?

    > >
    > > Do you mean Java servlets, or do you mean Applets on the page?
    > >
    > > Applets on the page doesn't require any special hosting.
    > >
    > > You're highly unlikely to get free hosting for a Java servlet, whatever
    > > the quality.

    >
    > You could try www.eatj.com. It does provide free hosting(there is a
    > annoying catch though)


    What catch? I would expect 'in page' ads.

    I had a look over their 'free offer' specs., and
    the limits seem modest, but fine for a small,
    relatively sedate (not high volume) site.
    The 'terms and conditions' do not seem
    beyond reason..

    Andrew T.
     
    Andrew Thompson, Jan 1, 2007
    #4
  5. danny

    ck Guest

    On Jan 1, 10:08 pm, "Andrew Thompson" <> wrote:
    > ck wrote:
    > > Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > > > danny wrote:
    > > > > Anyone Know of a good free webhosting site that supports java?

    >
    > > > Do you mean Java servlets, or do you mean Applets on the page?

    >
    > > > Applets on the page doesn't require any special hosting.

    >
    > > > You're highly unlikely to get free hosting for a Java servlet, whatever
    > > > the quality.

    >
    > > You could trywww.eatj.com. It does provide free hosting(there is a
    > > annoying catch though)What catch? I would expect 'in page' ads.

    >
    > I had a look over their 'free offer' specs., and
    > the limits seem modest, but fine for a small,
    > relatively sedate (not high volume) site.
    > The 'terms and conditions' do not seem
    > beyond reason..
    >
    > Andrew T.


    The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    hours for free accounts on eatj.

    Cheers,
    Ck
    http://www.gfour.net
     
    ck, Jan 1, 2007
    #5
  6. ck wrote:
    ...
    > > > You could trywww.eatj.com. It does provide free hosting(there is a
    > > > annoying catch though)

    ....
    > The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    > hours for free accounts on eatj.


    Huh! Bummer..

    I see your point, now.

    Andrew T.
     
    Andrew Thompson, Jan 2, 2007
    #6
  7. danny

    danny Guest

    Thanks dude(s)
    Andrew Thompson wrote:
    > ck wrote:
    > ..
    > > > > You could trywww.eatj.com. It does provide free hosting(there is a
    > > > > annoying catch though)

    > ...
    > > The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    > > hours for free accounts on eatj.

    >
    > Huh! Bummer..
    >
    > I see your point, now.
    >
    > Andrew T.
     
    danny, Jan 3, 2007
    #7
  8. ck wrote:
    > The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    > hours for free accounts on eatj.


    Seems pointless. Especially as anyone with even a tiny bit of real
    wizardry can quickly knock up a scraper and a cron job to run on their
    own PC to automate it.
     
    John Ersatznom, Jan 4, 2007
    #8
  9. danny

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    John Ersatznom wrote:
    > ck wrote:
    > > The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    > > hours for free accounts on eatj.

    >
    > Seems pointless. Especially as anyone with even a tiny bit of real
    > wizardry can quickly knock up a scraper and a cron job to run on their
    > own PC to automate it.


    I was thinking the same thing.
    It would still be a PITA though.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Jan 4, 2007
    #9
  10. danny

    ck Guest

    Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > John Ersatznom wrote:
    > > ck wrote:
    > > > The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    > > > hours for free accounts on eatj.

    > >
    > > Seems pointless. Especially as anyone with even a tiny bit of real
    > > wizardry can quickly knock up a scraper and a cron job to run on their
    > > own PC to automate it.

    >
    > I was thinking the same thing.
    > It would still be a PITA though.


    I don't know anything about cron daemon and how it works, but can a
    cron daemon fix this issue of logging in to the server and restarting
    the app(I believe the server checks from which url request is getting
    generated. That should be quite an easy way to make sure that the
    request are not automated. I might be wrong, but thats what I think
    happens.)?
    If I am wrong could you give an idea how to do that? I tried doing this
    using javascript which refreshes after every 20 minutes but that failed
    too.
    By the way I did try using commons httpclient to do the same thing. But
    that was no good either.

    Cheers,
    Ck
    http://www.gfour.net
     
    ck, Jan 4, 2007
    #10
  11. danny

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    ck wrote:
    > Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > > John Ersatznom wrote:
    > > > ck wrote:
    > > > > The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    > > > > hours for free accounts on eatj.
    > > >
    > > > Seems pointless. Especially as anyone with even a tiny bit of real
    > > > wizardry can quickly knock up a scraper and a cron job to run on their
    > > > own PC to automate it.

    > >
    > > I was thinking the same thing.
    > > It would still be a PITA though.

    >
    > I don't know anything about cron daemon and how it works, but can a
    > cron daemon fix this issue of logging in to the server and restarting
    > the app(I believe the server checks from which url request is getting
    > generated. That should be quite an easy way to make sure that the
    > request are not automated. I might be wrong, but thats what I think
    > happens.)?
    > If I am wrong could you give an idea how to do that? I tried doing this
    > using javascript which refreshes after every 20 minutes but that failed
    > too.
    > By the way I did try using commons httpclient to do the same thing. But
    > that was no good either.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Ck
    > http://www.gfour.net


    cron just allows you to schedule a program/script run.

    As for urls and referers, those are all set by the client. You can set
    the referer URL to however you want. Referer is nothing more than a
    header set by the User-Agent. I've had to write a program that
    pretended to be Mozilla, logged into a web site (saving cookies), and
    did some things, and then logged off. It had to be indistinguishible
    from a regular user.

    It wasn't too hard to do :)
     
    Daniel Pitts, Jan 4, 2007
    #11
  12. danny

    ck Guest

    Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > cron just allows you to schedule a program/script run.


    Yea I get that. Just read about it. I am not a linux user myself
    though.

    > As for urls and referers, those are all set by the client. You can set
    > the referer URL to however you want. Referer is nothing more than a
    > header set by the User-Agent. I've had to write a program that
    > pretended to be Mozilla, logged into a web site (saving cookies), and
    > did some things, and then logged off. It had to be indistinguishible
    > from a regular user.


    Yea I did not think of that(inexperience) we can set the Referer. One
    way to automate this could also be achieved by hosting a web app and
    let the web app log in to the account and log off. Would that be a bad
    idea?

    > It wasn't too hard to do :)


    Well thats a perspective.

    Cheers,
    Ck
     
    ck, Jan 4, 2007
    #12
  13. ck wrote:
    > Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >
    >>John Ersatznom wrote:
    >>
    >>>ck wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    >>>>hours for free accounts on eatj.
    >>>
    >>>Seems pointless. Especially as anyone with even a tiny bit of real
    >>>wizardry can quickly knock up a scraper and a cron job to run on their
    >>>own PC to automate it.

    >>
    >>I was thinking the same thing.
    >>It would still be a PITA though.

    >
    > I don't know anything about cron daemon and how it works, but can a
    > cron daemon fix this issue of logging in to the server and restarting
    > the app(I believe the server checks from which url request is getting
    > generated. That should be quite an easy way to make sure that the
    > request are not automated. I might be wrong, but thats what I think
    > happens.)?


    It shouldn't be hard. There are even tools to script IE so you can
    puppet it into simulating the user interaction. There is NO way the
    remote site can detect that even in principle, especially with random
    delays of a few fractions of a second built into the "playback" of the
    "macro". In any event, you clearly need to set the Referer(sic) header
    to the correct origin page, and maybe even request that page first, and
    a few other things. But if a Web browser (driven by certain user input)
    can do it, then so can Java code. The user + computer combo at the other
    end of the network connection is to them a black box and the only way
    they can be sure no human's involved is if they can't get past a captcha
    or they generate inhumanly large amounts of traffic -- asking for a page
    every millisecond or 300 in a day or something no normal human being
    would do.

    Sites shouldn't even try, other than to use captchas to frustrate
    spambots trying to actually spam via guestbooks, forums, and blog
    comments and to block IPs for the rest of the day that exceed traffic
    limits no human would exceed. They can block known-bad IPs and
    user-agents too but those are easy for a genuine malefactor to change
    and IPs can be hard for an individual of limited resources caught by a
    false positive to ditch, so I don't recomment that. Just temporarily
    black out excessive traffic sources to effectively throttle per-visitor
    bandwidth costs and if actual plagiarised material from your site shows
    up elsewhere complain to the hosting provider to get it taken down.
    Things like the DMCA are for that, not for restricting users' choice of
    tools and automation.
     
    John Ersatznom, Jan 5, 2007
    #13
  14. ck wrote:
    > Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >
    >>cron just allows you to schedule a program/script run.

    >
    > Yea I get that. Just read about it. I am not a linux user myself
    > though.


    Very handy. One time, years ago, I set a cron job up one time to
    retrieve a "picture of the day" from a web site (no, not Wikipedia) and
    save it to a fixed location every night at 1 am ... a fixed location on
    my Windows desktop, that is. Yep, it can be ported over and even run as
    an NT service. Getting it not to try to send me email (and choke when it
    failed, since unix mail spooling wasn't set up) was the hard part. The
    job called a script that was a thin wrapper around wget. Of course I had
    to move, rename, or otherwise deal with the file so the next day's
    wouldn't obliterate it. These days, in the name of not being blocked for
    the heinous crime of saving a few keystrokes a day I'd put it on a
    random delay (inside the script) up to a few hours and fake a Mozilla
    user agent string of some kind, though.
     
    John Ersatznom, Jan 6, 2007
    #14
  15. danny

    Alex Hunsley Guest

    ck wrote:
    > On Jan 1, 10:08 pm, "Andrew Thompson" <> wrote:
    >> ck wrote:
    >>> Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >>>> danny wrote:
    >>>>> Anyone Know of a good free webhosting site that supports java?
    >>>> Do you mean Java servlets, or do you mean Applets on the page?
    >>>> Applets on the page doesn't require any special hosting.
    >>>> You're highly unlikely to get free hosting for a Java servlet, whatever
    >>>> the quality.
    >>> You could trywww.eatj.com. It does provide free hosting(there is a
    >>> annoying catch though)What catch? I would expect 'in page' ads.

    >> I had a look over their 'free offer' specs., and
    >> the limits seem modest, but fine for a small,
    >> relatively sedate (not high volume) site.
    >> The 'terms and conditions' do not seem
    >> beyond reason..
    >>
    >> Andrew T.

    >
    > The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    > hours for free accounts on eatj.


    Couldn't we set up a servlet somewhere else to access their web
    interface and automatically restart the servlets?

    :))
     
    Alex Hunsley, Jan 10, 2007
    #15
  16. danny

    ck Guest

    Alex Hunsley wrote:
    > > The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    > > hours for free accounts on eatj.

    >
    > Couldn't we set up a servlet somewhere else to access their web
    > interface and automatically restart the servlets?
    >
    > :))


    Well that's exactly what I was talking about. I tried it using commons
    http client. Though it results in 401 error. (mostly, redirect by the
    server). I have tried to set follow redirect but that results in
    exception.
    If anyone is interested I can put the code that fails.

    Cheers,
    Ck
    http://www.gfour.net
     
    ck, Jan 10, 2007
    #16
  17. danny

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    ck wrote:
    > Alex Hunsley wrote:
    > > > The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    > > > hours for free accounts on eatj.

    > >
    > > Couldn't we set up a servlet somewhere else to access their web
    > > interface and automatically restart the servlets?
    > >
    > > :))

    >
    > Well that's exactly what I was talking about. I tried it using commons
    > http client. Though it results in 401 error. (mostly, redirect by the
    > server). I have tried to set follow redirect but that results in
    > exception.
    > If anyone is interested I can put the code that fails.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Ck
    > http://www.gfour.net

    401 is "Unauthorized", meaning you probably need to do some
    authentication. This is likely to be a cookie you haven't retrieved or
    haven't sent. Make sure your program will actually log in properly
    before attempting anything else.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Jan 10, 2007
    #17
  18. danny

    Alex Hunsley Guest

    ck wrote:
    > Alex Hunsley wrote:
    >>> The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    >>> hours for free accounts on eatj.

    >> Couldn't we set up a servlet somewhere else to access their web
    >> interface and automatically restart the servlets?
    >>
    >> :))

    >
    > Well that's exactly what I was talking about. I tried it using commons
    > http client. Though it results in 401 error. (mostly, redirect by the
    > server). I have tried to set follow redirect but that results in
    > exception.
    > If anyone is interested I can put the code that fails.


    As Daniel pointed out, you may be missing a cookie. The other classic
    things they might be looking for are:

    1) referrer string - if it's not apparently the correct URL from their
    site going to their form submission URL (as referrer), they might block
    2) user agent - if it doesn't look like some sort of standard browser,
    they might also block

    To get under the bonnet and see what HTTP traffic is doing, I recommend
    something like the Proxomitron web proxy: you set your browser to use
    this proxy, and then check out the Proxomitron log window (turn on
    things like 'view posted data' too) - very handy for seeing what cookies
    are set, the exact headers flying about, where a redirect happened,
    etc., when you visit a site and do things.

    Proxomitron is free (as in beer) and funky:
    http://www.proxomitron.info/

    Also there's a decent Java HTTP proxy called Charles, but it's not free
    - you have to buy it after N days trial.

    lex
     
    Alex Hunsley, Jan 11, 2007
    #18
  19. danny

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    Alex Hunsley wrote:
    > ck wrote:
    > > Alex Hunsley wrote:
    > >>> The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    > >>> hours for free accounts on eatj.
    > >> Couldn't we set up a servlet somewhere else to access their web
    > >> interface and automatically restart the servlets?
    > >>
    > >> :))

    > >
    > > Well that's exactly what I was talking about. I tried it using commons
    > > http client. Though it results in 401 error. (mostly, redirect by the
    > > server). I have tried to set follow redirect but that results in
    > > exception.
    > > If anyone is interested I can put the code that fails.

    >
    > As Daniel pointed out, you may be missing a cookie. The other classic
    > things they might be looking for are:
    >
    > 1) referrer string - if it's not apparently the correct URL from their
    > site going to their form submission URL (as referrer), they might block
    > 2) user agent - if it doesn't look like some sort of standard browser,
    > they might also block
    >
    > To get under the bonnet and see what HTTP traffic is doing, I recommend
    > something like the Proxomitron web proxy: you set your browser to use
    > this proxy, and then check out the Proxomitron log window (turn on
    > things like 'view posted data' too) - very handy for seeing what cookies
    > are set, the exact headers flying about, where a redirect happened,
    > etc., when you visit a site and do things.
    >
    > Proxomitron is free (as in beer) and funky:
    > http://www.proxomitron.info/
    >
    > Also there's a decent Java HTTP proxy called Charles, but it's not free
    > - you have to buy it after N days trial.
    >
    > lex

    I suggest using Ethereal to monitor traffic. No need to set up a
    proxy, and you can monitor other types of communication, not just HTTP.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Jan 11, 2007
    #19
  20. danny

    Alex Hunsley Guest

    Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > Alex Hunsley wrote:
    >> ck wrote:
    >>> Alex Hunsley wrote:
    >>>>> The catch I was talking about is the need to start the server every 6
    >>>>> hours for free accounts on eatj.
    >>>> Couldn't we set up a servlet somewhere else to access their web
    >>>> interface and automatically restart the servlets?
    >>>>
    >>>> :))
    >>> Well that's exactly what I was talking about. I tried it using commons
    >>> http client. Though it results in 401 error. (mostly, redirect by the
    >>> server). I have tried to set follow redirect but that results in
    >>> exception.
    >>> If anyone is interested I can put the code that fails.

    >> As Daniel pointed out, you may be missing a cookie. The other classic
    >> things they might be looking for are:
    >>
    >> 1) referrer string - if it's not apparently the correct URL from their
    >> site going to their form submission URL (as referrer), they might block
    >> 2) user agent - if it doesn't look like some sort of standard browser,
    >> they might also block
    >>
    >> To get under the bonnet and see what HTTP traffic is doing, I recommend
    >> something like the Proxomitron web proxy: you set your browser to use
    >> this proxy, and then check out the Proxomitron log window (turn on
    >> things like 'view posted data' too) - very handy for seeing what cookies
    >> are set, the exact headers flying about, where a redirect happened,
    >> etc., when you visit a site and do things.
    >>
    >> Proxomitron is free (as in beer) and funky:
    >> http://www.proxomitron.info/
    >>
    >> Also there's a decent Java HTTP proxy called Charles, but it's not free
    >> - you have to buy it after N days trial.
    >>
    >> lex

    > I suggest using Ethereal to monitor traffic. No need to set up a
    > proxy, and you can monitor other types of communication, not just HTTP.


    I only just recently found out about Ethereal forking off into a product
    called Wireshark. The ethereal site doesn't mention Wireshark for weird
    legal reasons. I believe wireshark is the more up-to-date/recent project...

    Yup, Ethereal/wireshark is good stuff for monitoring HTTP traffic and
    more, although it may be a little harder to use (although not bad once
    you know how). I prefer Proxomitron for lightweight HTTP monitoring.
     
    Alex Hunsley, Jan 11, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Vijesh
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    449
    Vijesh
    Nov 27, 2004
  2. KPK

    USB host in FPGA

    KPK, Sep 29, 2004, in forum: VHDL
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    3,503
  3. Jenkins
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    4,209
    Stan Mooney
    Aug 31, 2003
  4. Orpheus66
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    4,504
    Orpheus66
    Jul 30, 2003
  5. Jerry Qu
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    523
    lee atkinson
    Feb 20, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page