How do I use HTML?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by kttelibake, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. kttelibake

    kttelibake Guest

    I know I sound dumb...

    I am a unserious site designer for a TINY organization run by kids...
    Everyone loves my site! But I am really bad at HTML... and I think I
    should be better at it. I have had to use it a few times, but with
    many struggles. I joined this group so I could learn a little more
    about how to use it. Any advice?

    Thanks!

    Ellie
    P.S.
    Sometimes I go by Kati, Ellie is a nickname for my middle name.
     
    kttelibake, Feb 4, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. kttelibake

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 4 Feb, 01:24, kttelibake <> wrote:

    > I am a unserious site designer for a TINY organization run by kids...
    > Everyone loves my site! But I am really bad at HTML...


    There are lots of tutorials around, but most are really poor quality
    and will mislead you. W3Schools is one of these.

    I'd recommend a couple of books:
    * Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML (start here for page coding)
    * Head First Web Design (Broader issues about "design")
    * Cascading Style Sheets, Lie & Bos (CSS intro & reference)

    One web site:
    * http://htmldog.com
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 4, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. kttelibake

    kttelibake Guest

    On Feb 3, 11:13 pm, Neredbojias <> wrote:
    > On 03 Feb 2009, kttelibake <> wrote:
    >
    > > I know I sound dumb...

    >
    > Wait till you hear what I've got to say...
    >
    > > I am a unserious site designer for a TINY organization run by kids...
    > > Everyone loves my site! But I am really bad at HTML... and I think I
    > > should be better at it. I have had to use it a few times, but with
    > > many struggles. I joined this group so I could learn a little more
    > > about how to use it. Any advice?

    >
    > > Thanks!

    >
    > > Ellie
    > > P.S.
    > > Sometimes I go by Kati, Ellie is a nickname for my middle name.

    >
    > Is your middle name "Elephant"?
    >
    > Anyway, the best way to learn html is by making pages, checking them
    > against the validator, correcting mistakes, then trying new things to
    > improve the overall product.  In the course of this, read and reference
    > the specs frequently to learn all the options and proper methods of
    > html.  In other words, "Practice makes perfect".
    >
    > --
    > Neredbojias
    > Driving can be tiring - especially after supper,
    > So 'fore you take an evening trip - you ought to pop an upper.
    > Burma Shave


    My middle name is not Elephant.

    OK!
     
    kttelibake, Feb 4, 2009
    #3
  4. kttelibake

    kttelibake Guest

    On Feb 4, 5:54 am, Andy Dingley <> wrote:
    > On 4 Feb, 01:24, kttelibake <> wrote:
    >
    > > I am a unserious site designer for a TINY organization run by kids...
    > > Everyone loves my site! But I am really bad at HTML...

    >
    > There are lots of tutorials around, but most are really poor quality
    > and will mislead you. W3Schools is one of these.
    >
    > I'd recommend a couple of books:
    > * Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML   (start here for page coding)
    > * Head First Web Design              (Broader issues about "design")
    > * Cascading Style Sheets, Lie & Bos  (CSS intro & reference)
    >
    > One web site:
    > *http://htmldog.com


    Alright! So I guess we can end this here if no one has anything else
    to say!
     
    kttelibake, Feb 4, 2009
    #4
  5. kttelibake

    rf Guest

    kttelibake wrote:
    > On Feb 4, 5:54 am, Andy Dingley <> wrote:
    >> On 4 Feb, 01:24, kttelibake <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I am a unserious site designer for a TINY organization run by
    >>> kids... Everyone loves my site! But I am really bad at HTML...

    >>
    >> There are lots of tutorials around, but most are really poor quality
    >> and will mislead you. W3Schools is one of these.
    >>
    >> I'd recommend a couple of books:
    >> * Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML (start here for page coding)
    >> * Head First Web Design (Broader issues about "design")
    >> * Cascading Style Sheets, Lie & Bos (CSS intro & reference)
    >>
    >> One web site:
    >> *http://htmldog.com

    >
    > Alright! So I guess we can end this here if no one has anything else
    > to say!


    Nice attitude, not!
     
    rf, Feb 4, 2009
    #5
  6. kttelibake wrote:
    > On Feb 4, 5:54 am, Andy Dingley <> wrote:
    >> On 4 Feb, 01:24, kttelibake <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I am a unserious site designer for a TINY organization run by kids...
    >>> Everyone loves my site! But I am really bad at HTML...

    >> There are lots of tutorials around, but most are really poor quality
    >> and will mislead you. W3Schools is one of these.
    >>
    >> I'd recommend a couple of books:
    >> * Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML (start here for page coding)
    >> * Head First Web Design (Broader issues about "design")
    >> * Cascading Style Sheets, Lie & Bos (CSS intro & reference)
    >>
    >> One web site:
    >> *http://htmldog.com

    >
    > Alright! So I guess we can end this here if no one has anything else
    > to say!


    What more do you wish people to say? They have pointed you where to
    start, next step is on you. Read some and learn.

    Most of HTML is very easy and you will commonly use less than a dozen
    elements and a handful of rules that govern those elements. Styling and
    scripting gets more complicated and more advanced.

    I agree the tutorials at http://htmldog.com are both easy to follow and
    most accurate to be found on the web. If you are not compelled to read a
    little and practice than maybe web design is not for you.

    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
     
    Jonathan N. Little, Feb 4, 2009
    #6
  7. kttelibake

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    richard <> wrote:

    > HTML is nothing more than a set of instructions telling the recipient
    > (browser) what to do with those instructions.


    Not quite but never mind...

    Woody Allen:

    I took a speed reading course and read 'War and Peace' in twenty
    minutes. It involves Russia.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Feb 4, 2009
    #7
  8. Gazing into my crystal ball I observed dorayme
    <> writing in news:doraymeRidThis-
    :

    > In article <Xns9BA7B996DBF07arbpenyahoocom@207.115.17.102>,
    > Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:
    >
    >> Gazing into my crystal ball I observed kttelibake
    >> <> writing in news:95ea15f6-f24a-468d-afc5-
    >> :
    >>
    >> > I know I sound dumb...

    >>
    >> Actually, you can't sound dumb - dumb means unable to talk, so how

    can
    >> you _sound_ dumb ... there is no need to start a conversation with an
    >> appology.

    >
    > Adrienne, "dumb" was not meant by OP literally. She is not that dumb!

    It
    > was meant as a humble entry and to get folks to hold their fire for

    long
    > enough for her to grab some tips and get out. This technique can work
    > sometimes. Other ways into a new group include to go in hard and
    > arrogant, pick out the biggest and ugliest alpha male and then tear

    his
    > throat out. All these techniques are laid out in my new pamphlet, "How
    > to say hello on Usenet" which is on sale for $1.50. There is a special
    > offer for one week only for alt.html subscribers, 35% discount.
    >


    Oh, I know that "dumb" was not meant literally, dumb has come to mean
    stupid. The problem with saying things like this about yourself often
    enough is pretty soon you believe it.

    I was hoping that the OP would GET that if one could not SOUND dumb, one
    could not BE dumb. Guess not.

    --
    Adrienne Boswell at Home
    Arbpen Web Site Design Services
    http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    Please respond to the group so others can share
     
    Adrienne Boswell, Feb 5, 2009
    #8
  9. kttelibake

    kttelibake Guest

    On Feb 4, 8:10 am, "rf" <> wrote:
    > kttelibake wrote:
    > > On Feb 4, 5:54 am, Andy Dingley <> wrote:
    > >> On 4 Feb, 01:24, kttelibake <> wrote:

    >
    > >>> I am a unserious site designer for a TINY organization run by
    > >>> kids... Everyone loves my site! But I am really bad at HTML...

    >
    > >> There are lots of tutorials around, but most are really poor quality
    > >> and will mislead you. W3Schools is one of these.

    >
    > >> I'd recommend a couple of books:
    > >> * Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML (start here for page coding)
    > >> * Head First Web Design (Broader issues about "design")
    > >> * Cascading Style Sheets, Lie & Bos (CSS intro & reference)

    >
    > >> One web site:
    > >> *http://htmldog.com

    >
    > > Alright! So I guess we can end this here if no one has anything else
    > > to say!

    >
    > Nice attitude, not!


    Oh, sorry, I didn't mean for that to be mean or anything...
    I am serious.
     
    kttelibake, Feb 5, 2009
    #9
  10. kttelibake

    kttelibake Guest

    On Feb 4, 9:31 pm, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:
    > Gazing into my crystal ball I observed dorayme
    > <> writing in news:doraymeRidThis-
    > :
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > In article <Xns9BA7B996DBF07arbpenyahoo...@207.115.17.102>,
    > >  Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:

    >
    > >> Gazing into my crystal ball I observed kttelibake
    > >> <> writing in news:95ea15f6-f24a-468d-afc5-
    > >> :

    >
    > >> > I know I sound dumb...

    >
    > >> Actually, you can't sound dumb - dumb means unable to talk, so how

    > can
    > >> you _sound_ dumb ... there is no need to start a conversation with an
    > >> appology.

    >
    > > Adrienne, "dumb" was not meant by OP literally. She is not that dumb!

    > It
    > > was meant as a humble entry and to get folks to hold their fire for

    > long
    > > enough for her to grab some tips and get out. This technique can work
    > > sometimes. Other ways into a new group include to go in hard and
    > > arrogant, pick out the biggest and ugliest alpha male and then tear

    > his
    > > throat out. All these techniques are laid out in my new pamphlet, "How  
    > > to say hello on Usenet" which is on sale for $1.50. There is a special
    > > offer for one week only for alt.html subscribers, 35% discount.

    >
    > Oh, I know that "dumb" was not meant literally, dumb has come to mean
    > stupid.  The problem with saying things like this about yourself often
    > enough is pretty soon you believe it.
    >
    > I was hoping that the OP would GET that if one could not SOUND dumb, one
    > could not BE dumb.  Guess not.
    >
    > --
    > Adrienne Boswell at Home
    > Arbpen Web Site Design Serviceshttp://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    > Please respond to the group so others can share


    Does all this dumb stuff really matter?
     
    kttelibake, Feb 5, 2009
    #10
  11. Gazing into my crystal ball I observed kttelibake
    <> writing in news:e7fce14d-3813-47e7-ae17-
    :

    > Does all this dumb stuff really matter?
    >
    >


    Not at all.

    "What others say of me matters little; what I myself say and do matters
    much." - Elbert Hubbard quotes

    --
    Adrienne Boswell at Home
    Arbpen Web Site Design Services
    http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    Please respond to the group so others can share
     
    Adrienne Boswell, Feb 5, 2009
    #11
  12. kttelibake

    dorayme Guest

    In article
    <>,
    kttelibake <> wrote:

    > Does all this dumb stuff really matter?


    Well, you brought it up in the beginning... <g>

    Perhaps you might put up your site or some equally similar page here and
    see what tips folk might give you to get you rolling in some direction,
    increasing your appetite to read and study what Andy Dingley has
    recommended.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Feb 5, 2009
    #12
  13. kttelibake

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 5 Feb, 04:17, kttelibake <> wrote:

    > Oh, sorry, I didn't mean for that to be mean or anything...


    Don't worry, I have a remarkably thick skin :cool:
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 6, 2009
    #13
  14. kttelibake

    Neredbojias Guest

    On 05 Feb 2009, Andy Dingley <> wrote:

    > On 5 Feb, 04:17, kttelibake <> wrote:
    >
    >> Oh, sorry, I didn't mean for that to be mean or anything...

    >
    > Don't worry, I have a remarkably thick skin :cool:


    Oh, so you're the elephant...

    --
    Neredbojias
    Driving can be tiring : Especially after supper
    So ere you take an evening trip : You ought to pop an upper.
    Burma Shave
    http://www.neredbojias.org/
     
    Neredbojias, Feb 6, 2009
    #14
  15. kttelibake

    Joy Beeson Guest

    On Tue, 3 Feb 2009 17:24:22 -0800 (PST), kttelibake
    <> wrote:

    > designer for a TINY organization run by kids


    Everything you *really* need to know for such a small job can be
    printed on one sheet of letter paper in twelve-point type. Whenever
    things get complicated and confusing, you are doing it wrong.

    Unless the kids are into graphic design and you need to twist
    hypertext into a graphic-design tool -- but I'd just make each design
    a single image, with no HTML except for links, so that you don't have
    to allow for readers vetoing your choice of fonts, changing the
    background color, and so on. (But *man*, you'd need to spend *hours*
    writing alternate text for blind readers!)

    Or things can get complicated and confusing when you are stretching
    yourself to learn a new trick -- but don't do that in public.

    --
    Joy Beeson
    joy beeson at comcast dot net
     
    Joy Beeson, Feb 6, 2009
    #15
  16. kttelibake

    Joy Beeson Guest

    On Fri, 06 Feb 2009 00:30:42 -0500, Joy Beeson
    <> wrote:

    > but don't do that in public.


    Sites overstuffed with tricks the would-be designer has just learned
    and will never master are far from new.

    Back when self-publishing was done on paper, the editor who had just
    switched from ditto or mimeo to photocopy or offset exclaimed "I don't
    have to trace line art with a stylus any more! And I have hundreds of
    mis-matched borders and a whole book of irrelevant clip art! I'll
    never print white space again!"

    Later on, the editor who switched from creating copy with a typewriter
    or daisy wheel to a laser printer or inkjet got drunk on font choice:
    No two headers the same size, no two paragraphs in the same typeface,
    important stuff in letters too big to see as words.

    I wonder what excesses happened when the hectograph was invented? I
    don't quite go back far enough to know. I don't even know whether it
    was before or after the typewriter. It *might* be before carbon
    paper.

    A newsletter that I used to print with twelve sheets of extra-thin
    carbon paper now goes out to an unlimited number of people by e-mail.
    We have just finished one incredible century.

    Joy Beeson
    --
    joy beeson at comcast dot net
    http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- sewing
    http://n3f.home.comcast.net/ -- Writers' Exchange
    The above message is a Usenet post.
    I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
     
    Joy Beeson, Feb 19, 2009
    #16
  17. kttelibake

    asdf Guest

    "Joy Beeson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 06 Feb 2009 00:30:42 -0500, Joy Beeson
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> but don't do that in public.

    >
    > Sites overstuffed with tricks the would-be designer has just learned
    > and will never master are far from new.
    >
    > Back when self-publishing was done on paper, the editor who had just
    > switched from ditto or mimeo to photocopy or offset exclaimed "I don't
    > have to trace line art with a stylus any more! And I have hundreds of
    > mis-matched borders and a whole book of irrelevant clip art! I'll
    > never print white space again!"
    >
    > Later on, the editor who switched from creating copy with a typewriter
    > or daisy wheel to a laser printer or inkjet got drunk on font choice:
    > No two headers the same size, no two paragraphs in the same typeface,
    > important stuff in letters too big to see as words.
    >
    > I wonder what excesses happened when the hectograph was invented? I
    > don't quite go back far enough to know. I don't even know whether it
    > was before or after the typewriter. It *might* be before carbon
    > paper.
    >
    > A newsletter that I used to print with twelve sheets of extra-thin
    > carbon paper now goes out to an unlimited number of people by e-mail.
    > We have just finished one incredible century.
    >
    > Joy Beeson
    > --
    > joy beeson at comcast dot net
    > http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- sewing
    > http://n3f.home.comcast.net/ -- Writers' Exchange
    > The above message is a Usenet post.
    > I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
    >
    >


    Ummm... HTML (and other content) delivered through web browsers does NOT
    equate to print, no matter how you cut and paste it. :D

    Having said that, the web, together with other self-publishing tools like
    HTML, SGML, Word etc... have done much to de-mystify the world of the
    typesetter and publisher. It's no longer a closed shop, thankfully. The
    typesetter/publisher no longer controls content, and nor should (s)he. (Bear
    in mind here, that look and feel IS content, however misguided that notion
    may be - there IS a message in presentation).

    ....and finally (if done correctly on the web) typesetting (i.e.
    presentation) is now wholely seperated from meaning (the actual text). This
    is a "Good Thing". Textual content should stand on it's own, unadorned,
    feet, I say, without decoration or embellishment, other than that in the
    written word.

    (spot the lack of editorial punctuation in the previous paragraph)

    I sincerely hope you are not bemoaning the old typeset days. The web in
    particular, and the internet in general, have empowered the millions
    (perhaps billions) that were enslaved - or at least entrapped - by the
    printing press IMHO, just as those pre-Gutenburg thinkers were entrapped by
    a lack of media and popular consumption.

    Just be aware that in 'empowerment of the masses', comes 'masses of
    bulls**t'. There's nothing new in that. Compare Darwin's 'Origin of Species'
    with 'Playboy'. The 'net alone is not responsible for the prolifieration of
    crap. The crap comes from peoples' minds, not from the media on which it is
    presented.

    The trick now is to seperate the bulls**t from the useful online. Good luck
    with that one.

    Welcome to the (late) 20th century / (early) 21st century. Shite content has
    become the norm. Filter it, then get used to it, just as we have had to with
    print-based media.

    (Random thoughts)
     
    asdf, Feb 19, 2009
    #17
  18. kttelibake

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 19 Feb, 05:54, "asdf" <> wrote:
    > "Joy Beeson" <> wrote in message


    > > Back when self-publishing was done on paper, the editor who had just
    > > switched from ditto or mimeo to photocopy or offset exclaimed "I don't
    > > have to trace line art with a stylus any more!  And I have hundreds of
    > > mis-matched borders and a whole book of irrelevant clip art!   I'll
    > > never print white space again!"


    > Ummm... HTML (and other content) delivered through web browsers does NOT
    > equate to print, no matter how you cut and paste it. :D


    Of course it does, if you look at the "usage" question rather than the
    "media". Facebook and Wordpress are the punk 'zines of 30 years ago.


    > Having said that, the web, together with other self-publishing tools like
    > HTML, SGML, Word etc... have done much to de-mystify the world of the
    > typesetter and publisher. It's no longer a closed shop, thankfully. The
    > typesetter/publisher no longer controls content, and nor should (s)he.


    I don't think they have for 20 years. I had even more typographic
    control (albeit monochrome) of my content then than I do with the web
    today. The main differences today are that:

    * I used to publish to a hundred or so, people whom I already knew
    and had addresses for. Now I'm in broadcast media rather than
    mailshots. I can leave my content up for people to find, I can send it
    to people "on spec" with a very lightweight knowledge of who they are,
    and I can stay in contact with transient people far mor easily, even
    when they shift addresses.

    * I _need_ high quality colour images if anyone's to read it - it's
    difficult to get the facebook generation to read text-only.

    * Cheap scalability means I can hit tens of thousands for the old
    price of a hundred.

    It does sadden me in some ways. Even the Bulletin of the Atomic
    Scientists has just stopped their old paper bulletin and gone totally
    on-line after 60 years of the Doomsday Clock.
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 19, 2009
    #18
  19. kttelibake

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Joy Beeson <> wrote:

    > On Thu, 19 Feb 2009 16:55:32 +1100, dorayme
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > I reckon that in *this* century though, put it *once* on a server and
    > > let the unlimited number read it as they please.

    >
    > Snirch. Here ya go:
    > http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/JanBan09.txt


    The beauty of putting it up on a server is that you can style it and
    never a need to send html emails...

    Good luck, anyway.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Feb 21, 2009
    #19
  20. kttelibake

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Joy Beeson <> wrote:

    > On Sat, 21 Feb 2009 13:59:11 +1100, dorayme
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > The beauty of putting it up on a server is that you can style it and
    > > never a need to send html emails...

    >
    > I have never once felt the slightest desire to send an HTML email.


    Yes, I had not meant to imply otherwise of course, just that once you
    put the newsletter on the server and distribute it by simply letting
    folks know it is there, you *have the option* to make it jazz it up with
    CSS and pics and stuff. Not that plain text has not got its attractions,
    mind you.

    (I used to receive newsletters from font foundries/ font distributors
    and they were so attractive I was reluctant to unsubscribe even though
    half the time I never read them.)

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Feb 21, 2009
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Mitchua
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    7,159
    Ice Demon
    Jul 15, 2003
  2. =?Utf-8?B?S2hhaXJvbA==?=
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    378
    =?Utf-8?B?S2hhaXJvbA==?=
    Dec 10, 2004
  3. DigitalUncle
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    992
    DigitalUncle
    Nov 2, 2004
  4. Adam Akhtar
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    596
    Florian Gilcher
    Aug 16, 2008
  5. Ton den Hartog

    when use ID and when use NAME in a HTML tag ??

    Ton den Hartog, Nov 30, 2003, in forum: Javascript
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    146
    GIMME
    Dec 2, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page