How do we "somewhat" control print size- web page

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Phil, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. Phil

    Phil Guest

    Im not a designer or developer...but for a children's website with
    paper doll images, we want to have a printables page - but realize it
    is impossible to guarantee printed image size due to variations
    (resolution of printer setting, screen, etc.).

    We do not want to do it as pdf, which would allow control of image
    size, because we want a doll's name to merge onto the printable page
    adjacent to doll, and to do this with pdf would require dynamic merge
    generation software....plenty available, but we want to avoid
    complexity and forcing a child to download first.

    So question is, is there some way to "somewhat" control the printed
    image size (meaning the html page size with the doll image on it)
    across various viewers browser types (I've seen mention of CSS
    elsewhere- useful)

    Need not be exact...we want it to print somewhere between "1.5 inches x
    4" to "2.5 x 7" ish...

    Aside from extensive instructions on page as to how to set printer,
    res. etc, any suggestions? Thanks.
     
    Phil, Feb 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. Phil

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 11 Feb 2006 06:43:53 -0800, "Phil" <> wrote:

    >Im not a designer or developer...but for a children's website with
    >paper doll images, we want to have a printables page - but realize it
    >is impossible to guarantee printed image size due to variations
    >(resolution of printer setting, screen, etc.).


    You can do this pretty robustly with CSS.

    Learn about @media print { ... } in your CSS and use sizes in
    absolute units, like mm. Use position: absolute; too, and to set the
    position of the child's name element.

    You can set the size of a bounding box and an image to a physical
    dimension that will print quite accurately. Position on the paper will
    vary a bit, depending on user settings, but so long as your bounding
    element box is "about a page" in size, it will behave for you. Make it
    small enough to allow reasonable margins on both US Letter and Euro A4
    paper. Make it large enough that "100%" and "Scale to fit" both give
    reasonable results.

    >We do not want to do it as pdf, which would allow control of image
    >size, because we want a doll's name to merge onto the printable page
    >adjacent to doll, and to do this with pdf would require dynamic merge
    >generation software..


    It;s really not that hard to generate PDFs, if you went that route..
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. Phil

    Phil Guest

    Andy, thanks for the info. Is CSS a "language" that most hosts support?
    I just looked at the marketing page of our current host an dit lists
    what they support: Cgi, perl, jsp, python....etc, but no mention of
    CSS....
     
    Phil, Feb 11, 2006
    #3
  4. Phil

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Andy Dingley wrote:

    > US Letter and Euro A4


    International A4. A4 is used as the standard letter-sized paper virtually
    *everywhere* outside the US -- certainly not just Europe.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Feb 11, 2006
    #4
  5. Phil

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Phil wrote:

    > Andy, thanks for the info. Is CSS a "language" that most hosts support?


    Your host doesn't need to "support" CSS.

    http://www.w3.org/Style/CSS/

    I'm surprised that there are still people out there who don't know what
    CSS is, given that it's been the standard method of suggesting most
    aspects of website style and design for ten years.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Feb 11, 2006
    #5
  6. Phil

    Phil Guest

    I should have googled a little further before asking last question....I
    see its "client side". Thanks again.
     
    Phil, Feb 11, 2006
    #6
  7. On Sat, 11 Feb 2006, Toby Inkster wrote:

    > Phil wrote:
    >
    > > Andy, thanks for the info. Is CSS a "language" that most hosts
    > > support?

    >
    > Your host doesn't need to "support" CSS.


    Well, not exactly "support", but it needs to send it out with a
    Content-type of text/css : not as text/plain, and certainly not as
    application/x-pointplus, of which there *still* seem to be some
    examples in the wild.

    One web service provider that was getting it wrong responded to their
    customer's complaint by saying that they did not support CSS, and had
    no plans to do so. Talk about clue-impaired? Oh yes, here it is,
    April 2003, Message-id was b897l4$lge$

    As we see (at least, those who have the patience to trawl through the
    longwinded arguments on that thread about RFC2616 compliance), the
    original poster *was* able to overcome their provider's blindspot by
    use of their own .htaccess directive.
     
    Alan J. Flavell, Feb 11, 2006
    #7
  8. Alan J. Flavell wrote:

    > and certainly not as application/x-pointplus, of which there *still*
    > seem to be some examples in the wild.


    I have an account with one of the larger US ISPs, AT&T Worldnet. I've
    also been telling them for *years* that CSS is not
    application/x-pointplus.

    Guess what?

    Warning: The stylesheet https://webauth.att.net/css/sso_styles.css was
    loaded as CSS even though its MIME type, "application/x-pointplus", is
    not "text/css".

    Their web authoring team fits in with that clue pheromones thingy you
    posted the other day. <g>

    --
    -bts
    -Warning: I brake for lawn deer
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Feb 12, 2006
    #8
  9. Phil

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 11 Feb 2006 15:02:04 -0800, "Phil" <> wrote:

    >I should have googled a little further before asking last question....I
    >see its "client side". Thanks again.


    If you're that new to CSS, then I suggest the Lie & Bos book "Cascading
    Style Sheets" as the most approachable introduction.
    <http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0321193121/codesmiths-20>

    CSS really isn't that difficult, but it's poorly explained by nearly all
    web books and so many people run into more trouble with it than it
    deserves.
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 12, 2006
    #9
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