How people look up C++

Discussion in 'C++' started by Eurig Jones, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. Eurig Jones

    Eurig Jones Guest

    As i've just started C++ and being quite experienced with a similar OOP
    language such as Java, i'm used to Java's online class library reference
    which is basicaly my bible when I'm coding whether its Java's standard
    routines or extras such as Java 3D. I was wondering if there was anything
    similar available, if not, how do you look up something? whats the best book
    to get as a look up book for the standard libraries?

    --
    ------------------------------
    E u r i g J o n e s
    ------------------------------
    Eurig Jones, Jan 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. Eurig Jones wrote:

    > As i've just started C++ and being quite experienced with a similar OOP
    > language such as Java, i'm used to Java's online class library reference
    > which is basicaly my bible when I'm coding whether its Java's standard
    > routines or extras such as Java 3D. I was wondering if there was anything
    > similar available, if not, how do you look up something? whats the best book
    > to get as a look up book for the standard libraries?
    >


    For the standard library one of the best books available is "The C++
    Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference" by Nicolai Josuttis. This is
    *only* a library reference though - it contains little about the
    language itself. It also doesn't cover the C library that was inherited
    by C++, so that can be a bit of a problem. I usually pull out K&R2 ("The
    C Programming Language" 2nd edition, Kernighan & Ritchie) to look up C
    functions - but even this is missing some (those that were added with
    Normative Addendum 1 in 1995, dealing mostly with wide and multi-byte
    characters and strings).

    Alternatively, you could get a copy of the C++ standard. Last I heard
    you could buy and download an electronic copy from the ANSI store for
    $18US. Drafts are also available for free on the C++ committee's web
    page. The November 1997 draft (the latest one that's available, as far
    as I have been able to determine) can be found in html format here:

    http://std.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/wp/html/nov97-2/

    Finally, Dinkumware (http://www.dinkumware.com/) has online references
    for C and C++. You'll get an occasional nag screen while browsing, and
    there's a strict license that prevents you from saving the pages for
    later use. You can also purchase a copy of their reference.

    -Kevin
    --
    My email address is valid, but changes periodically.
    To contact me please use the address from a recent posting.
    Kevin Goodsell, Jan 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. "Kevin Goodsell" <> wrote in
    message news:R6hRb.27894$...
    > Eurig Jones wrote:
    >
    > > As i've just started C++ and being quite experienced with a

    similar OOP
    > > language such as Java, i'm used to Java's online class library

    reference
    > > which is basicaly my bible when I'm coding whether its Java's

    standard
    > > routines or extras such as Java 3D. I was wondering if there was

    anything
    > > similar available, if not, how do you look up something? whats the

    best book
    > > to get as a look up book for the standard libraries?
    > >

    >
    > For the standard library one of the best books available is "The C++
    > Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference" by Nicolai Josuttis.

    This is
    > *only* a library reference though - it contains little about the
    > language itself. It also doesn't cover the C library that was

    inherited
    > by C++, so that can be a bit of a problem. I usually pull out K&R2

    ("The
    > C Programming Language" 2nd edition, Kernighan & Ritchie) to look up

    C
    > functions - but even this is missing some (those that were added

    with
    > Normative Addendum 1 in 1995, dealing mostly with wide and

    multi-byte
    > characters and strings).
    >
    > Alternatively, you could get a copy of the C++ standard. Last I

    heard
    > you could buy and download an electronic copy from the ANSI store

    for
    > $18US. Drafts are also available for free on the C++ committee's web
    > page. The November 1997 draft (the latest one that's available, as

    far
    > as I have been able to determine) can be found in html format here:
    >
    > http://std.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/wp/html/nov97-2/
    >
    > Finally, Dinkumware (http://www.dinkumware.com/) has online

    references
    > for C and C++. You'll get an occasional nag screen while browsing,

    and
    > there's a strict license that prevents you from saving the pages for
    > later use. You can also purchase a copy of their reference.
    >


    This is all correct. I just want to add that if you've just started le
    arning C++, you definitely do not want to use the standard as your
    reference, as it is written in very technical language and has more
    detail than the beginner needs.

    But it is good to get a copy of the standard. At this late date, I
    would not recommend the draft standard. As of several weeks ago, the
    version of the standard available at the ANSI store had some
    formatting problems (no table of contents, no hyperlinks); a correct
    version is available at

    http://www.techstreet.com/cgi-bin/detail?product_id=1143945

    Jonathan
    Jonathan Turkanis, Jan 26, 2004
    #3
  4. Eurig Jones

    Corno Guest

    "Eurig Jones" <> wrote in message
    news:bv45ct$4is$1$...
    > As i've just started C++ and being quite experienced with a similar OOP
    > language such as Java, i'm used to Java's online class library reference
    > which is basicaly my bible when I'm coding whether its Java's standard
    > routines or extras such as Java 3D. I was wondering if there was anything
    > similar available, if not, how do you look up something? whats the best

    book
    > to get as a look up book for the standard libraries?
    >

    As I came from Java myself, I understand your question completely.
    What I found out is that this is one of the fundamental differences between
    java and C++; Where java has an big collection of libraries in the standard,
    it's very useful to have the class library reference online.
    C++ in essence only has the (very powerfull) standard template library (STL)
    in the standard. For this, the URL you are looking for is
    http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/

    However, you will likely need a lot of non standard (proprietary) libs.
    Consequently, the documentation of these libraries vary. For example, if
    you're going to program on windows using either the win32 api or MFC, you
    will find the information quite well documented in the MSDN library,
    etcetera.

    The links given to you in the other messages are not the equivalents of the
    class library reference of java for looking up functions but are useful
    tools for more insight in the language and the STL.

    HTH,

    Corno
    Corno, Jan 26, 2004
    #4
  5. Corno wrote:

    > C++ in essence only has the (very powerfull) standard template library (STL)
    > in the standard. For this, the URL you are looking for is
    > http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/


    I'm not sure if this is *the* STL or not, but you should be aware that
    "STL" is technically the name of a library which part of the C++
    standard library was based on. So there are some differences between STL
    and the C++ standard library. Even though the 'S' stands for "standard",
    the STL library is not part of the standard (though something similar is).

    People tend to use the term "STL" for the C++ standard library, but it's
    less ambiguous to just call it "the C++ standard library".

    My concern is that the link above might not describe the C++ standard
    library, but something similar, making it misleading. I don't know for
    sure whether this is the case or not.

    -Kevin
    --
    My email address is valid, but changes periodically.
    To contact me please use the address from a recent posting.
    Kevin Goodsell, Jan 27, 2004
    #5
  6. "Kevin Goodsell" <> wrote in
    message news:48iRb.28615$...
    > Corno wrote:
    >
    > > C++ in essence only has the (very powerfull) standard template

    library (STL)
    > > in the standard. For this, the URL you are looking for is
    > > http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/

    >
    > I'm not sure if this is *the* STL or not, but you should be aware

    that
    > "STL" is technically the name of a library which part of the C++
    > standard library was based on. So there are some differences between

    STL
    > and the C++ standard library. Even though the 'S' stands for

    "standard",
    > the STL library is not part of the standard (though something

    similar is).

    To clarify a bit ...

    SGI STL contains some templates and concepts which are not part of the
    standard, such as hash containers, ropes, trivial iterators, ... .

    Some people draw a distinction between STL and the version of the
    original STL which was incorporated into the standard. A more
    important distinction is between that part of the STL which is now
    standard (let's call it 'STL') and the standard library as a whole.
    The standard library contains elements, notably standard C headers and
    the IOStreams library, which are not part of the STL under any
    definition.

    Jonathan
    Jonathan Turkanis, Jan 27, 2004
    #6
  7. Eurig Jones

    MPBroida Guest

    Kevin Goodsell wrote:
    >
    > Eurig Jones wrote:
    >
    > > As i've just started C++ and being quite experienced with a similar OOP
    > > language such as Java, i'm used to Java's online class library reference
    > > which is basicaly my bible when I'm coding whether its Java's standard
    > > routines or extras such as Java 3D. I was wondering if there was anything
    > > similar available, if not, how do you look up something? whats the best book
    > > to get as a look up book for the standard libraries?
    > >

    >
    > For the standard library one of the best books available is "The C++
    > Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference" by Nicolai Josuttis. This is
    > *only* a library reference though - it contains little about the
    > language itself. It also doesn't cover the C library that was inherited
    > by C++, so that can be a bit of a problem. I usually pull out K&R2 ("The
    > C Programming Language" 2nd edition, Kernighan & Ritchie) to look up C
    > functions - but even this is missing some (those that were added with
    > Normative Addendum 1 in 1995, dealing mostly with wide and multi-byte
    > characters and strings).


    A very good book on the C Standard Library is:
    The Standard C Library
    by P.J. Plauger

    My copy is from 1992, but it's still a very good book.
    It gives you enough info that you could implement all
    of the library functions yourself.

    Mike
    MPBroida, Jan 27, 2004
    #7
  8. "MPBroida" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Kevin Goodsell wrote:


    >
    > A very good book on the C Standard Library is:
    > The Standard C Library
    > by P.J. Plauger
    >
    > My copy is from 1992, but it's still a very good book.
    > It gives you enough info that you could implement all
    > of the library functions yourself.
    >


    I use this one too.

    BTW, I would steer clear of "The C++ Standard Template Library", by
    Plauger, Stepanov, Lee and Musser -- despite its list of distinguished
    authors. Josuttis is much better.

    Jonathan
    Jonathan Turkanis, Jan 27, 2004
    #8
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