. how to dynamiclayy display a web page's url ?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by baaa, Mar 11, 2006.

  1. baaa

    baaa Guest

    hi

    this is my first post
    also css-html newbie

    but got a bunch of web pages

    is it possible
    sans javascript

    to
    automatically
    automagically
    dynamically

    post on every and each web page
    the URL thereof

    just by writing some external CSS
    ?

    as u can see
    i am the laziest webpage developer there is.!
    --

    baaa
     
    baaa, Mar 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. baaa

    Jim Moe Guest

    baaa wrote:
    >
    > is it possible
    > sans javascript
    >
    > to post on every and each web page
    > the URL thereof
    >

    The URL is already displayed in the URL bar. Why duplicate it in the page?

    --
    jmm (hyphen) list (at) sohnen-moe (dot) com
    (Remove .AXSPAMGN for email)
     
    Jim Moe, Mar 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. baaa

    Jose Guest

    > The URL is already displayed in the URL bar. Why duplicate it in the page?

    Is it reliable? Even through redirection?

    Jose
    --
    Money: what you need when you run out of brains.
    for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
     
    Jose, Mar 11, 2006
    #3
  4. baaa

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Jose wrote:

    >> The URL is already displayed in the URL bar.

    >
    > Is it reliable? Even through redirection?


    Of course it is.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Mar 11, 2006
    #4
  5. baaa

    Jose Guest

    >>>The URL is already displayed in the URL bar.
    >> Is it reliable? Even through redirection?

    > Of course it is.


    Uh... not really. I have a page at an .org address, and the .com
    redirects there. If I enter the .com in my browser, the .org page
    shows, but the title bar shows .com.

    Jose
    --
    Money: what you need when you run out of brains.
    for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
     
    Jose, Mar 11, 2006
    #5
  6. baaa

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Jose wrote:

    > Uh... not really. I have a page at an .org address, and the .com
    > redirects there. If I enter the .com in my browser, the .org page
    > shows, but the title bar shows .com.


    If the ".com" shows in the address bar, then you're still looking at the
    ".com" website. Of course, it may be that the ".com" website looks the
    same as the ".org" website.

    The only (semi-)exception to this rule is with framesets. With framesets,
    your browser is simultaneously displaying at least two documents -- the
    address bar only displays the address of one of these (the main frameset
    document).

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Mar 11, 2006
    #6
  7. Jose wrote:

    >>>> The URL is already displayed in the URL bar.
    >>>
    >>> Is it reliable? Even through redirection?

    >>
    >> Of course it is.

    >
    >
    > Uh... not really. I have a page at an .org address, and the .com
    > redirects there. If I enter the .com in my browser, the .org page
    > shows, but the title bar shows .com.



    Sure, dual registration, both domain names point to the same server
    folder, prime example http://www.whois.org/ and http://www.whois.net/

    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
     
    Jonathan N. Little, Mar 11, 2006
    #7
  8. baaa

    Jose Guest

    > If the ".com" shows in the address bar, then you're still looking at the
    > ".com" website.


    There's only one page - it is the .org page. .com is set up as a
    redirect. Maybe the OP wants (in this example, for example) to indicate
    that the page's "true" address is .org. (to the extent that "true" has
    any meaning).

    I've also heard (but don't know) that the address bar is vulnerable to
    alteration via scripts. True or false?

    Jose
    --
    Money: what you need when you run out of brains.
    for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
     
    Jose, Mar 11, 2006
    #8
  9. baaa

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Jose wrote:

    > There's only one page - it is the .org page. .com is set up as a
    > redirect.


    If it redirects, then the address bar will reflect this by changing.

    If the address bar doesn't change, then it hasn't redirected.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Mar 11, 2006
    #9
  10. baaa

    Jose Guest

    > If it redirects, then the address bar will reflect this by changing.
    >
    > If the address bar doesn't change, then it hasn't redirected.


    Ok, then what does happen? There's only one file on the server. It can
    be reached either of two ways.

    Jose
    --
    Money: what you need when you run out of brains.
    for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
     
    Jose, Mar 11, 2006
    #10
  11. baaa

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Jose wrote:

    > Ok, then what does happen? There's only one file on the server. It can
    > be reached either of two ways.


    Then that is two seperate addresses which just happen to have the same
    content.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Mar 11, 2006
    #11
  12. Jose wrote:

    >> If the ".com" shows in the address bar, then you're still looking at the
    >> ".com" website.

    >
    >
    > There's only one page - it is the .org page. .com is set up as a
    > redirect. Maybe the OP wants (in this example, for example) to indicate
    > that the page's "true" address is .org. (to the extent that "true" has
    > any meaning).
    >
    > I've also heard (but don't know) that the address bar is vulnerable to
    > alteration via scripts. True or false?
    >
    > Jose

    With IE <=6 you can put a fake address bar image over top of the real
    address bar (kinda speaks to why scripting the chrome is a bad idea for
    all those who lament that in Gecko you cannot style the scrollbars and
    such like IE).

    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
     
    Jonathan N. Little, Mar 11, 2006
    #12
  13. Jose wrote:

    >> If it redirects, then the address bar will reflect this by changing.
    >>
    >> If the address bar doesn't change, then it hasn't redirected.

    >
    >
    > Ok, then what does happen? There's only one file on the server. It can
    > be reached either of two ways.
    >


    Possible or the other can be a folder with an .htaccess file with a
    directive to redirect to the one URL or a server side script could do it.


    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
     
    Jonathan N. Little, Mar 11, 2006
    #13
  14. On Sat, 11 Mar 2006, Toby Inkster wrote:

    > Jose wrote:
    >
    > > Ok, then what does happen? There's only one file on the server.
    > > It can be reached either of two ways.

    >
    > Then that is two seperate addresses which just happen to have the
    > same content.


    Indeed. Which is poor netiquette (or should I say webiquette?). It
    would be better to configure the server to issue 301 permanent
    redirect, from the non-preferred name(s) of the server to its
    preferred name. In Apache this is easy enough.
     
    Alan J. Flavell, Mar 11, 2006
    #14
  15. baaa

    Jose Guest

    > Indeed. Which is poor netiquette (or should I say webiquette?). It
    > would be better to configure the server to issue 301 permanent
    > redirect, from the non-preferred name(s) of the server to its
    > preferred name. In Apache this is easy enough.


    Thanks... when I get the keys to the website I'll do that. What does
    the user get? A 301 not found? Or do they get sent to the right page
    with the right domain?

    Jose
    --
    Money: what you need when you run out of brains.
    for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
     
    Jose, Mar 12, 2006
    #15
  16. baaa

    David Segall Guest

    Jose <> wrote:

    >> The URL is already displayed in the URL bar. Why duplicate it in the page?

    >
    >Is it reliable? Even through redirection?

    Not entirely. Cloaking enables a web page to be hosted at one domain
    but appear to be hosted at another. I suppose any use of frames makes
    it difficult to define the "real" address of an entire web page.
     
    David Segall, Mar 12, 2006
    #16
  17. baaa

    Toby Inkster Guest

    David Segall wrote:

    > I suppose any use of frames makes it difficult to define the "real"
    > address of an entire web page.


    The "real" address is that of the frameset, which is displayed by the
    address bar with utmost reliability.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Mar 12, 2006
    #17
  18. baaa

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Jose wrote:

    > A 301 not found? Or do they get sent to the right page with the right
    > domain?


    404 is Not Found.

    301 is a Permanent Redirect.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Mar 12, 2006
    #18
  19. baaa

    David Segall Guest

    Toby Inkster <> wrote:

    >David Segall wrote:
    >
    >> I suppose any use of frames makes it difficult to define the "real"
    >> address of an entire web page.

    >
    >The "real" address is that of the frameset, which is displayed by the
    >address bar with utmost reliability.

    That is true by definition. However, cloaking is designed to provide
    one address for the address bar while ensuring that the viewer sees
    only the content from another address. If the OP was interested in the
    source of the content rather than the source of the frameset the
    address bar is not the place to look.
     
    David Segall, Mar 12, 2006
    #19
  20. baaa

    Jose Guest

    > 404 is Not Found.
    >
    > 301 is a Permanent Redirect.


    With a 404 I get a page that says "404 not found" or somesuch. With a
    301 I get a page that says.... what? "Permanent Redirect"? And what
    do the clients do with that?

    Jose
    --
    Money: what you need when you run out of brains.
    for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
     
    Jose, Mar 12, 2006
    #20
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