how would a user like these options

Discussion in 'HTML' started by VisionSet, Sep 17, 2003.

  1. VisionSet

    VisionSet Guest

    I have a small number (lets say 3) mutually exclusive ranges that I require
    the user to select zero or one of.

    eg:
    0-9
    A-Z
    a-z

    so the user could ignore the <select>s (or whatever)
    or choose *one* of the following for example:

    3-7
    B-T
    p-r

    How would you presnt this to the user / what would the user expect?

    I could put them all in one pair of <select>s but then you could get eg 5-M
    I guess I could do this and return errors, or convert 5-M to 5-9 or A-M
    explaining to the user what happened, but is there any other approach?

    --
    Mike W
     
    VisionSet, Sep 17, 2003
    #1
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  2. VisionSet

    SeeSchloss Guest

    > I have a small number (lets say 3) mutually exclusive ranges that
    > I require the user to select zero or one of.
    >
    > eg:
    > 0-9
    > A-Z
    > a-z
    >
    > so the user could ignore the <select>s (or whatever)
    > or choose *one* of the following for example:
    >
    > 3-7
    > B-T
    > p-r
    >
    > How would you presnt this to the user / what would the user
    > expect?
    >
    > I could put them all in one pair of <select>s but then you could
    > get eg 5-M I guess I could do this and return errors, or convert
    > 5-M to 5-9 or A-M explaining to the user what happened, but is
    > there any other approach?


    Maybe you could prevent the user to choose different types
    with javascript, for example when you select a digit in the
    first <select>, only digits appear in the second ?
    Or three <select>s : the first one to choose between
    digits/capital letters/miniature letters, and the other
    ones would display only the type selected in the first one
    ?

    But don't ask me how to do this :p


    --
    SeeSchlo├č - http://gpu.sourceforge.net
     
    SeeSchloss, Sep 17, 2003
    #2
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  3. "VisionSet" <> wrote:

    > I have a small number (lets say 3) mutually exclusive ranges that I
    > require the user to select zero or one of.
    >
    > eg:
    > 0-9
    > A-Z
    > a-z


    Sounds like a job for checkboxes.

    > so the user could ignore the <select>s (or whatever)
    > or choose *one* of the following for example:


    Pardon? How does this relate? And please explain the real problem, it'll
    be much more understandable than the dummy example.

    > I could put them all in one pair of <select>s but then you could get
    > eg 5-M I guess I could do this and return errors, or convert 5-M to
    > 5-9 or A-M explaining to the user what happened, but is there any
    > other approach?


    Sorry, the formulation is far too confusing.

    Anyway, in HTML forms, you can do very simple things only. It sounds you
    need to tell users to select so-and-so _or_ so-and-so, and to check in the
    form handler that an acceptable selection has been made. If you have spare
    time, you could later add client-side pre-checking, but it would be
    somewhat redundant: if you give simple instructions, and the user ignores
    them, it's fair to throw some error message from the form handler, without
    trying to catch the problem client-side.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Sep 17, 2003
    #3
  4. VisionSet

    Chris Morris Guest

    "VisionSet" <> writes:
    > I have a small number (lets say 3) mutually exclusive ranges that I require
    > the user to select zero or one of.
    > 3-7
    > B-T
    > p-r
    >
    > How would you presnt this to the user / what would the user expect?


    No idea what the user would _expect_, it's not something I've seen
    before. However, the idea below is based on something similar, and
    users seem fine with it.

    > I could put them all in one pair of <select>s but then you could get eg 5-M
    > I guess I could do this and return errors,


    Simplest on the form, at least.

    > or convert 5-M to 5-9 or A-M


    Which one - it's arbitrary, I'd advise against it.

    > explaining to the user what happened, but is there any other approach?


    [radio] None
    [radio] Numeric From [select] To [select]
    [radio] Lowercase From [select] To [select]
    [radio] Uppercase From [select] To [select]

    The selects only have the appropriate thing for their range, the radio
    button chooses which select to parse (if any). Obviously you also
    have to make sure your server-side process deals with a range like R-G
    properly. Exactly what properly *is* depends on the application.

    --
    Chris
     
    Chris Morris, Sep 18, 2003
    #4
  5. VisionSet

    VisionSet Guest

    "Chris Morris" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > [radio] None
    > [radio] Numeric From [select] To [select]
    > [radio] Lowercase From [select] To [select]
    > [radio] Uppercase From [select] To [select]
    >
    > The selects only have the appropriate thing for their range, the radio
    > button chooses which select to parse (if any). Obviously you also
    > have to make sure your server-side process deals with a range like R-G
    > properly. Exactly what properly *is* depends on the application.


    Naturally. It transparently inverts the range.

    Thankyou, I hadn't considered that one.
    I could also ditch the '[radio] none'.
    Another is to have the 3 sets of selects and the 1st <option> being a 'not
    selected'.
    I quite like the JS idea posted by SeeSchloss too.
    --
    Mike W
     
    VisionSet, Sep 18, 2003
    #5
  6. VisionSet

    Chris Morris Guest

    "VisionSet" <> writes:
    > "Chris Morris" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > [radio] None
    > > [radio] Numeric From [select] To [select]
    > > [radio] Lowercase From [select] To [select]
    > > [radio] Uppercase From [select] To [select]

    >
    > I could also ditch the '[radio] none'.


    Worth keeping it, I think, since it gives a sensible default state for
    the user, and an easy way to tell if they accidentally pressed submit
    too early.

    > Another is to have the 3 sets of selects and the 1st <option> being a 'not
    > selected'.


    What do you do if a user uses two of them? The radio button makes it
    explicit that they can only select one range, and makes it easier to
    process in the server-side too.

    > I quite like the JS idea posted by SeeSchloss too.


    If you use that, make sure it's usable without JS, and your
    server-side process is able to reject bad pairs anyway.

    --
    Chris
     
    Chris Morris, Sep 20, 2003
    #6
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