Html page without any Html tag in its source

Discussion in 'HTML' started by lovecreatesbea...@gmail.com, Jul 26, 2007.

  1. Guest

    I don't see any Html tag in some Html pages, for example, this one:

    http://ftp.gnu.org/README

    How does it make paragraphs, newlines ... without <P>, <BR> ...
    respectively? And how does it present < and > without &lt; and &gt; ?
    Does it use some CSS to achieve that?

    Thanks
     
    , Jul 26, 2007
    #1
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  2. asdf Guest

    "" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I don't see any Html tag in some Html pages, for example, this one:
    >
    > http://ftp.gnu.org/README
    >
    > How does it make paragraphs, newlines ... without <P>, <BR> ...
    > respectively? And how does it present < and > without &lt; and &gt; ?
    > Does it use some CSS to achieve that?
    >
    > Thanks
    >


    Answer:

    It's not an html page. It's a text document on an FTP server.

    Newlines are probably the carriage return/line feed character. '<' is an
    ascii character, so it's valid text anyway.

    No smoke or mirrors, no CSS :))
     
    asdf, Jul 26, 2007
    #2
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  3. "" <> writes:

    > I don't see any Html tag in some Html pages, for example, this one:
    >
    > http://ftp.gnu.org/README


    That's not an HTML page.

    > How does it make paragraphs, newlines ... without <P>, <BR> ...
    > respectively? And how does it present < and > without &lt; and &gt; ?


    Same way it's done in any plain text file.

    sherm--

    --
    Web Hosting by West Virginians, for West Virginians: http://wv-www.net
    Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
     
    Sherm Pendley, Jul 26, 2007
    #3
  4. Guest

    On Jul 26, 9:43 am, "asdf" <> wrote:
    > "" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > >I don't see any Html tag in some Html pages, for example, this one:

    >
    > >http://ftp.gnu.org/README

    >
    > > How does it make paragraphs, newlines ... without <P>, <BR> ...
    > > respectively? And how does it present < and > without &lt; and &gt; ?
    > > Does it use some CSS to achieve that?

    >
    > > Thanks

    >
    > Answer:
    >
    > It's not an html page. It's a text document on an FTP server.
    >
    > Newlines are probably the carriage return/line feed character. '<' is an
    > ascii character, so it's valid text anyway.
    >
    > No smoke or mirrors, no CSS :))


    Thanks asdf and Sherm Pendley.

    Does FTP server present any file (including plain text file) same as
    WEB server presents Html files? Can it present graph, Forms,
    tables ...?
     
    , Jul 26, 2007
    #4
  5. I V Guest

    On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 11:43:46 +1000, asdf wrote:
    > "" <> wrote in message
    >> http://ftp.gnu.org/README

    [...]
    > It's not an html page. It's a text document on an FTP server.


    Well, it's a text document on an http server that happens to be called
    "ftp".
     
    I V, Jul 26, 2007
    #5
  6. asdf Guest

    "I V" <> wrote in message
    news:QATpi.24662$...
    > On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 11:43:46 +1000, asdf wrote:
    >> "" <> wrote in
    >> message
    >>> http://ftp.gnu.org/README

    > [...]
    >> It's not an html page. It's a text document on an FTP server.

    >
    > Well, it's a text document on an http server that happens to be called
    > "ftp".


    Ok, point taken. You are right, the FTP content is being served via HTTP.
    It's a fair assumption that the HTTP server is simply being pointed at their
    FTP server, or that the FTP server also serves via HTTP.
     
    asdf, Jul 26, 2007
    #6
  7. I V Guest

    On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 14:07:11 +1000, asdf wrote:
    > Ok, point taken. You are right, the FTP content is being served via HTTP.
    > It's a fair assumption that the HTTP server is simply being pointed at their
    > FTP server, or that the FTP server also serves via HTTP.


    Indeed; I just didn't want the OP to get the impression that the effect
    she was interested in was caused by the FTP protocol, rather than serving
    a plain text document.
     
    I V, Jul 26, 2007
    #7
  8. wrote:

    > On Jul 26, 9:43 am, "asdf" <> wrote:
    >> "" <> wrote in
    >> message
    >>
    >> news:...
    >>
    >> >I don't see any Html tag in some Html pages, for example, this one:

    >>
    >> >http://ftp.gnu.org/README

    >>
    >> > How does it make paragraphs, newlines ... without <P>, <BR> ...
    >> > respectively? And how does it present < and > without &lt; and &gt; ?
    >> > Does it use some CSS to achieve that?

    >>
    >> > Thanks

    >>
    >> Answer:
    >>
    >> It's not an html page. It's a text document on an FTP server.
    >>
    >> Newlines are probably the carriage return/line feed character. '<' is an
    >> ascii character, so it's valid text anyway.
    >>
    >> No smoke or mirrors, no CSS :))

    >
    > Thanks asdf and Sherm Pendley.
    >
    > Does FTP server present any file (including plain text file) same as
    > WEB server presents Html files? Can it present graph, Forms,
    > tables ...?


    FTP and HTTP work a bit differently.
    With HTTP the server sends the file itself plus some metadata including what
    kind of file it is (e.g. HTML, plain text, MP3, ...), so the client knows
    how to handle it.
    FTP only send the data contained in the file without additional metadata.
    The client has to figure out what to do with the data, usually by looking
    at the filename, the data or asking the user.

    If both processes yield the same result (e.g. using the HTML renderer to
    display a given document), it does not make a difference, if FTP or HTTP is
    used.

    --
    Benjamin Niemann
    Email: pink at odahoda dot de
    WWW: http://pink.odahoda.de/
     
    Benjamin Niemann, Jul 26, 2007
    #8
  9. "" <> writes:

    > On Jul 26, 9:43 am, "asdf" <> wrote:
    >> "" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:...
    >>
    >> >I don't see any Html tag in some Html pages, for example, this one:

    >>
    >> >http://ftp.gnu.org/README

    >>
    >> > How does it make paragraphs, newlines ... without <P>, <BR> ...
    >> > respectively? And how does it present < and > without &lt; and &gt; ?
    >> > Does it use some CSS to achieve that?

    >>
    >> > Thanks

    >>
    >> Answer:
    >>
    >> It's not an html page. It's a text document on an FTP server.
    >>
    >> Newlines are probably the carriage return/line feed character. '<' is an
    >> ascii character, so it's valid text anyway.
    >>
    >> No smoke or mirrors, no CSS :))

    >
    > Thanks asdf and Sherm Pendley.
    >
    > Does FTP server present any file (including plain text file) same as
    > WEB server presents Html files? Can it present graph, Forms,
    > tables ...?


    Note that the above is not coming from an FTP server; if it were, the URL
    would be ftp: instead of http:, which is a web server. The host name (in
    the above, ftp.gnu.org) has nothing to do with the protocol that's used.
    That's determined by the scheme, which in the above is http:.

    What's more, a web server doesn't "present graph, forms, tables"; all it
    does is send the appropriate MIME type (text/html, text/plain, image/gif,
    etc.) for the file it's serving - it's up to the client to handle each
    type however it sees fit.

    But to answer your question, no, FTP servers do not send MIME types. Most
    of the time it doesn't matter; an FTP client normally just saves the file
    to disk anyway, regardless of its type.

    sherm--

    --
    Web Hosting by West Virginians, for West Virginians: http://wv-www.net
    Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
     
    Sherm Pendley, Jul 26, 2007
    #9
  10. "asdf" <> writes:

    > Ok, point taken. You are right, the FTP content is being served via HTTP.


    There's no such thing as "FTP content". If something is being served via
    HTTP, there's no FTP server involved in the transaction at all.

    > It's a fair assumption that the HTTP server is simply being pointed at their
    > FTP server, or that the FTP server also serves via HTTP.


    No it's not - if it's serving via HTTP, it's not an FTP server.

    It's a fair assumption, given the hostname of "ftp", that there's *also* an
    FTP server running on that host, but that fact has absolutely no bearing on
    how the HTTP server behaves.

    sherm--

    --
    Web Hosting by West Virginians, for West Virginians: http://wv-www.net
    Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
     
    Sherm Pendley, Jul 26, 2007
    #10
  11. Guest

    On Jul 26, 9:48 am, Sherm Pendley <> wrote:
    > "" <> writes:
    > > I don't see any Html tag in some Html pages, for example, this one:

    >
    > >http://ftp.gnu.org/README

    >
    > That's not an HTML page.


    I find that both http://ftp.gnu.org/README and ftp://ftp.gnu.org/README
    (on IE6, I request ftp://ftp.gnu.org then double click on README.) get
    exact the same file.

    > > How does it make paragraphs, newlines ... without <P>, <BR> ...
    > > respectively? And how does it present < and > without &lt; and &gt; ?

    >
    > Same way it's done in any plain text file.


    Thank you.

    I now have one more question.

    Are the plain text files such as .txt, .c (source file of C code,
    text), .sh (source file of Bourne shell code, text) on HTTP server
    same as them presented on any brouwser? Do they have the same
    appearance and layout including new-lines, continuous blanks on any
    browser? Is it the same behavior cross browsers, does the standard
    specifications specify this?

    If I want to put some plain and simple text files on HTTP server, can
    I choose filename suffixes such as .txt, .c, .h, .sh other than .htm
    or .html? Is it a good choice?
     
    , Jul 29, 2007
    #11
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