HTTP File Upload status bar and firewall...

Discussion in 'Java' started by Craig Coffey, Dec 4, 2003.

  1. Craig Coffey

    Craig Coffey Guest

    -- WARNING, INCOMING LONG-WINDED MESSAGE --

    Ok, so I went through all this trouble to actually create an HTTP
    File Upload status bar using the MultipartRequest stuff from Jason
    Hunter. It shows the filename, size, bytes transferred, and a neat
    little status bar with percentage done. It works, and looks purdy.
    So, then I put this up on our external server, and try it out,
    and... It transfers the file, but there is no filename, size or bytes,
    and the status bar stays at 0% until the file is done (or almost done)
    and then jumps to 100% (or close to it) right at the end of the file
    transfer.
    The status bar works fine if I remotely control the machine, and
    perform a local file transfer... Odd.
    Let me explain, quickly, what I have done. Basically, when you say
    you want to transfer a file, you get a popup window. This window has
    2 frames; The top frame has the html form with the file field, and
    the bottom from (which is size 0, and thus invisible) is the target of
    that form. When the form is submitted, the file transfer is actually
    happening in the invisible frame, and the top frame loads a JSP which
    displays the status of the file transfer. The actuall file transfer
    java class (MultipartRequest) keeps track of the status, stuffs it
    into a simple object, and tosses that object into the session scope.
    This object is looked for by the status JSP (which reloads every 5
    seconds). When it finds this object, it grabs it, and uses the info
    in it to display all the neat stuff I spoke of.
    So... As I said, this works fine and dandy, and believe it or not,
    does not affect the speed of the tranfer (I tested it against FTP
    ALOT). But it doesn't seem to work through the firewall of our
    external site. My theory is that the firewall is reading the entire
    header to make sure that it is well formed before it passes it onto
    the server itself. Since the file is actually PART of the header
    (right?) it is loaded onto the firewall first, and THEN sent to the
    server. The transfer to the server (since it is local) is very fast,
    and thus the start to finish of the file transfer from the status bars
    point of view is also very fast.
    And, that is my dilema. This is just a theory, and therefore I ask,
    is this theory sound? Does this sound like a firewall problem? Or
    does it sound like I need to revisit my Java code?
    I realize that this whole situation walks a fine line between
    internet security and java programming. And if my theory is correct,
    that it is actually on the OTHER side of that line, and thus not
    appropriate for this ng, but I had to start somewhere, so please be
    gentle with me :)

    -Craig Coffey

    PS- My REAL email is ccoffey@ (without the N0SP@M),
    but I was forced to use Google for the post, and couldn't use a fake
    email. Thnaks Yahoo! :)
     
    Craig Coffey, Dec 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. Craig Coffey

    Tim Ward Guest

    "Craig Coffey" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > But it doesn't seem to work through the firewall of our
    > external site. My theory is that the firewall is reading the entire
    > header to make sure that it is well formed before it passes it onto
    > the server itself.


    Firewall could well be collecting the whole file, in either direction, to
    check for viruses etc. Attempts to measure progress at the client and at the
    server could well produce totally different results.

    --
    Tim Ward
    Brett Ward Limited - www.brettward.co.uk
     
    Tim Ward, Dec 4, 2003
    #2
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  3. Craig Coffey

    Harald Hein Guest

    "Craig Coffey" wrote:

    > My theory is that the firewall is reading the entire
    > header to make sure that it is well formed before it passes it onto
    > the server itself.


    Then verify your theory. Read then firewall documentation or get the
    packet sniffer out of the toolbox and fire it up.
     
    Harald Hein, Dec 4, 2003
    #3
  4. Craig Coffey

    Craig Coffey Guest

    I don't have access to the firewall docs, since it is a dedicated
    hosting solution. I don't even know which firewall they are using
    (yet), but I am currently trying to get in touch with their security
    expert to discuss this. My initial attempts to do so through the
    standard customer service reps was met with a "..I seriously doubt it
    has anything to do with our firewall...". Nice. Thanks for the help.
    Next time, kiss me first. :p

    Sniffer, Heh... I was afraid you were going to suggest that. *sigh*
    Time to load snort on the server.

    At least it sounds like I am on the right track.

    Thanks,
    -CC
     
    Craig Coffey, Dec 5, 2003
    #4
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