I am studying c myself .Which books I should read?

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Solo.Wolve, Nov 26, 2006.

  1. Solo.Wolve

    Solo.Wolve Guest

    Well,I read <c primer plus> before,and I just got a primary
    conclusion about c.
    Can somebody show me some books to read and something to do ?
    I study c myself.btw,I am not a student,
    Thanks.
    Solo.Wolve, Nov 26, 2006
    #1
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  2. Solo.Wolve wrote:
    > Well,I read <c primer plus> before,and I just got a primary
    > conclusion about c.
    > Can somebody show me some books to read and something to do ?
    > I study c myself.btw,I am not a student,
    > Thanks.
    >

    You probably need to try K&R: The C programming language 2nd edition.
    That's a good book we use that too.

    --
    Leslie Kis-Adam or
    Laszlo Kis-Adam or even
    Kis-Ádám László

    Student
    Budapest University of Technology and Economics
    Faculty of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
    <dfighter_AT_NOSPAM_freemail.hu>
    Leslie Kis-Adam, Nov 26, 2006
    #2
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  3. Solo.Wolve

    Guest

    "Solo.Wolve дµÀ£º
    "
    > Well,I read <c primer plus> before,and I just got a primary
    > conclusion about c.
    > Can somebody show me some books to read and something to do ?
    > I study c myself.btw,I am not a student,
    > Thanks.


    Well, you are just in time. C is mature now also the compiler. K & R
    (aka "The C Programming Language"), "C: A Reference Manual", and "C
    Interface and Implememtations: Technology for Creating Reusable
    Software" are my recommendations.
    Good luck!

    Mao..
    , Nov 26, 2006
    #3
  4. Solo.Wolve

    Solo.Wolve Guest

    Well,what else should I do beside reading the c programming language?
    Would you think that reading some code may help much? If so,can you
    show me some URL that afford such things?
    And,what else can you recommend ?
    Thank you very much.
    Solo.Wolve, Nov 28, 2006
    #4
  5. Solo.Wolve

    CBFalconer Guest

    "Solo.Wolve" wrote:
    >
    > Well,what else should I do beside reading the c programming
    > language? Would you think that reading some code may help much?
    > If so,can you show me some URL that afford such things?
    > And,what else can you recommend ?


    You should quote sufficient material from whatever you are
    answering for your reply to make sense. You should follow commas
    with a blank. And you can find lots of code to study by following
    this newsgroup. For one, you can snoop about the download section
    of my pages, URL below.

    --
    Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
    <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>
    CBFalconer, Nov 28, 2006
    #5
  6. Solo.Wolve said:

    > Well,what else should I do beside reading the c programming language?


    Do the exercises, and post your answers here, asking for comments. Then pay
    attention to the comments posted by experts (and ignore the chaff posted by
    the clueless). To distinguish the clueless from the experts, read this
    group for a while - which is in itself a worthy learning exercise.


    > Would you think that reading some code may help much?


    Sure, but whether it's to learn How To Do It or How Not To Do It kind of
    depends on who wrote the code.

    --
    Richard Heathfield
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
    http://www.cpax.org.uk
    email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
    Richard Heathfield, Nov 28, 2006
    #6
  7. Solo.Wolve

    santosh Guest

    Solo.Wolve wrote:
    > Well,what else should I do beside reading the c programming language?


    Maybe _after_ finishing The C Programming Language.

    > Would you think that reading some code may help much? If so,can you
    > show me some URL that afford such things?


    Yes reading _good_ code can expand your C thinking, but at the beginner
    stage it's difficult to evaluate foreign code. Thus you might consider
    some code snippet as nifty which might actually be bad C or programming
    practise.

    Thus, initially atleast, it's better to stick to known sources of
    excellent C like TCPL and acquire basic C knowledge before browsing the
    mountains of C code on the net.

    > And,what else can you recommend ?


    I've found that lurking and/or participating in this group is an
    excellent way to learn the best of C.

    After you've finished TCPL I recommend Expert C Programming, C
    Unleashed and C : A Reference Manual.

    Any or all of the above may be out of active printing, but you can
    still get good used copies.
    santosh, Nov 28, 2006
    #7
  8. Solo.Wolve

    Default User Guest

    Solo.Wolve wrote:

    > Well,what else should I do beside reading the c programming language?
    > Would you think that reading some code may help much? If so,can you
    > show me some URL that afford such things?
    > And,what else can you recommend ?
    > Thank you very much.



    I'm generally of the opinion that for learners reading other people's
    code isn't particularly helpful in learning to program. It does teach
    to read code, which is a useful and allied skill, but not to write code
    particularly.

    For that, I recommend finding a reasonably-sized project and start to
    work on it. Have a definite goal for the project, what the final state
    will be, what the program can.

    My own training tool was a text-adventure game, of the Zork type. This
    had many advantages, the main one being that I was interested in the
    subject. It also involved reading and parsing user input, text
    manipulation, file I/O, and other useful aspects. Naturally, it's best
    to find something that's interesting to you.



    Brian
    Default User, Nov 28, 2006
    #8
  9. Solo.Wolve

    Guest

    I agree that one can learn a lot when he/she work on a
    reasonable project which he/she can manage.

    But before one can start his/her own project, one should
    pick up basic ability to write some simple to not so simple
    programs.

    Beginners needs exercise problems - simple programming tasks.
    After finishing those exercise problems, beginners can move on
    to a reasonable project.

    The following URL gives some exercise problems which
    beginners can work on.

    http://www.geocities.com/mysimpc/problems.html


    Default User wrote:
    > Solo.Wolve wrote:
    >
    > > Well,what else should I do beside reading the c programming language?
    > > Would you think that reading some code may help much? If so,can you
    > > show me some URL that afford such things?
    > > And,what else can you recommend ?
    > > Thank you very much.

    >
    >
    > I'm generally of the opinion that for learners reading other people's
    > code isn't particularly helpful in learning to program. It does teach
    > to read code, which is a useful and allied skill, but not to write code
    > particularly.
    >
    > For that, I recommend finding a reasonably-sized project and start to
    > work on it. Have a definite goal for the project, what the final state
    > will be, what the program can.
    >
    > My own training tool was a text-adventure game, of the Zork type. This
    > had many advantages, the main one being that I was interested in the
    > subject. It also involved reading and parsing user input, text
    > manipulation, file I/O, and other useful aspects. Naturally, it's best
    > to find something that's interesting to you.
    >
    >
    >
    > Brian
    , Dec 15, 2006
    #9
  10. Richard Heathfield, Dec 15, 2006
    #10
  11. Solo.Wolve

    Default User Guest

    wrote:

    Please don't top-post. Your replies belong following or interspersed
    with properly trimmed quotes. See the majority of other posts in the
    newsgroup, or:
    <http://www.caliburn.nl/topposting.html>

    I've rearranged the text.

    > Default User wrote:
    > > Solo.Wolve wrote:
    > >
    > > > Well,what else should I do beside reading the c programming
    > > > language? Would you think that reading some code may help much?
    > > > If so,can you show me some URL that afford such things?
    > > > And,what else can you recommend ?
    > > > Thank you very much.

    > >
    > >
    > > I'm generally of the opinion that for learners reading other
    > > people's code isn't particularly helpful in learning to program. It
    > > does teach to read code, which is a useful and allied skill, but
    > > not to write code particularly.
    > >
    > > For that, I recommend finding a reasonably-sized project and start
    > > to work on it. Have a definite goal for the project, what the final
    > > state will be, what the program can.
    > >
    > > My own training tool was a text-adventure game, of the Zork type.
    > > This had many advantages, the main one being that I was interested
    > > in the subject. It also involved reading and parsing user input,
    > > text manipulation, file I/O, and other useful aspects. Naturally,
    > > it's best to find something that's interesting to you.


    Argh. Quite a lot of typos, thinkos, word ommissions, etc. I really
    need to look into that proof-reading business one of these days.

    > I agree that one can learn a lot when he/she work on a
    > reasonable project which he/she can manage.
    >
    > But before one can start his/her own project, one should
    > pick up basic ability to write some simple to not so simple
    > programs.
    >
    > Beginners needs exercise problems - simple programming tasks.
    > After finishing those exercise problems, beginners can move on
    > to a reasonable project.


    I would assume that we're talking about someone who has worked through
    a book doing the basic problem in it, and is now ready for the next
    step. Reading code certainly wouldn't be right for someone who's still
    less skilled than that.

    I'd say buy K&R2, work through and do their exercises, and you'd be
    ready to start doing real programs.

    > The following URL gives some exercise problems which
    > beginners can work on.
    >
    > http://www.geocities.com/mysimpc/problems.html


    As is the case with most such links, the resources vary from pretty to
    pretty bad. The Steve Summit one is probably ok for someone who is
    still working through the text.



    Brian
    Default User, Dec 15, 2006
    #11
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