I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a couple ofyour favorite questions I can use

Discussion in 'C++' started by jaialai technology, Dec 1, 2009.

  1. I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)
    This is for a beginner. Sadly, the job is in India and I will be
    interviewing this guy
    over the phone from the US. So, no "write me some code that does X"
    type questions
    which are my favorites.
    For a beginner I would have them start out with some simple looping,
    pointers,
    class definitions, etc etc just to see they have a foundation. Plus
    other stuff too, of course
    but this is out of the question given that this is all over the phone.
    Plus, in my experience these guys are prone to...having a friend help,
    but that is
    a different story for another time.
    All I have for now is stuff like "what are the different kinds of
    inheritance? What is a virtual function?
    Why would you use a friend function?" Just trivia type questions
    really.
    Anyway, any advice? Obviously, I haven't given a ton of interviews in
    my time so I would
    appreciate some advice.
    Thanks!
     
    jaialai technology, Dec 1, 2009
    #1
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  2. Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a coupleof your favorite questions I can use?

    jaialai technology wrote:
    > I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    > What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)


    Just use some of the FAQs.

    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
     
    Victor Bazarov, Dec 1, 2009
    #2
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  3. jaialai technology

    dragan Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use?

    jaialai technology wrote:
    > I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    > What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)
    > This is for a beginner. Sadly, the job is in India and I will be
    > interviewing this guy
    > over the phone from the US. So, no "write me some code that does X"
    > type questions
    > which are my favorites.
    > For a beginner I would have them start out with some simple looping,
    > pointers,
    > class definitions, etc etc just to see they have a foundation. Plus
    > other stuff too, of course
    > but this is out of the question given that this is all over the phone.
    > Plus, in my experience these guys are prone to...having a friend help,
    > but that is
    > a different story for another time.
    > All I have for now is stuff like "what are the different kinds of
    > inheritance? What is a virtual function?
    > Why would you use a friend function?" Just trivia type questions
    > really.
    > Anyway, any advice? Obviously, I haven't given a ton of interviews in
    > my time so I would
    > appreciate some advice.
    > Thanks!


    You are a troll and you know that "entry-level C++" programmer is an
    oxymoron. There is no place for "entry-level" when the language is obsolete!
     
    dragan, Dec 1, 2009
    #3
  4. jaialai technology

    Balog Pal Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use?

    "jaialai technology" <>

    >I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    > What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)
    > This is for a beginner. Sadly, the job is in India and I will be
    > interviewing this guy
    > over the phone from the US.


    Interesting. May I ask, what is the point?
    I could imagine reasons to fetch a remote guy -- and accept the problems of
    indirect communication worsened with time zones, if he's a rare top expert I
    need much, and possibly costs fragment of locals too.

    But a beginner? I look for beginners with open mind, and without being
    spolied, so I can train them properly. That obvioisly needs being very
    close.

    If the aim is to extend the remote team, so similar mentoring is done there,
    why not just leave the selection to them?

    As for the questions, Victor's advice to go by the FAQ makes sense -- but it
    is a safe bet that a beginner will not know almost anything. Correctly and
    firmly enough.

    > Plus, in my experience these guys are prone to...having a friend help,
    > but that is
    > a different story for another time.


    BAH.

    > All I have for now is stuff like "what are the different kinds of
    > inheritance? What is a virtual function?
    > Why would you use a friend function?" Just trivia type questions
    > really.
    > Anyway, any advice? Obviously, I haven't given a ton of interviews in
    > my time so I would
    > appreciate some advice.


    Proper advice would require knowing the goals.

    Hoenstly I have some experience with using help from India -- in a way that
    sound like works at least on paper too, but the reality was sour. Without
    exceptions.
    but I guess you're not here fo advices like stay away or run like hell. ;-)
     
    Balog Pal, Dec 1, 2009
    #4
  5. jaialai technology

    Bill Davy Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use?

    "jaialai technology" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    > What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)
    > This is for a beginner. Sadly, the job is in India and I will be
    > interviewing this guy
    > over the phone from the US. So, no "write me some code that does X"
    > type questions
    > which are my favorites.
    > For a beginner I would have them start out with some simple looping,
    > pointers,
    > class definitions, etc etc just to see they have a foundation. Plus
    > other stuff too, of course
    > but this is out of the question given that this is all over the phone.
    > Plus, in my experience these guys are prone to...having a friend help,
    > but that is
    > a different story for another time.
    > All I have for now is stuff like "what are the different kinds of
    > inheritance? What is a virtual function?
    > Why would you use a friend function?" Just trivia type questions
    > really.
    > Anyway, any advice? Obviously, I haven't given a ton of interviews in
    > my time so I would
    > appreciate some advice.
    > Thanks!



    Also a bit of Turing test. Are you sure the person(s) you interview is the
    one who will be writing code for you?



    Not many people appreciate the significance of declaring a member variable
    "mutable".



    I also find one of the biggest inefficiencies of programmers is lack of
    knowledge of what has been done already (e.g. STL, Boost, etc) and how to
    find out (e.g. Google, FAQ, and newsgroups).
     
    Bill Davy, Dec 1, 2009
    #5
  6. Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use?

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    dragan wrote:

    > You are a troll and you know that "entry-level C++" programmer is an
    > oxymoron. There is no place for "entry-level" when the language is
    > obsolete!


    Which language is obsolete?!
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    iEYEARECAAYFAksU9IAACgkQG6NzcAXitM/hFwCdHDcTaBrk8P5hJtdqIsNrNbyo
    vXAAn1Qe5yCkDVwuZLYZUeGTufsnVc28
    =s4ZP
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
     
    Michael Tsang, Dec 1, 2009
    #6
  7. Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a coupleof your favorite questions I can use?

    > Hoenstly I have some experience with using help from India -- in a way
    > that sound like works at least on paper too, but the reality was sour.
    > Without exceptions.
    > but I guess you're not here fo advices like stay away or run like hell. ;-)

    Yeah, if the job market were better I would look to
    switch jobs both in protest
    and in anticipation of the ongoing nightmare this is
    going to be.
    This guy I interviewed today was actually pretty
    good though! Who knows if this is the same guy
    that will be actually working for us though.
    These offshore companies are the biggest
    bullshitters and scammers out there. I am surprised
    that this fact does not receive wider publicity.
    I'd sooner trust an email from a "nigerian finance
    minister" than one from Wipro or Patni.
    Anyway, I asked him some stuff about virtual
    functions and inheritance and then, since it was
    on his resume I asked him about multi-threaded
    programming. He answered it all just fine.
    It would be funny though if he were just the guy
    that the company brings out to interview for C++
    jobs. The dedicated interviewer
     
    jaialai technology, Dec 1, 2009
    #7
  8. jaialai technology

    dasjotre Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a coupleof your favorite questions I can use?

    On 1 Dec, 03:11, jaialai technology <>
    wrote:
    > I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    > What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)


    my favourite interview question is "how much would you like to be
    paid?". sadly it never comes up ;)
     
    dasjotre, Dec 1, 2009
    #8
  9. Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a coupleof your favorite questions I can use?

    dasjotre wrote:
    > On 1 Dec, 03:11, jaialai technology <>
    > wrote:
    >> I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    >> What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)

    >
    > my favourite interview question is "how much would you like to be
    > paid?". sadly it never comes up ;)


    Strange. About 50% of my interviews did have it, but usually coming
    from the HR person, not the technical interviewer. It's not necessarily
    phrased that way, but you'd recognise it, I'm sure of it.

    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
     
    Victor Bazarov, Dec 1, 2009
    #9
  10. jaialai technology

    James Kanze Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a coupleof your favorite questions I can use?

    On Dec 1, 5:57 pm, Victor Bazarov <> wrote:
    > dasjotre wrote:
    > > On 1 Dec, 03:11, jaialai technology
    > > <> wrote:
    > >> I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a
    > >> couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)


    > > my favourite interview question is "how much would you like
    > > to be paid?". sadly it never comes up ;)


    > Strange. About 50% of my interviews did have it, but usually
    > coming from the HR person, not the technical interviewer.
    > It's not necessarily phrased that way, but you'd recognise it,
    > I'm sure of it.


    It doesn't come up in interviews, because you don't go to an
    interview before it's been asked. Why waste your time and that
    of the company unless you're on the same wave length?

    --
    James Kanze
     
    James Kanze, Dec 1, 2009
    #10
  11. Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a coupleof your favorite questions I can use?

    James Kanze wrote:
    > On Dec 1, 5:57 pm, Victor Bazarov <> wrote:
    >> dasjotre wrote:
    >>> On 1 Dec, 03:11, jaialai technology
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>> I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a
    >>>> couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)

    >
    >>> my favourite interview question is "how much would you like
    >>> to be paid?". sadly it never comes up ;)

    >
    >> Strange. About 50% of my interviews did have it, but usually
    >> coming from the HR person, not the technical interviewer.
    >> It's not necessarily phrased that way, but you'd recognise it,
    >> I'm sure of it.

    >
    > It doesn't come up in interviews, because you don't go to an
    > interview before it's been asked. Why waste your time and that
    > of the company unless you're on the same wave length?


    James, I am not sure to whom you are replying here. When the payment
    question didn't come up in my interviews, it was either a non-negotiable
    thing (like a predetermined amount from the paygrade, for example, in a
    government-run facility), or was dependent largely on my performance,
    like in a case of "pay accord" (larger pay if finished before the given
    deadline).

    Not sure what wave length you mean.

    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
     
    Victor Bazarov, Dec 1, 2009
    #11
  12. jaialai technology

    Stefan Ram Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use?

    jaialai technology <> writes:
    >Anyway, any advice? Obviously, I haven't given a ton of interviews in
    >my time so I would


    Given

    void f( int const a, int const b )
    { ... int const r = a + b; ... }

    , how do you know whether the evaluation of »+«
    overflows or underflows? What is the value of

    -1 < 3000000000

    ? (The correct answer two the second question is:
    »The value is implementation specified«.)
     
    Stefan Ram, Dec 1, 2009
    #12
  13. jaialai technology

    Richard Guest

    [Please do not mail me a copy of your followup]

    jaialai technology <> spake the secret code
    <> thusly:

    >I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    >What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)


    Walk them over to your developer area and pair program with them for
    an hour or two. Have the applicant "drive" while you "navigate". If
    they are a good programmer, it will become obvious after about 20
    minutes. If they can "talk the talk" but can't "walk the walk" that
    will also become obvious after about 20 minutes. It also identifies
    people who program well but interview poorly and people who interview
    well but program poorly. After about half an hour of doing real code
    in front of someone, its difficult to keep up an "act" in hopes of
    getting the job. The rest of the time in the hour or two you spend
    getting to know them a little bit and find out if they are someone you
    could actually stand to have on your team (personality wise).
    --
    "The Direct3D Graphics Pipeline" -- DirectX 9 draft available for download
    <http://legalizeadulthood.wordpress.com/the-direct3d-graphics-pipeline/>

    Legalize Adulthood! <http://legalizeadulthood.wordpress.com>
     
    Richard, Dec 2, 2009
    #13
  14. jaialai technology

    Default User Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use?

    Richard wrote:

    > jaialai technology <> spake the secret
    > code
    > <>
    > thusly:
    >
    > > I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    > > What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)

    >
    > Walk them over to your developer area and pair program with them for
    > an hour or two.


    I guess you missed this:

    "Sadly, the job is in India and I will be interviewing this guy over
    the phone from the US. So, no "write me some code that does X" type
    questions which are my favorites."




    Brian
     
    Default User, Dec 2, 2009
    #14
  15. jaialai technology

    Richard Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use?

    [Please do not mail me a copy of your followup]

    "Default User" <> spake the secret code
    <> thusly:

    >Richard wrote:
    >
    >> jaialai technology <> spake the secret
    >> code
    >> <>
    >> thusly:
    >>
    >> > I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    >> > What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)

    >>
    >> Walk them over to your developer area and pair program with them for
    >> an hour or two.

    >
    >I guess you missed this:
    >
    >"Sadly, the job is in India and I will be interviewing this guy over
    >the phone from the US. So, no "write me some code that does X" type
    >questions which are my favorites."


    So use gotomeeting.com and skype and pair program remotely. They're
    coding, you're navigating. You just have to watch how they are using
    the computer on the screen.
    --
    "The Direct3D Graphics Pipeline" -- DirectX 9 draft available for download
    <http://legalizeadulthood.wordpress.com/the-direct3d-graphics-pipeline/>

    Legalize Adulthood! <http://legalizeadulthood.wordpress.com>
     
    Richard, Dec 2, 2009
    #15
  16. jaialai technology

    James Kanze Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a coupleof your favorite questions I can use?

    On Dec 1, 8:29 pm, Victor Bazarov <> wrote:
    > James Kanze wrote:
    > > On Dec 1, 5:57 pm, Victor Bazarov <> wrote:
    > >> dasjotre wrote:
    > >>> On 1 Dec, 03:11, jaialai technology
    > >>> <> wrote:
    > >>>> I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a
    > >>>> couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)


    > >>> my favourite interview question is "how much would you
    > >>> like to be paid?". sadly it never comes up ;)


    > >> Strange. About 50% of my interviews did have it, but
    > >> usually coming from the HR person, not the technical
    > >> interviewer. It's not necessarily phrased that way, but
    > >> you'd recognise it, I'm sure of it.


    > > It doesn't come up in interviews, because you don't go to an
    > > interview before it's been asked. Why waste your time and
    > > that of the company unless you're on the same wave length?


    > James, I am not sure to whom you are replying here.


    Both you and the person you responded to, partially. He said the
    question doesn't come up---you said it comes up 50% of the time.
    I say that it doesn't come up that often because you've more or
    less discussed it before the actual interview, at least enough
    to know that the position will pay enough for you to be
    interested in it.

    > When the payment question didn't come up in my interviews, it
    > was either a non-negotiable thing (like a predetermined amount
    > from the paygrade, for example, in a government-run facility),
    > or was dependent largely on my performance, like in a case of
    > "pay accord" (larger pay if finished before the given
    > deadline).


    I don't think I've ever discussed pay in the actual interview.
    Discussing it is certainly part of the total process, however.
    Before even scheduling the interview, I'll find out enough about
    the position (including pay) to know whether it could possibly
    interest me---there's no point in my going to an interview when
    what they're looking for (and ready to pay for) is a starting
    engineer fresh out of college. And unless it's something
    non-negotiable, like you describe, it will be discussed after
    the interview, if the interview was successful, but by that
    time, we're normally close enough that it's just a question of
    working out the details.

    > Not sure what wave length you mean.


    It's an English (American English?) expression: to be on the
    same wave length means that you're more or less talking about
    the same thing. If I go into an interview expecting a senior
    position, and they're looking for a starting engineer, we
    weren't on the same wave length.

    --
    James Kanze
     
    James Kanze, Dec 2, 2009
    #16
  17. jaialai technology

    James Kanze Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a coupleof your favorite questions I can use?

    On Dec 1, 11:48 pm, -berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:
    > jaialai technology <> writes:
    > >Anyway, any advice? Obviously, I haven't given a ton of
    > >interviews in my time so I would


    > Given


    > void f( int const a, int const b )
    > { ... int const r = a + b; ... }


    > , how do you know whether the evaluation of »+«
    > overflows or underflows?


    That's really more or less a trick question. The "correct"
    answer, of course, is that you can't---overflow in an arithmetic
    operation is undefined behavior. But the only people likely to
    know that are experts with the standard (which isn't necessarily
    the most important criteria for anything---unless maybe you're
    developing a compiler). Good programmer check before hand, so
    that overflow isn't possible.

    (Given the above sample, I'd ask: "why the const?" There's no
    "correct" answer, of course, but it would be interesting to see
    what the candidate thinks about it, and why.)

    > What is the value of


    > -1 < 3000000000


    > ? (The correct answer two the second question is:
    > »The value is implementation specified«.)


    As you say, it is implementation defined: it is either true, or
    a compiler error. But many compilers have historically gotten
    it wrong (not generating an error for 3000000000, even if it
    isn't representable in a signed integral type), and both C and
    the next version of C++ it will be required to be true (since C
    and the next version of C++ will require long long).

    But again, it's a trick question, since good programmers don't
    put themselves in a position where it might matter.

    --
    James Kanze
     
    James Kanze, Dec 2, 2009
    #17
  18. jaialai technology

    James Kanze Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a coupleof your favorite questions I can use?

    On Dec 2, 12:25 am, (Richard) wrote:
    > jaialai technology <> spake the
    > secret code
    > <>
    > thusly:


    > >I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow.
    > >What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use? :)


    > Walk them over to your developer area and pair program with
    > them for an hour or two.


    Pair program what? Having the candidate walk through the
    development of something with you is obviously a good idea, but
    it has to be something small enough and concrete enough for them
    to reasonably be able to make some progress in the alloted time.
    Which leads back to the original question: what question to ask.

    > Have the applicant "drive" while you "navigate". If they are
    > a good programmer, it will become obvious after about 20
    > minutes. If they can "talk the talk" but can't "walk the
    > walk" that will also become obvious after about 20 minutes.
    > It also identifies people who program well but interview
    > poorly and people who interview well but program poorly.


    You could also set the interview up as a code review session.
    But I'm a little sceptical of forcing any actual form down the
    candidates throat. Some people (myself included) don't function
    well with someone looking over their shoulder at every instant,
    and others will have no real experience in successful code
    review, even though they have the necessary underlying
    knowledge, and could learn it quickly (but not in twenty
    minutes).

    > After about half an hour of doing real code in front of
    > someone, its difficult to keep up an "act" in hopes of getting
    > the job. The rest of the time in the hour or two you spend
    > getting to know them a little bit and find out if they are
    > someone you could actually stand to have on your team
    > (personality wise).


    In some ways, you could put the "acting" into this: the fact
    that a person "acts" rather than really performs is part of his
    personality. In practice, though, I've found a few simple
    questions sufficient to weed out the bluffers. At least in my
    experience, people who know how to write CV's which are mostly
    fiction don't know anything about programming, and even simple
    questions like "why would you declare a destructor virtual?"
    will leave them struggling---or answering who knows what
    nonsense. And once you know that the CV isn't bluff, if it
    fits, what's left is the personality issues.

    --
    James Kanze
     
    James Kanze, Dec 2, 2009
    #18
  19. jaialai technology

    Balog Pal Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use?

    >"James Kanze"
    >>(Stefan Ram) wrote:


    >> What is the value of


    >> -1 < 3000000000


    >> ? (The correct answer two the second question is:
    >> »The value is implementation specified«.)


    >>As you say, it is implementation defined: it is either true, or

    >a compiler error. But many compilers have historically gotten
    >it wrong (not generating an error for 3000000000, even if it
    >isn't representable in a signed integral type), and both C and
    >the next version of C++ it will be required to be true (since C
    >and the next version of C++ will require long long).


    Hm, this made me curious for what
    -1 < 60000
    would mean wher int and long is 16 bits... Would that make 60000 unsigned?

    The '98 standard, 2.13.1p2:
    "The type of an integer literal depends on its form, value, and suffix. If
    it is decimal and has no suffix, it has the first of these types in which
    its value can be represented: int, long int; if the value cannot be
    represented as a long int, the behavior is undefined."

    Looks it is UB, and the compilers you mentioned didn't get it wrong
    standard-wise, only QoI-wise.

    Honestly I see little excuse from making it ill-formed. (Guess there is a
    ton of code around that use such literals without u suffix to init an
    unsigned type, and they left a chance to keep it work...)


    Stefan, how would you react if the guy at the interview pointed out your
    answer is wrong?
     
    Balog Pal, Dec 2, 2009
    #19
  20. jaialai technology

    Balog Pal Guest

    Re: I have to interview a C++ programmer tomorrow. What are a couple of your favorite questions I can use?

    "James Kanze" <>
    >
    >> Walk them over to your developer area and pair program with
    >> them for an hour or two.

    >
    > Pair program what? Having the candidate walk through the
    > development of something with you is obviously a good idea, but
    > it has to be something small enough and concrete enough for them
    > to reasonably be able to make some progress in the alloted time.
    > Which leads back to the original question: what question to ask.


    >> Have the applicant "drive" while you "navigate". If they are
    >> a good programmer, it will become obvious after about 20
    >> minutes. If they can "talk the talk" but can't "walk the
    >> walk" that will also become obvious after about 20 minutes.
    >> It also identifies people who program well but interview
    >> poorly and people who interview well but program poorly.

    >
    > You could also set the interview up as a code review session.


    LOL, wanted to say the same. It may be a good idea to snapshot some
    interesting cases from production for this purpose too.

    I had the idea for long but never used it in practice -- I had a good
    picture of the candidate by other means. Though if I had people who scored
    20/20 on the entry test and looked pro I'm sure it would be a good way.

    > But I'm a little sceptical of forcing any actual form down the
    > candidates throat. Some people (myself included) don't function
    > well with someone looking over their shoulder at every instant,
    > and others will have no real experience in successful code
    > review, even though they have the necessary underlying
    > knowledge, and could learn it quickly (but not in twenty
    > minutes).


    I don't get this -- what looking over the shoulder? The guy would do the
    review, and I play the part of defender.


    >
    >> After about half an hour of doing real code in front of
    >> someone, its difficult to keep up an "act" in hopes of getting
    >> the job. The rest of the time in the hour or two you spend
    >> getting to know them a little bit and find out if they are
    >> someone you could actually stand to have on your team
    >> (personality wise).

    >
    > In some ways, you could put the "acting" into this: the fact
    > that a person "acts" rather than really performs is part of his
    > personality. In practice, though, I've found a few simple
    > questions sufficient to weed out the bluffers. At least in my
    > experience, people who know how to write CV's which are mostly
    > fiction don't know anything about programming, and even simple
    > questions like "why would you declare a destructor virtual?"
    > will leave them struggling---or answering who knows what
    > nonsense. And once you know that the CV isn't bluff, if it
    > fits, what's left is the personality issues.
    >
    > --
    > James Kanze
     
    Balog Pal, Dec 2, 2009
    #20
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