Idea for a browser feature

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Christopher M., Mar 26, 2007.

  1. How about a 'sign in' button on a browser's toolbar. There are so many idiot
    webmasters out there that make it so difficult to just sign on a site--even
    sites like Amazon.com.




    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)
     
    Christopher M., Mar 26, 2007
    #1
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  2. Christopher M.

    Neredbojias Guest

    On Mon, 26 Mar 2007 00:57:43 GMT Christopher M. scribed:

    > How about a 'sign in' button on a browser's toolbar. There are so many
    > idiot webmasters out there that make it so difficult to just sign on a
    > site--even sites like Amazon.com.


    What's wrong with amazon.com? All you need is name, password, and
    (perhaps) returning-user checkbox.

    Before adding new features, the browsers, -all browser-, should be
    corrected for the multitude of errors in existing functions. The CEO of
    Mozilla came out with an open letter to this effect recently. I agree with
    him and have been saying the same for years.

    --
    Neredbojias
    He who laughs last sounds like an idiot.
     
    Neredbojias, Mar 26, 2007
    #2
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  3. "Neredbojias" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns98FEDF0BC615Ejeremiahneredbojiasc@208.49.80.251...
    >
    > Before adding new features, the browsers, -all browser-, should be
    > corrected for the multitude of errors in existing functions. The CEO of
    > Mozilla came out with an open letter to this effect recently. I agree
    > with
    > him and have been saying the same for years.


    Thanks for the info. I appreciate it.

    It's not obvious how to log in. Try it:
    http://www.amazon.com/




    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)
    "He who laughs last lacks breasts"
    --Unknown...perhaps Leonard Nimoy
     
    Christopher M., Mar 27, 2007
    #3
  4. Christopher M. wrote:
    > "Neredbojias" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns98FEDF0BC615Ejeremiahneredbojiasc@208.49.80.251...
    >> Before adding new features, the browsers, -all browser-, should be
    >> corrected for the multitude of errors in existing functions. The CEO of
    >> Mozilla came out with an open letter to this effect recently. I agree
    >> with
    >> him and have been saying the same for years.

    >
    > Thanks for the info. I appreciate it.
    >
    > It's not obvious how to log in. Try it:
    > http://www.amazon.com/
    >

    Sign In

    What is your e-mail address?
    My e-mail address is ________________________
    Do you have an Amazon.com password?
    [ ] No, I am a new customer.
    [x] Yes, I have a password:___________________

    [ Sign in using our secure server > ]

    Hmmm seems pretty clear to me...

    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
     
    Jonathan N. Little, Mar 27, 2007
    #4
  5. Christopher M.

    Ingo Schmidt Guest

    Hi!

    Well, but to actually GET there, is not that obvious. But instead of
    changing browsers, I would ask amazon to redesign their page so that
    there is actually a login box right on the very first page.

    I have always found this confusing in amazon, that you can follow some
    "my XYZ" links without having signed in yet.

    E.g. click on "Your account". These words suggest that you end up in
    some personal area to which you need to sign in.
    But no, you get a huge list of options and only after choosing one of
    them, THEN you need to log in.

    I find this very confusing and I don't like it, but I also wouldn't
    change a browser for it.


    Cheers, Ingo =;->
     
    Ingo Schmidt, Mar 27, 2007
    #5
  6. In article <46086a76$0$15957$-online.net>,
    Ingo Schmidt <> wrote:
    >
    > Well, but to actually GET there, is not that obvious. But instead of
    > changing browsers, I would ask amazon to redesign their page so that
    > there is actually a login box right on the very first page.


    Why?

    A basic principle of web UIs is not to ask the user for anything
    personally identifying until either it's needed, or until the site can
    give the user something worthwhile in return.

    If you're visiting Amazon from a personal computer, and you allow
    cookies, Amazon already has a pretty good idea of who you are (and say
    as much on practically every page), and is already offering you tidbits
    like personalization, etc., based on that ... and without requiring you
    to log in. What do you want to do more work for?

    > I have always found this confusing in amazon, that you can follow some
    > "my XYZ" links without having signed in yet.


    Like what? Recommendations or "[your name]'s Store"? Things that have no
    personally identifying information on them? Or a "My Account" link,
    which takes you to a list of links of things you can do with your
    account ... without showing any account details? Do you really want to
    have to log in to simply be shown what you can do with your account once
    you log in?

    > E.g. click on "Your account". These words suggest that you end up in
    > some personal area to which you need to sign in.
    > But no, you get a huge list of options and only after choosing one of
    > them, THEN you need to log in.


    Right, because THEN you're going to be shown personally identifying
    information that you may not want others to see. But there's no special
    privilege in seeing a list of generic links, so why make you go to
    special effort to see it? Why make you log in before you can use any
    part of the site, when the overwhelming percentage of pages on the site
    have practically nothing to do with you personally?

    Perhaps you like feeling very secure, and somehow logging in gives you
    that feeling. Nothing wrong with that (and if you want to, you _can_ log
    in to Amazon from the first page, and if the first page you're seeing
    looks like what I'm seeing, it's not hard to figure out what to do).

    But many folks don't want to have to announce who they are, simply to
    read reviews about some tool they're thinking of buying, or to see
    what's on the New York Times best-seller list, or to see what's new in
    classical music.

    I can guarantee you that if Amazon required customers to log in to see
    anything on the site ... it probably wouldn't be in business today.

    --
    Joel.
     
    Joel Shepherd, Mar 27, 2007
    #6
  7. Christopher M.

    J.O. Aho Guest

    Christopher M. wrote:
    > How about a 'sign in' button on a browser's toolbar. There are so many idiot
    > webmasters out there that make it so difficult to just sign on a site--even
    > sites like Amazon.com.


    It wouldn't be difficult to implement on SeaMonkey/FireFox, just some
    redesign of the skin,, but the bad thing is that sign in works
    differently on most sites, so you would need to have a load of those
    buttons, each custom designed for a site. It's a lot easier if you
    bookmark the sign-in page at your first visit.

    --

    //Aho
     
    J.O. Aho, Mar 27, 2007
    #7
  8. Christopher M.

    Neredbojias Guest

    On Mon, 26 Mar 2007 23:33:03 GMT Christopher M. scribed:

    > "Neredbojias" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns98FEDF0BC615Ejeremiahneredbojiasc@208.49.80.251...
    >>
    >> Before adding new features, the browsers, -all browser-, should be
    >> corrected for the multitude of errors in existing functions. The CEO of
    >> Mozilla came out with an open letter to this effect recently. I agree
    >> with
    >> him and have been saying the same for years.

    >
    > Thanks for the info. I appreciate it.
    >
    > It's not obvious how to log in. Try it:
    > http://www.amazon.com/


    Well, kinda. I see what you're saying. But...
    On the 1st page is this line:

    'Hello. Sign in to get personalized recommendations. New customer? Start
    here.'

    The "personalized recommendations" and the "Start here" are both underlined
    links which take you to a direct sign-in faculty. Instead of the former,
    they could have underlined & linked "Sign in" instead. I will add,
    however, that for the way in which I use amazon.com, signing-in has never
    given me pause.

    --
    Neredbojias
    He who laughs last sounds like an idiot.
     
    Neredbojias, Mar 27, 2007
    #8
  9. Christopher M.

    freemont Guest

    On Mon, 26 Mar 2007 00:57:43 +0000, Christopher M. writ:

    > How about a 'sign in' button on a browser's toolbar. There are so many idiot
    > webmasters out there that make it so difficult to just sign on a site--even
    > sites like Amazon.com.


    You mean like Opera's "Wand"?

    http://www.opera.com/products/desktop/wand/

    Very handy.

    --
    "Because all you of Earth are idiots!"
    ¯`·..·¯`·-> freemont© <-·¯`·..·¯
     
    freemont, Mar 27, 2007
    #9
  10. "Joel Shepherd" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <46086a76$0$15957$-online.net>,
    > Ingo Schmidt <> wrote:
    >>
    >> Well, but to actually GET there, is not that obvious. But instead of
    >> changing browsers, I would ask amazon to redesign their page so that
    >> there is actually a login box right on the very first page.

    >
    > Why?


    I think some people actually want to sign in to Amazon--maybe to see
    personalized recommendations or something.

    Oh, I see that Amazon has updated their page. The 'personalized
    recommendations' link now lets you sign in. For a while it was really messed
    up--you had to click on a tab, and then a link or something. It was really
    ridiculous.

    There is also a problem with Firefox (version 2.0.0.2) and Netflix. I type
    in 'www.netflix.com' and I'm taken to the 'Register' page
    (www.netflix.com/register). There's an input box for an email address--but
    it's for new customers only. Members have to click the much less significant
    'Member sign in' link at the top.
    http://www.netflix.com



    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)
     
    Christopher M., Mar 28, 2007
    #10
  11. Gazing into my crystal ball I observed "freemont"
    <> writing in
    news:a0f94$460904dd$471cae63$:

    > On Mon, 26 Mar 2007 00:57:43 +0000, Christopher M. writ:
    >
    >> How about a 'sign in' button on a browser's toolbar. There are so
    >> many idiot webmasters out there that make it so difficult to just
    >> sign on a site--even sites like Amazon.com.

    >
    > You mean like Opera's "Wand"?
    >
    > http://www.opera.com/products/desktop/wand/
    >
    > Very handy.
    >


    I love that - I think it's one of the best things about that browser.
    It's especially annoying to have to use someone else's computer and have
    to take the time to type in a username and password. Eventually, I get
    tired of it, tell the person to download Opera, and once they've
    installed it they're thrilled not only with that feature, but mouse
    gestures, and all the other neat things Opera does.

    --
    Adrienne Boswell at Home
    Arbpen Web Site Design Services
    http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    Please respond to the group so others can share
     
    Adrienne Boswell, Mar 30, 2007
    #11
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