IIS logs, time taken, substatus and ASP.Net

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Mark, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Hi...

    I've been doing some log analysis from one of our websites and I'm seeing
    some peculiar things.

    Specifically, I'm seeing that the time-taken column for some requests is
    running into multiple minutes, sometimes as high as 20 minutes - obviously
    far outside the limit of the ASP.Net timeout limit.

    My presumptions on why/how this is happening boil down to bad network
    connections to the client - lots of packet resends. ASP.Net hands off the
    bytes to IIS for transmission but who knows how long that will take? Either
    a patchy network or a patchy client or an intentional tweaking by someone
    malicious could drag it out a long time ("Eh? What's that? Couldn't hear
    what you said.")

    If I'm anywhere in the ball park, it leads to a few questions:
    1) Is there any setting to govern how long IIS will try to send the bytes?
    A number of the requests in the log have substatii of 64, 121, or 1236 (all
    network errors) but a bunch of the really long ones were eventually
    successful. I'd just rather not take a half hour to get there.

    2) Once ASP.Net hands the bytes to the transport layer, does the request
    stay active in the ASP.Net queue until it hears the request is done? That
    might also explain some instances where I see requests (even small ones) that
    have sat on the queue 4+ seconds before even getting to start.

    3) We're using IIS 6 with the Blowery compression module... Does adding a
    custom module in on the back end complicate the transmission section of
    delivery?

    Thanks
    Mark
     
    Mark, Jul 1, 2010
    #1
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  2. Hi Mark,

    >Specifically, I'm seeing that the time-taken column for some requests is
    >running into multiple minutes, sometimes as high as 20 minutes - obviously
    >far outside the limit of the ASP.Net timeout limit.


    Does it happen for a particular site? Are you sure the executionTimeout
    (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/e1f13641.aspx) setting of that
    site is less than 20 mins and that site is an ASP.NET web site?

    Regards,
    Allen Chen
    Microsoft Online Support

    Delighting our customers is our #1 priority. We welcome your comments and
    suggestions about how we can improve the support we provide to you. Please
    feel free to let my manager know what you think of the level of service
    provided. You can send feedback directly to my manager at:
    .

    ==================================================
    Get notification to my posts through email? Please refer to
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/aa948868.aspx#notifications.

    Note: MSDN Managed Newsgroup support offering is for non-urgent issues
    where an initial response from the community or a Microsoft Support
    Engineer within 2 business day is acceptable. Please note that each follow
    up response may take approximately 2 business days as the support
    professional working with you may need further investigation to reach the
    most efficient resolution. The offering is not appropriate for situations
    that require urgent, real-time or phone-based interactions. Issues of this
    nature are best handled working with a dedicated Microsoft Support Engineer
    by contacting Microsoft Customer Support Services (CSS) at
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/aa948874.aspx
    ==================================================
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
     
    Allen Chen [MSFT], Jul 15, 2010
    #2
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  3. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Hi Allen...

    I've seen these outliers (about .5% of the requests in a log) in a
    semi-random sampling of the IIS logs from our 60 web servers. We white-label
    for a bunch of our customers, so we have different web pages being served
    from different domain hosts on a lot of our servers, but there always seem to
    be some of these ridiculously long outliers.

    We never change executionTimeout at the ASP.Net level, which is what got me
    hypothesizing about what happens to the bytes *after* ASP.Net does a
    Response.Write and washes its hands of it.

    I could envision scenarios where the rest of the IIS infrastructure is then
    faced with trying to shove the bytes down a leaky, unreliable pipeline with
    lots of naks or lost packets, leading to incredibly long service times.

    My question is there any way to control how long the rest of IIS tries to
    battle through the network crap? It's a waste of a socket to spend 20
    minutes trying to spoon-feed a single client.

    Thanks
    Mark


    "Allen Chen [MSFT]" wrote:

    > Hi Mark,
    >
    > >Specifically, I'm seeing that the time-taken column for some requests is
    > >running into multiple minutes, sometimes as high as 20 minutes - obviously
    > >far outside the limit of the ASP.Net timeout limit.

    >
    > Does it happen for a particular site? Are you sure the executionTimeout
    > (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/e1f13641.aspx) setting of that
    > site is less than 20 mins and that site is an ASP.NET web site?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Allen Chen
    > Microsoft Online Support
    >
    > Delighting our customers is our #1 priority. We welcome your comments and
    > suggestions about how we can improve the support we provide to you. Please
    > feel free to let my manager know what you think of the level of service
    > provided. You can send feedback directly to my manager at:
    > .
    >
    > ==================================================
    > Get notification to my posts through email? Please refer to
    > http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/aa948868.aspx#notifications.
    >
    > Note: MSDN Managed Newsgroup support offering is for non-urgent issues
    > where an initial response from the community or a Microsoft Support
    > Engineer within 2 business day is acceptable. Please note that each follow
    > up response may take approximately 2 business days as the support
    > professional working with you may need further investigation to reach the
    > most efficient resolution. The offering is not appropriate for situations
    > that require urgent, real-time or phone-based interactions. Issues of this
    > nature are best handled working with a dedicated Microsoft Support Engineer
    > by contacting Microsoft Customer Support Services (CSS) at
    > http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/aa948874.aspx
    > ==================================================
    > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    >
    > .
    >
     
    Mark, Jul 15, 2010
    #3
  4. Hi Mark,

    >My question is there any way to control how long the rest of IIS tries to
    >battle through the network crap? It's a waste of a socket to spend 20
    >minutes trying to spoon-feed a single client.


    Could you try to enable connection timeout of IIS to see whether it works?

    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/3
    1a2f39c-4d59-4cba-905c-60e7af657e49.mspx?mfr=true

    Regards,
    Allen Chen
    Microsoft Online Support

    Delighting our customers is our #1 priority. We welcome your comments and
    suggestions about how we can improve the support we provide to you. Please
    feel free to let my manager know what you think of the level of service
    provided. You can send feedback directly to my manager at:
    .
     
    Allen Chen [MSFT], Jul 16, 2010
    #4
  5. Hi,


    >My question is there any way to control how long the rest of IIS tries to
    >battle through the network crap? It's a waste of a socket to spend 20
    >minutes trying to spoon-feed a single client.


    Have you resolved this issue?

    Regards,
    Allen Chen
    Microsoft Online Support

    Delighting our customers is our #1 priority. We welcome your comments and
    suggestions about how we can improve the support we provide to you. Please
    feel free to let my manager know what you think of the level of service
    provided. You can send feedback directly to my manager at:
    .
     
    Allen Chen [MSFT], Jul 21, 2010
    #5
  6. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Hi Allen...

    I still had some questions in my last reply; if you had answers for those,
    it would be
    great.

    Thanks
    Mark

    "Allen Chen [MSFT]" wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    >
    > >My question is there any way to control how long the rest of IIS tries to
    > >battle through the network crap? It's a waste of a socket to spend 20
    > >minutes trying to spoon-feed a single client.

    >
    > Have you resolved this issue?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Allen Chen
    > Microsoft Online Support
    >
    > Delighting our customers is our #1 priority. We welcome your comments and
    > suggestions about how we can improve the support we provide to you. Please
    > feel free to let my manager know what you think of the level of service
    > provided. You can send feedback directly to my manager at:
    > .
    >
    > .
    >
     
    Mark, Jul 21, 2010
    #6
  7. Hi,

    >My question is there any way to control how long the rest of IIS tries to
    >battle through the network crap? It's a waste of a socket to spend 20
    >minutes trying to spoon-feed a single client.


    >Thanks
    >Mark


    Is connection timeout of IIS help on this?

    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/3
    1a2f39c-4d59-4cba-905c-60e7af657e49.mspx?mfr=true

    Regards,
    Allen Chen
    Microsoft Online Support

    Delighting our customers is our #1 priority. We welcome your comments and
    suggestions about how we can improve the support we provide to you. Please
    feel free to let my manager know what you think of the level of service
    provided. You can send feedback directly to my manager at:
    .
     
    Allen Chen [MSFT], Jul 22, 2010
    #7
  8. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Hi Allen...

    Yes, this article was very helpful, but in my 7/16 response, I had some
    specific questions about how MinFileBytesPerSec is applied.

    240 bytes/sec
    a) still lets large files take many hours to download; it even lets today's
    average html page (~50k) take longer than you might want.
    and
    b) is much more granular than the network. Packet sizes are much bigger
    than 240 bytes.

    So my questions were:

    But tcp packet sizes are much bigger than 240 bytes (say in the 10k range)
    and between packet shipment and ack/nack there is an arbitrary amount of
    time. So if a packet is 10k that's 42x 240. Does IIS send off a packet and
    wait 42 seconds for the ack?

    And say your connection is being used for HTTP/1.1, so the actual socket
    connection is expected to be reused for multiple requests. Presumably
    MinFileBytesPerSec is only applied on a request by request basis, correct?
    I.e. if one request fails the MinFileBytesPerSec, IIS just stops serving that
    request; it doesn't chop the connection?

    Thanks
    Mark


    "Allen Chen [MSFT]" wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > >My question is there any way to control how long the rest of IIS tries to
    > >battle through the network crap? It's a waste of a socket to spend 20
    > >minutes trying to spoon-feed a single client.

    >
    > >Thanks
    > >Mark

    >
    > Is connection timeout of IIS help on this?
    >
    > http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/3
    > 1a2f39c-4d59-4cba-905c-60e7af657e49.mspx?mfr=true
    >
    > Regards,
    > Allen Chen
    > Microsoft Online Support
    >
    > Delighting our customers is our #1 priority. We welcome your comments and
    > suggestions about how we can improve the support we provide to you. Please
    > feel free to let my manager know what you think of the level of service
    > provided. You can send feedback directly to my manager at:
    > .
    >
    > .
    >
     
    Mark, Jul 22, 2010
    #8
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