In a timeline pinch (Suspense: 25Jul05) pleading for assistance - Q1

Discussion in 'C++' started by Daniel Antonson, Jul 6, 2005.

  1. Fellow programmers,

    As one of you pointed out, I've been taking 3 online courses (2 are done)
    and have run into a time crunch. I started these courses in Oct04, but
    between work (US Army in DC), caring for my wife (stroke in Dec03 due to
    lupus complications) & daughter (4), and preparing for transfer/deployment
    (my stepson,- 23, says he'll care for them during my absence). I've had
    little time for anything else.

    I would greatly appreciate your assistance. Granted, it isn't the proper
    approach, but the time
    remaining demands urgent solutions.

    very respectfully,
    Daniel

    1. Which of the following usually indicates that there is no more input to
    be read by a program?

    a. '\n'
    b. '\0'
    c. END
    d. EOF


    2. What is the effect of the following code?
    char Ch;
    Ch = '7';
    printf("%d\n", Ch);

    a. It will cause an error
    b. It will print out the computer's internal code for the character '7'
    c. It will print out the character '7'
    d. It will print out the character whose internal code is 7


    3. What is the effect of the following code?
    char Ch;
    while ((Ch=getchar() ) != ';')
    putchar (Ch);

    a. It will read and write characters until something other than a ; is read.
    b. It will read characters up to and including the first semicolon, and
    write characters up to but not including the first semicolon.
    c. It will read and write characters up to but not including the first
    semicolon.
    d. It will skip characters up to the first semicolon, then write the next
    character.


    4. It is necessary to use an int instead of a char for processing a
    character:

    a. whenever a computation is performed on the character.
    b. whenever a test for EOF is made.
    c. whenever the character is passed as a parameter to a function.
    d. It is never necessary to use an int for character processing.


    5. What characters are output by the following code:

    char Ch='/';
    while (Ch != 'd')
    {
    putchar(Ch);
    Ch = getchar();
    }

    given the following input? abcdefghi

    a. abc
    b. d
    c. /abc
    d. /efghi


    6. What is the effect of the following code?

    char Ch;
    while ((Ch = getchar()) != '\n')
    putchar(' ');

    a. It reads and writes exactly one line with a blank after each character.
    b. It reads one line but outputs only blanks.
    c. It reads a line and then outputs one blank.
    d. It reads and writes one line with all blanks replaced by newlines.


    7. In general, when an int is combined with a long in an expression, the
    result is:

    a. int
    b. long
    c. double
    d. A syntax error


    8. Given the following declarations:

    int N;
    char C;
    float X;

    what is the type of the expression C+N*X?

    a. char
    b. int
    c. float
    d. The expression contains a syntax error


    9. Given the following declarations and initialization:

    int i = 1;
    int x = 2.0;

    What is the value and type of the expression i/x?

    a. .5 double
    b. .5 int
    c. 0.0 float
    d. 0 int


    10. Given the following declarations and initializations:

    int n = 8;
    int z = 2.0;

    What is the value and type of the expression z=n?

    a. 8 int
    b. 8 float
    c. 8 double
    d. 8 unsigned


    11. Which of the following statements is true?
    a. int expressions are always computed exactly; but float expressions can
    suffer round-off error
    b. float expressions are always computed exactly; but int expressions can
    suffer round-off error
    c. Both int and float expressions can suffer round-off error
    d. Both int and float expressions will always be computed exactly


    12. Given the following declarations:

    int N;
    float X;

    what is the type of the expression X%N?

    a. int
    b. float
    c. double
    d. can't use float with %


    13. Choose the C statement which defines an enumeration type fuzzy
    consisting of values false, maybe, and true. Defined so that maybe is
    greater in value than false but less than true.

    a. enum fuzzy {false, maybe, true};
    b. enum fuzzy {true, false, maybe};
    c. enum fuzzy {false, maybe, true}
    d. enum fuzzy {true, maybe, false};


    14. Given the type definition below:

    enum color {red, yellow, green, blue};

    what is the value of the expression (int) blue?

    a. 2
    b. 3
    c. 4
    d. blue


    15. Which of the following statements allocates space for a variable of the
    defined enum type?

    a. enum color {red, yellow, blue} paint;
    b. enum color {red, yellow, blue};
    c. enum {red, yellow, blue} paint;
    d. a and c


    Answer questions 16 and 17 given the following values for the int variables
    X and Y

    X=1100110000110011
    Y=0000111100001010


    16. What is the binary representation of X<<5?

    a. 1000011001100000
    b. 1000011001111111
    c. 0000110011000000
    d. 0000110011111111


    17. What is the two's complement of -Y (negative Y)?

    a. 0000111100001010
    b. 1111000011110101
    c. 1111000011110110
    d. 1100000000110001


    18. If X is an int variable, what do we know about the value of X&X?

    a. It is always equal to X.
    b. It is always greater than 1.
    c. It is always equal to zero.
    d. It is always equal to 1.


    19. A pointer variable contains:

    a. an integer.
    b. the address of another variable.
    c. any data type.
    d. a character string.


    20. The term "dereferencing" means:

    a. taking the address of another variable.
    b. deleting a variable.
    c. retrieving the value of a variable given its address.
    d. making an assignment to a pointer variable.


    21. Which of the statements below is true of the following declaration:

    int n=5, *p=&n;

    a. p is a pointer initialized to point to n.
    b. p is a pointer initialized to the value 5.
    c. n and p are both pointer variables.
    d. The declaration contains a syntax error


    22. Call-by-reference is:

    a. not available in C.
    b. accomplished by declaring a formal parameter to be a pointer.
    c. accomplished be using a de-referenced pointer as a parameter.
    d. accomplished by putting an ampersand (&) in the formal parameter.


    23. If you want a variable declared inside a function to retain its previous
    value when the block is re-entered, what type of storage class should you
    use?

    a. auto
    b. static
    c. register
    d. extern


    24. The address operator & cannot be applied to which of the following?

    a. constants
    b. expressions
    c. variables of class register
    d. All of the above


    25. Write the output produced by the following code:

    int x=5, y=6, *p=&x, *q=&y;
    x=*q;
    *p = *q + 2;
    *q=x;
    printf("%d %d %d %d\n", x, y, *p, *q);

    a. 8 8 8 8
    b. 5 6 5 6
    c. 6 8 5 6
    d. 6 8 6 8


    "Daniel Antonson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What is the effect of the following code?
    >
    > char Ch;
    >
    > while ((Ch=getchar() ) != ';')
    >
    > putchar (Ch);
    >
    > a. It will read and write characters until something other than a ; is
    > read.
    >
    > b. It will read characters up to and including the first semicolon,
    >
    > and write characters up to but not including the first semicolon.
    >
    > c. It will read and write characters up to but not including the first
    > semicolon.
    >
    > d. It will skip characters up to the first semicolon, then write the
    >
    > next character.
    >
    >
    Daniel Antonson, Jul 6, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Daniel Antonson

    John Smith Guest

    Daniel:

    Just off the top of my head, without checking any of my answers, here
    is what I have to offer (the ????? means I DEFINENTLY do not
    know--double check the answers I did give against others,some of those
    questions are a bit tricky--hope this helps):
    1) d.
    2) b.
    3) a.
    4) d.
    5) c.
    6) b.
    7) b.
    8) c.
    9) d.
    10) a.
    11) a.
    12) ????????????????
    13) a.
    14) b.
    15) b.
    16) a.
    17) ????????????
    18) a.
    19) b.
    20) c.
    21) a.
    22) ??????????
    23) b.
    24) d.
    25) b.

    John

    "Daniel Antonson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Fellow programmers,
    >
    > As one of you pointed out, I've been taking 3 online courses (2 are
    > done)
    > and have run into a time crunch. I started these courses in Oct04,
    > but
    > between work (US Army in DC), caring for my wife (stroke in Dec03
    > due to
    > lupus complications) & daughter (4), and preparing for
    > transfer/deployment
    > (my stepson,- 23, says he'll care for them during my absence). I've
    > had
    > little time for anything else.
    >
    > I would greatly appreciate your assistance. Granted, it isn't the
    > proper
    > approach, but the time
    > remaining demands urgent solutions.
    >
    > very respectfully,
    > Daniel
    >
    > 1. Which of the following usually indicates that there is no more
    > input to
    > be read by a program?
    >
    > a. '\n'
    > b. '\0'
    > c. END
    > d. EOF
    >
    >
    > 2. What is the effect of the following code?
    > char Ch;
    > Ch = '7';
    > printf("%d\n", Ch);
    >
    > a. It will cause an error
    > b. It will print out the computer's internal code for the character
    > '7'
    > c. It will print out the character '7'
    > d. It will print out the character whose internal code is 7
    >
    >
    > 3. What is the effect of the following code?
    > char Ch;
    > while ((Ch=getchar() ) != ';')
    > putchar (Ch);
    >
    > a. It will read and write characters until something other than a ;
    > is read.
    > b. It will read characters up to and including the first semicolon,
    > and
    > write characters up to but not including the first semicolon.
    > c. It will read and write characters up to but not including the
    > first
    > semicolon.
    > d. It will skip characters up to the first semicolon, then write the
    > next
    > character.
    >
    >
    > 4. It is necessary to use an int instead of a char for processing a
    > character:
    >
    > a. whenever a computation is performed on the character.
    > b. whenever a test for EOF is made.
    > c. whenever the character is passed as a parameter to a function.
    > d. It is never necessary to use an int for character processing.
    >
    >
    > 5. What characters are output by the following code:
    >
    > char Ch='/';
    > while (Ch != 'd')
    > {
    > putchar(Ch);
    > Ch = getchar();
    > }
    >
    > given the following input? abcdefghi
    >
    > a. abc
    > b. d
    > c. /abc
    > d. /efghi
    >
    >
    > 6. What is the effect of the following code?
    >
    > char Ch;
    > while ((Ch = getchar()) != '\n')
    > putchar(' ');
    >
    > a. It reads and writes exactly one line with a blank after each
    > character.
    > b. It reads one line but outputs only blanks.
    > c. It reads a line and then outputs one blank.
    > d. It reads and writes one line with all blanks replaced by
    > newlines.
    >
    >
    > 7. In general, when an int is combined with a long in an expression,
    > the
    > result is:
    >
    > a. int
    > b. long
    > c. double
    > d. A syntax error
    >
    >
    > 8. Given the following declarations:
    >
    > int N;
    > char C;
    > float X;
    >
    > what is the type of the expression C+N*X?
    >
    > a. char
    > b. int
    > c. float
    > d. The expression contains a syntax error
    >
    >
    > 9. Given the following declarations and initialization:
    >
    > int i = 1;
    > int x = 2.0;
    >
    > What is the value and type of the expression i/x?
    >
    > a. .5 double
    > b. .5 int
    > c. 0.0 float
    > d. 0 int
    >
    >
    > 10. Given the following declarations and initializations:
    >
    > int n = 8;
    > int z = 2.0;
    >
    > What is the value and type of the expression z=n?
    >
    > a. 8 int
    > b. 8 float
    > c. 8 double
    > d. 8 unsigned
    >
    >
    > 11. Which of the following statements is true?
    > a. int expressions are always computed exactly; but float
    > expressions can
    > suffer round-off error
    > b. float expressions are always computed exactly; but int
    > expressions can
    > suffer round-off error
    > c. Both int and float expressions can suffer round-off error
    > d. Both int and float expressions will always be computed exactly
    >
    >
    > 12. Given the following declarations:
    >
    > int N;
    > float X;
    >
    > what is the type of the expression X%N?
    >
    > a. int
    > b. float
    > c. double
    > d. can't use float with %
    >
    >
    > 13. Choose the C statement which defines an enumeration type fuzzy
    > consisting of values false, maybe, and true. Defined so that maybe
    > is
    > greater in value than false but less than true.
    >
    > a. enum fuzzy {false, maybe, true};
    > b. enum fuzzy {true, false, maybe};
    > c. enum fuzzy {false, maybe, true}
    > d. enum fuzzy {true, maybe, false};
    >
    >
    > 14. Given the type definition below:
    >
    > enum color {red, yellow, green, blue};
    >
    > what is the value of the expression (int) blue?
    >
    > a. 2
    > b. 3
    > c. 4
    > d. blue
    >
    >
    > 15. Which of the following statements allocates space for a variable
    > of the
    > defined enum type?
    >
    > a. enum color {red, yellow, blue} paint;
    > b. enum color {red, yellow, blue};
    > c. enum {red, yellow, blue} paint;
    > d. a and c
    >
    >
    > Answer questions 16 and 17 given the following values for the int
    > variables
    > X and Y
    >
    > X=1100110000110011
    > Y=0000111100001010
    >
    >
    > 16. What is the binary representation of X<<5?
    >
    > a. 1000011001100000
    > b. 1000011001111111
    > c. 0000110011000000
    > d. 0000110011111111
    >
    >
    > 17. What is the two's complement of -Y (negative Y)?
    >
    > a. 0000111100001010
    > b. 1111000011110101
    > c. 1111000011110110
    > d. 1100000000110001
    >
    >
    > 18. If X is an int variable, what do we know about the value of X&X?
    >
    > a. It is always equal to X.
    > b. It is always greater than 1.
    > c. It is always equal to zero.
    > d. It is always equal to 1.
    >
    >
    > 19. A pointer variable contains:
    >
    > a. an integer.
    > b. the address of another variable.
    > c. any data type.
    > d. a character string.
    >
    >
    > 20. The term "dereferencing" means:
    >
    > a. taking the address of another variable.
    > b. deleting a variable.
    > c. retrieving the value of a variable given its address.
    > d. making an assignment to a pointer variable.
    >
    >
    > 21. Which of the statements below is true of the following
    > declaration:
    >
    > int n=5, *p=&n;
    >
    > a. p is a pointer initialized to point to n.
    > b. p is a pointer initialized to the value 5.
    > c. n and p are both pointer variables.
    > d. The declaration contains a syntax error
    >
    >
    > 22. Call-by-reference is:
    >
    > a. not available in C.
    > b. accomplished by declaring a formal parameter to be a pointer.
    > c. accomplished be using a de-referenced pointer as a parameter.
    > d. accomplished by putting an ampersand (&) in the formal parameter.
    >
    >
    > 23. If you want a variable declared inside a function to retain its
    > previous
    > value when the block is re-entered, what type of storage class
    > should you
    > use?
    >
    > a. auto
    > b. static
    > c. register
    > d. extern
    >
    >
    > 24. The address operator & cannot be applied to which of the
    > following?
    >
    > a. constants
    > b. expressions
    > c. variables of class register
    > d. All of the above
    >
    >
    > 25. Write the output produced by the following code:
    >
    > int x=5, y=6, *p=&x, *q=&y;
    > x=*q;
    > *p = *q + 2;
    > *q=x;
    > printf("%d %d %d %d\n", x, y, *p, *q);
    >
    > a. 8 8 8 8
    > b. 5 6 5 6
    > c. 6 8 5 6
    > d. 6 8 6 8
    >
    >
    > "Daniel Antonson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> What is the effect of the following code?
    >>
    >> char Ch;
    >>
    >> while ((Ch=getchar() ) != ';')
    >>
    >> putchar (Ch);
    >>
    >> a. It will read and write characters until something other than a ;
    >> is
    >> read.
    >>
    >> b. It will read characters up to and including the first semicolon,
    >>
    >> and write characters up to but not including the first semicolon.
    >>
    >> c. It will read and write characters up to but not including the
    >> first
    >> semicolon.
    >>
    >> d. It will skip characters up to the first semicolon, then write
    >> the
    >>
    >> next character.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >
    John Smith, Jul 6, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Daniel Antonson

    Howard Guest

    "Daniel Antonson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Fellow programmers,
    >
    > As one of you pointed out, I've been taking 3 online courses (2 are done)
    > and have run into a time crunch. I started these courses in Oct04, but
    > between work (US Army in DC), caring for my wife (stroke in Dec03 due to
    > lupus complications) & daughter (4), and preparing for transfer/deployment
    > (my stepson,- 23, says he'll care for them during my absence). I've had
    > little time for anything else.
    >
    > I would greatly appreciate your assistance. Granted, it isn't the proper
    > approach, but the time
    > remaining demands urgent solutions.
    >
    > very respectfully,
    > Daniel
    >


    Yeah, I'd agree. This isn't the proper approach.

    No amount of hardship justifies us simply giving you the answers to your
    homework. Plus, it won't help you, and it won't help anyone else, if you
    pass a course simply by having the answers fed to you.

    Please, folks, don't give him the answers!

    -Howard
    Howard, Jul 6, 2005
    #3
  4. Daniel Antonson

    John Smith Guest

    Daniel:

    After thinking about it a bit, my best guesses on the questions I
    didn't answer at first are:
    12) d.
    17) b.
    22) b.

    John

    "Daniel Antonson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Fellow programmers,
    >
    > As one of you pointed out, I've been taking 3 online courses (2 are
    > done)
    > and have run into a time crunch. I started these courses in Oct04,
    > but
    > between work (US Army in DC), caring for my wife (stroke in Dec03
    > due to
    > lupus complications) & daughter (4), and preparing for
    > transfer/deployment
    > (my stepson,- 23, says he'll care for them during my absence). I've
    > had
    > little time for anything else.
    >
    > I would greatly appreciate your assistance. Granted, it isn't the
    > proper
    > approach, but the time
    > remaining demands urgent solutions.
    >
    > very respectfully,
    > Daniel
    >
    > 1. Which of the following usually indicates that there is no more
    > input to
    > be read by a program?
    >
    > a. '\n'
    > b. '\0'
    > c. END
    > d. EOF
    >
    >
    > 2. What is the effect of the following code?
    > char Ch;
    > Ch = '7';
    > printf("%d\n", Ch);
    >
    > a. It will cause an error
    > b. It will print out the computer's internal code for the character
    > '7'
    > c. It will print out the character '7'
    > d. It will print out the character whose internal code is 7
    >
    >
    > 3. What is the effect of the following code?
    > char Ch;
    > while ((Ch=getchar() ) != ';')
    > putchar (Ch);
    >
    > a. It will read and write characters until something other than a ;
    > is read.
    > b. It will read characters up to and including the first semicolon,
    > and
    > write characters up to but not including the first semicolon.
    > c. It will read and write characters up to but not including the
    > first
    > semicolon.
    > d. It will skip characters up to the first semicolon, then write the
    > next
    > character.
    >
    >
    > 4. It is necessary to use an int instead of a char for processing a
    > character:
    >
    > a. whenever a computation is performed on the character.
    > b. whenever a test for EOF is made.
    > c. whenever the character is passed as a parameter to a function.
    > d. It is never necessary to use an int for character processing.
    >
    >
    > 5. What characters are output by the following code:
    >
    > char Ch='/';
    > while (Ch != 'd')
    > {
    > putchar(Ch);
    > Ch = getchar();
    > }
    >
    > given the following input? abcdefghi
    >
    > a. abc
    > b. d
    > c. /abc
    > d. /efghi
    >
    >
    > 6. What is the effect of the following code?
    >
    > char Ch;
    > while ((Ch = getchar()) != '\n')
    > putchar(' ');
    >
    > a. It reads and writes exactly one line with a blank after each
    > character.
    > b. It reads one line but outputs only blanks.
    > c. It reads a line and then outputs one blank.
    > d. It reads and writes one line with all blanks replaced by
    > newlines.
    >
    >
    > 7. In general, when an int is combined with a long in an expression,
    > the
    > result is:
    >
    > a. int
    > b. long
    > c. double
    > d. A syntax error
    >
    >
    > 8. Given the following declarations:
    >
    > int N;
    > char C;
    > float X;
    >
    > what is the type of the expression C+N*X?
    >
    > a. char
    > b. int
    > c. float
    > d. The expression contains a syntax error
    >
    >
    > 9. Given the following declarations and initialization:
    >
    > int i = 1;
    > int x = 2.0;
    >
    > What is the value and type of the expression i/x?
    >
    > a. .5 double
    > b. .5 int
    > c. 0.0 float
    > d. 0 int
    >
    >
    > 10. Given the following declarations and initializations:
    >
    > int n = 8;
    > int z = 2.0;
    >
    > What is the value and type of the expression z=n?
    >
    > a. 8 int
    > b. 8 float
    > c. 8 double
    > d. 8 unsigned
    >
    >
    > 11. Which of the following statements is true?
    > a. int expressions are always computed exactly; but float
    > expressions can
    > suffer round-off error
    > b. float expressions are always computed exactly; but int
    > expressions can
    > suffer round-off error
    > c. Both int and float expressions can suffer round-off error
    > d. Both int and float expressions will always be computed exactly
    >
    >
    > 12. Given the following declarations:
    >
    > int N;
    > float X;
    >
    > what is the type of the expression X%N?
    >
    > a. int
    > b. float
    > c. double
    > d. can't use float with %
    >
    >
    > 13. Choose the C statement which defines an enumeration type fuzzy
    > consisting of values false, maybe, and true. Defined so that maybe
    > is
    > greater in value than false but less than true.
    >
    > a. enum fuzzy {false, maybe, true};
    > b. enum fuzzy {true, false, maybe};
    > c. enum fuzzy {false, maybe, true}
    > d. enum fuzzy {true, maybe, false};
    >
    >
    > 14. Given the type definition below:
    >
    > enum color {red, yellow, green, blue};
    >
    > what is the value of the expression (int) blue?
    >
    > a. 2
    > b. 3
    > c. 4
    > d. blue
    >
    >
    > 15. Which of the following statements allocates space for a variable
    > of the
    > defined enum type?
    >
    > a. enum color {red, yellow, blue} paint;
    > b. enum color {red, yellow, blue};
    > c. enum {red, yellow, blue} paint;
    > d. a and c
    >
    >
    > Answer questions 16 and 17 given the following values for the int
    > variables
    > X and Y
    >
    > X=1100110000110011
    > Y=0000111100001010
    >
    >
    > 16. What is the binary representation of X<<5?
    >
    > a. 1000011001100000
    > b. 1000011001111111
    > c. 0000110011000000
    > d. 0000110011111111
    >
    >
    > 17. What is the two's complement of -Y (negative Y)?
    >
    > a. 0000111100001010
    > b. 1111000011110101
    > c. 1111000011110110
    > d. 1100000000110001
    >
    >
    > 18. If X is an int variable, what do we know about the value of X&X?
    >
    > a. It is always equal to X.
    > b. It is always greater than 1.
    > c. It is always equal to zero.
    > d. It is always equal to 1.
    >
    >
    > 19. A pointer variable contains:
    >
    > a. an integer.
    > b. the address of another variable.
    > c. any data type.
    > d. a character string.
    >
    >
    > 20. The term "dereferencing" means:
    >
    > a. taking the address of another variable.
    > b. deleting a variable.
    > c. retrieving the value of a variable given its address.
    > d. making an assignment to a pointer variable.
    >
    >
    > 21. Which of the statements below is true of the following
    > declaration:
    >
    > int n=5, *p=&n;
    >
    > a. p is a pointer initialized to point to n.
    > b. p is a pointer initialized to the value 5.
    > c. n and p are both pointer variables.
    > d. The declaration contains a syntax error
    >
    >
    > 22. Call-by-reference is:
    >
    > a. not available in C.
    > b. accomplished by declaring a formal parameter to be a pointer.
    > c. accomplished be using a de-referenced pointer as a parameter.
    > d. accomplished by putting an ampersand (&) in the formal parameter.
    >
    >
    > 23. If you want a variable declared inside a function to retain its
    > previous
    > value when the block is re-entered, what type of storage class
    > should you
    > use?
    >
    > a. auto
    > b. static
    > c. register
    > d. extern
    >
    >
    > 24. The address operator & cannot be applied to which of the
    > following?
    >
    > a. constants
    > b. expressions
    > c. variables of class register
    > d. All of the above
    >
    >
    > 25. Write the output produced by the following code:
    >
    > int x=5, y=6, *p=&x, *q=&y;
    > x=*q;
    > *p = *q + 2;
    > *q=x;
    > printf("%d %d %d %d\n", x, y, *p, *q);
    >
    > a. 8 8 8 8
    > b. 5 6 5 6
    > c. 6 8 5 6
    > d. 6 8 6 8
    >
    >
    > "Daniel Antonson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> What is the effect of the following code?
    >>
    >> char Ch;
    >>
    >> while ((Ch=getchar() ) != ';')
    >>
    >> putchar (Ch);
    >>
    >> a. It will read and write characters until something other than a ;
    >> is
    >> read.
    >>
    >> b. It will read characters up to and including the first semicolon,
    >>
    >> and write characters up to but not including the first semicolon.
    >>
    >> c. It will read and write characters up to but not including the
    >> first
    >> semicolon.
    >>
    >> d. It will skip characters up to the first semicolon, then write
    >> the
    >>
    >> next character.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >
    John Smith, Jul 6, 2005
    #4
  5. Daniel Antonson

    John Smith Guest

    Daniel:

    If you use all my answers, at the very least you will get a passing
    grade...

    John

    "Daniel Antonson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Fellow programmers,
    >
    > As one of you pointed out, I've been taking 3 online courses (2 are
    > done)
    > and have run into a time crunch. I started these courses in Oct04,
    > but
    > between work (US Army in DC), caring for my wife (stroke in Dec03
    > due to
    > lupus complications) & daughter (4), and preparing for
    > transfer/deployment
    > (my stepson,- 23, says he'll care for them during my absence). I've
    > had
    > little time for anything else.
    >
    > I would greatly appreciate your assistance. Granted, it isn't the
    > proper
    > approach, but the time
    > remaining demands urgent solutions.
    >
    > very respectfully,
    > Daniel
    >
    > 1. Which of the following usually indicates that there is no more
    > input to
    > be read by a program?
    >
    > a. '\n'
    > b. '\0'
    > c. END
    > d. EOF
    >
    >
    > 2. What is the effect of the following code?
    > char Ch;
    > Ch = '7';
    > printf("%d\n", Ch);
    >
    > a. It will cause an error
    > b. It will print out the computer's internal code for the character
    > '7'
    > c. It will print out the character '7'
    > d. It will print out the character whose internal code is 7
    >
    >
    > 3. What is the effect of the following code?
    > char Ch;
    > while ((Ch=getchar() ) != ';')
    > putchar (Ch);
    >
    > a. It will read and write characters until something other than a ;
    > is read.
    > b. It will read characters up to and including the first semicolon,
    > and
    > write characters up to but not including the first semicolon.
    > c. It will read and write characters up to but not including the
    > first
    > semicolon.
    > d. It will skip characters up to the first semicolon, then write the
    > next
    > character.
    >
    >
    > 4. It is necessary to use an int instead of a char for processing a
    > character:
    >
    > a. whenever a computation is performed on the character.
    > b. whenever a test for EOF is made.
    > c. whenever the character is passed as a parameter to a function.
    > d. It is never necessary to use an int for character processing.
    >
    >
    > 5. What characters are output by the following code:
    >
    > char Ch='/';
    > while (Ch != 'd')
    > {
    > putchar(Ch);
    > Ch = getchar();
    > }
    >
    > given the following input? abcdefghi
    >
    > a. abc
    > b. d
    > c. /abc
    > d. /efghi
    >
    >
    > 6. What is the effect of the following code?
    >
    > char Ch;
    > while ((Ch = getchar()) != '\n')
    > putchar(' ');
    >
    > a. It reads and writes exactly one line with a blank after each
    > character.
    > b. It reads one line but outputs only blanks.
    > c. It reads a line and then outputs one blank.
    > d. It reads and writes one line with all blanks replaced by
    > newlines.
    >
    >
    > 7. In general, when an int is combined with a long in an expression,
    > the
    > result is:
    >
    > a. int
    > b. long
    > c. double
    > d. A syntax error
    >
    >
    > 8. Given the following declarations:
    >
    > int N;
    > char C;
    > float X;
    >
    > what is the type of the expression C+N*X?
    >
    > a. char
    > b. int
    > c. float
    > d. The expression contains a syntax error
    >
    >
    > 9. Given the following declarations and initialization:
    >
    > int i = 1;
    > int x = 2.0;
    >
    > What is the value and type of the expression i/x?
    >
    > a. .5 double
    > b. .5 int
    > c. 0.0 float
    > d. 0 int
    >
    >
    > 10. Given the following declarations and initializations:
    >
    > int n = 8;
    > int z = 2.0;
    >
    > What is the value and type of the expression z=n?
    >
    > a. 8 int
    > b. 8 float
    > c. 8 double
    > d. 8 unsigned
    >
    >
    > 11. Which of the following statements is true?
    > a. int expressions are always computed exactly; but float
    > expressions can
    > suffer round-off error
    > b. float expressions are always computed exactly; but int
    > expressions can
    > suffer round-off error
    > c. Both int and float expressions can suffer round-off error
    > d. Both int and float expressions will always be computed exactly
    >
    >
    > 12. Given the following declarations:
    >
    > int N;
    > float X;
    >
    > what is the type of the expression X%N?
    >
    > a. int
    > b. float
    > c. double
    > d. can't use float with %
    >
    >
    > 13. Choose the C statement which defines an enumeration type fuzzy
    > consisting of values false, maybe, and true. Defined so that maybe
    > is
    > greater in value than false but less than true.
    >
    > a. enum fuzzy {false, maybe, true};
    > b. enum fuzzy {true, false, maybe};
    > c. enum fuzzy {false, maybe, true}
    > d. enum fuzzy {true, maybe, false};
    >
    >
    > 14. Given the type definition below:
    >
    > enum color {red, yellow, green, blue};
    >
    > what is the value of the expression (int) blue?
    >
    > a. 2
    > b. 3
    > c. 4
    > d. blue
    >
    >
    > 15. Which of the following statements allocates space for a variable
    > of the
    > defined enum type?
    >
    > a. enum color {red, yellow, blue} paint;
    > b. enum color {red, yellow, blue};
    > c. enum {red, yellow, blue} paint;
    > d. a and c
    >
    >
    > Answer questions 16 and 17 given the following values for the int
    > variables
    > X and Y
    >
    > X=1100110000110011
    > Y=0000111100001010
    >
    >
    > 16. What is the binary representation of X<<5?
    >
    > a. 1000011001100000
    > b. 1000011001111111
    > c. 0000110011000000
    > d. 0000110011111111
    >
    >
    > 17. What is the two's complement of -Y (negative Y)?
    >
    > a. 0000111100001010
    > b. 1111000011110101
    > c. 1111000011110110
    > d. 1100000000110001
    >
    >
    > 18. If X is an int variable, what do we know about the value of X&X?
    >
    > a. It is always equal to X.
    > b. It is always greater than 1.
    > c. It is always equal to zero.
    > d. It is always equal to 1.
    >
    >
    > 19. A pointer variable contains:
    >
    > a. an integer.
    > b. the address of another variable.
    > c. any data type.
    > d. a character string.
    >
    >
    > 20. The term "dereferencing" means:
    >
    > a. taking the address of another variable.
    > b. deleting a variable.
    > c. retrieving the value of a variable given its address.
    > d. making an assignment to a pointer variable.
    >
    >
    > 21. Which of the statements below is true of the following
    > declaration:
    >
    > int n=5, *p=&n;
    >
    > a. p is a pointer initialized to point to n.
    > b. p is a pointer initialized to the value 5.
    > c. n and p are both pointer variables.
    > d. The declaration contains a syntax error
    >
    >
    > 22. Call-by-reference is:
    >
    > a. not available in C.
    > b. accomplished by declaring a formal parameter to be a pointer.
    > c. accomplished be using a de-referenced pointer as a parameter.
    > d. accomplished by putting an ampersand (&) in the formal parameter.
    >
    >
    > 23. If you want a variable declared inside a function to retain its
    > previous
    > value when the block is re-entered, what type of storage class
    > should you
    > use?
    >
    > a. auto
    > b. static
    > c. register
    > d. extern
    >
    >
    > 24. The address operator & cannot be applied to which of the
    > following?
    >
    > a. constants
    > b. expressions
    > c. variables of class register
    > d. All of the above
    >
    >
    > 25. Write the output produced by the following code:
    >
    > int x=5, y=6, *p=&x, *q=&y;
    > x=*q;
    > *p = *q + 2;
    > *q=x;
    > printf("%d %d %d %d\n", x, y, *p, *q);
    >
    > a. 8 8 8 8
    > b. 5 6 5 6
    > c. 6 8 5 6
    > d. 6 8 6 8
    >
    >
    > "Daniel Antonson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> What is the effect of the following code?
    >>
    >> char Ch;
    >>
    >> while ((Ch=getchar() ) != ';')
    >>
    >> putchar (Ch);
    >>
    >> a. It will read and write characters until something other than a ;
    >> is
    >> read.
    >>
    >> b. It will read characters up to and including the first semicolon,
    >>
    >> and write characters up to but not including the first semicolon.
    >>
    >> c. It will read and write characters up to but not including the
    >> first
    >> semicolon.
    >>
    >> d. It will skip characters up to the first semicolon, then write
    >> the
    >>
    >> next character.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >
    John Smith, Jul 6, 2005
    #5
  6. Daniel Antonson

    Alan Johnson Guest

    Re: In a timeline pinch (Suspense: 25Jul05) pleading for assistance- Q1

    Daniel Antonson wrote:

    > 2. What is the effect of the following code?
    > char Ch;
    > Ch = '7';
    > printf("%d\n", Ch);
    >
    > a. It will cause an error
    > b. It will print out the computer's internal code for the character '7'
    > c. It will print out the character '7'
    > d. It will print out the character whose internal code is 7


    I don't have a copy of the C standard handy to check, but I think that
    none of these is actually correct, as the program fragment exhibits
    undefined behavior.
    Alan Johnson, Jul 7, 2005
    #6
  7. Daniel Antonson

    John Smith Guest

    Alan:

    The code obviously prints out the ascii value (55) of the character
    '7'.

    %d instructs the printf statement to print an integer representation

    John

    "Alan Johnson" <_edu> wrote in message
    news:dahplv$4mm$...
    > Daniel Antonson wrote:
    >
    >> 2. What is the effect of the following code?
    >> char Ch;
    >> Ch = '7';
    >> printf("%d\n", Ch);
    >>
    >> a. It will cause an error
    >> b. It will print out the computer's internal code for the character
    >> '7'
    >> c. It will print out the character '7'
    >> d. It will print out the character whose internal code is 7

    >
    > I don't have a copy of the C standard handy to check, but I think
    > that none of these is actually correct, as the program fragment
    > exhibits undefined behavior.
    John Smith, Jul 7, 2005
    #7
  8. Daniel Antonson

    David White Guest

    John Smith wrote:
    > Daniel:
    >
    > If you use all my answers, at the very least you will get a passing
    > grade...


    And he won't have learned a thing. Perhaps you can explain to us what you
    think the purpose of a course is?

    DW
    David White, Jul 7, 2005
    #8
  9. Daniel Antonson

    John Smith Guest

    David:

    I obviously do not need to explain anything at all to you, your are
    rude and quite egotistical in even suggesting I should. What foreign
    country have you been spawned in.

    Put simply, "NONE OF YOUR DAMN BUSINESS!"

    Besides, that is a very simplistic test, anyone with a text book on c
    could get to that speed in hours... just been decades since I was in
    college and I am a bit old, rusty and slow :(
    --or--
    I would have answered more quickly!

    John

    "David White" <> wrote in message
    news:x6_ye.23398$...
    > John Smith wrote:
    >> Daniel:
    >>
    >> If you use all my answers, at the very least you will get a passing
    >> grade...

    >
    > And he won't have learned a thing. Perhaps you can explain to us
    > what you
    > think the purpose of a course is?
    >
    > DW
    >
    >
    John Smith, Jul 7, 2005
    #9
  10. Daniel Antonson

    red floyd Guest

    Re: In a timeline pinch (Suspense: 25Jul05) pleading for assistance- Q1

    John Smith wrote:
    > Alan:
    >
    > The code obviously prints out the ascii value (55) of the character
    > '7'.
    >
    > %d instructs the printf statement to print an integer representation
    >
    > John
    >
    > "Alan Johnson" <_edu> wrote in message
    > news:dahplv$4mm$...
    >
    >>Daniel Antonson wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>2. What is the effect of the following code?
    >>>char Ch;
    >>>Ch = '7';
    >>>printf("%d\n", Ch);
    >>>
    >>>a. It will cause an error
    >>>b. It will print out the computer's internal code for the character
    >>>'7'
    >>>c. It will print out the character '7'
    >>>d. It will print out the character whose internal code is 7

    >>
    >>I don't have a copy of the C standard handy to check, but I think
    >>that none of these is actually correct, as the program fragment
    >>exhibits undefined behavior.

    >
    >
    >


    But Ch isn't cast to an int, and since printf() is variadic, there is no
    guarantee as to what is actually passed as a parameter. I also do not
    have my copy of the Standard available, but I'd be willing to bet it's UB.
    red floyd, Jul 7, 2005
    #10
  11. Daniel Antonson

    red floyd Guest

    Re: In a timeline pinch (Suspense: 25Jul05) pleading for assistance- Q1

    John Smith wrote:
    > [redacted]


    Oh, and please don't top post, though since you apparently don't care
    about the rules of etiquette for this NG (i.e. answering a blatant
    "Do-my-homework" request in full), I doubt you'll care about that either.
    red floyd, Jul 7, 2005
    #11
  12. Daniel Antonson

    John Smith Guest

    Red:

    This will work:

    char ch = '7';

    printf("ch = %ld\n", ch);

    not only will it work on an ibm pc, but has worked on any mainframe I
    have ran on over the decades...

    printf("ch = %d\n", (int)ch);
    --or--
    printf("ch = %ld\n", (long double)ch);

    will also work great...

    weather the c standard mentions that the upper bits of a larger type
    used in a printf will always be guaranteed to be zero or not, I do not
    know, nor care, they have been on every system I have ran... at this
    point I would have to seen an error occur to get worried, and see
    garbage printed out when an int %d in a printf statement is fed a
    char...

    .... it would not surprise me at all if the new "c" standard mentions a
    type cast is automatically done on the data, as fits the occasion...

    John

    "red floyd" <> wrote in message
    news:Zm_ye.39985$...
    > John Smith wrote:
    >> Alan:
    >>
    >> The code obviously prints out the ascii value (55) of the character
    >> '7'.
    >>
    >> %d instructs the printf statement to print an integer
    >> representation
    >>
    >> John
    >>
    >> "Alan Johnson" <_edu> wrote in message
    >> news:dahplv$4mm$...
    >>
    >>>Daniel Antonson wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>2. What is the effect of the following code?
    >>>>char Ch;
    >>>>Ch = '7';
    >>>>printf("%d\n", Ch);
    >>>>
    >>>>a. It will cause an error
    >>>>b. It will print out the computer's internal code for the
    >>>>character '7'
    >>>>c. It will print out the character '7'
    >>>>d. It will print out the character whose internal code is 7
    >>>
    >>>I don't have a copy of the C standard handy to check, but I think
    >>>that none of these is actually correct, as the program fragment
    >>>exhibits undefined behavior.

    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > But Ch isn't cast to an int, and since printf() is variadic, there
    > is no guarantee as to what is actually passed as a parameter. I
    > also do not have my copy of the Standard available, but I'd be
    > willing to bet it's UB.
    John Smith, Jul 7, 2005
    #12
  13. Daniel Antonson

    John Smith Guest

    Red:

    Now here you are quite correct.

    The old standards of news groups needs up-dating.

    If you need my text formatted in some particular fashion to meet your
    standards--write a plug-in for your news reader.

    I give you my full permission to view my text in any form which would
    please you. You need not ask my permission for any future postings...

    If you need help with programming the plug-in, just ask...

    John

    "red floyd" <> wrote in message
    news:_n_ye.39986$...
    > John Smith wrote:
    >> [redacted]

    >
    > Oh, and please don't top post, though since you apparently don't
    > care about the rules of etiquette for this NG (i.e. answering a
    > blatant "Do-my-homework" request in full), I doubt you'll care about
    > that either.
    John Smith, Jul 7, 2005
    #13
  14. Daniel Antonson

    Me Guest

    > >>>2. What is the effect of the following code?
    > >>>char Ch;
    > >>>Ch = '7';
    > >>>printf("%d\n", Ch);
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>I don't have a copy of the C standard handy to check, but I think
    > >>that none of these is actually correct, as the program fragment
    > >>exhibits undefined behavior.

    >
    > But Ch isn't cast to an int, and since printf() is variadic, there is no
    > guarantee as to what is actually passed as a parameter. I also do not
    > have my copy of the Standard available, but I'd be willing to bet it's UB.


    Default argument promotions are done to values passed to the ... in
    varadic functions so char gets promoted to int (or unsigned int on
    weird implementations) here.
    Me, Jul 7, 2005
    #14
  15. Daniel Antonson

    Old Wolf Guest

    David White wrote:
    > John Smith wrote:
    > >
    > > If you use all my answers, at the very least you will get a passing
    > > grade...

    >
    > And he won't have learned a thing. Perhaps you can explain to us what you
    > think the purpose of a course is?


    I wouldn't worry too much.. judging by the other clunkers that
    "John Smith" has come up with on this thread, the OP would probably
    fail the test anyway. For example:

    John Smith wrote:
    > printf("ch = %ld\n", (long double)ch);
    > will also work great...
    Old Wolf, Jul 7, 2005
    #15
  16. Daniel Antonson

    Bill Guest

    Re: In a timeline pinch (Suspense: 25Jul05) pleading for assistance- Q1

    red floyd wrote:
    > John Smith wrote:
    >
    >> Alan:


    SNIP

    >>

    >
    > But Ch isn't cast to an int, and since printf() is variadic, there is no
    > guarantee as to what is actually passed as a parameter. I also do not
    > have my copy of the Standard available, but I'd be willing to bet it's UB.


    The code is standard compliant and correct. char is always promoted when
    passed as an argument.

    I'm a little surprised at all the posts where people seem to want to
    guess at the standard rather than actually reading it.

    Bill
    Bill, Jul 7, 2005
    #16
  17. Daniel Antonson

    Bill Guest

    Re: In a timeline pinch (Suspense: 25Jul05) pleading for assistance- Q1

    Bill wrote:
    > red floyd wrote:
    >
    >> John Smith wrote:


    SNIP............

    >
    > I'm a little surprised at all the posts where people seem to want to
    > guess at the standard rather than actually reading it.
    >
    > Bill



    Following up my previous posting, the relevant sections in the C++
    standard are Section 5.2.2, Paragraph 7, and Section 4.5.

    Bill
    Bill, Jul 7, 2005
    #17
  18. John Smith wrote:
    >
    > David:
    >
    > I obviously do not need to explain anything at all to you, your are
    > rude and quite egotistical in even suggesting I should. What foreign
    > country have you been spawned in.
    >
    > Put simply, "NONE OF YOUR DAMN BUSINESS!"
    >
    > Besides, that is a very simplistic test


    Right. And this is exactly why the OP should be able to answer all of the
    questions. Anybody who cannot answer at least most of those questions simply
    should not call himself a programmer.

    --
    Karl Heinz Buchegger
    Karl Heinz Buchegger, Jul 7, 2005
    #18
  19. John Smith wrote:
    >
    > Red:
    >
    > This will work:
    >
    > char ch = '7';
    >
    > printf("ch = %ld\n", ch);


    Sorry, you failed the test.

    >
    > not only will it work on an ibm pc, but has worked on any mainframe I
    > have ran on over the decades...
    >
    > printf("ch = %d\n", (int)ch);


    That one is ok.

    > --or--
    > printf("ch = %ld\n", (long double)ch);
    >


    Oh my god!

    > will also work great...


    No, it won't

    --
    Karl Heinz Buchegger
    Karl Heinz Buchegger, Jul 7, 2005
    #19
  20. Daniel Antonson

    red floyd Guest

    Re: In a timeline pinch (Suspense: 25Jul05) pleading for assistance- Q1

    Bill wrote:
    > [redacted]


    > Following up my previous posting, the relevant sections in the C++
    > standard are Section 5.2.2, Paragraph 7, and Section 4.5.
    >
    > Bill


    Thanks for the chapter&verse. I *said* I had a standard, but was
    posting from home. Now I know. Thank you.
    red floyd, Jul 7, 2005
    #20
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