In C++ programming, what librarys or frameworks are you using?

Discussion in 'C++' started by CppNewer, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. CppNewer

    CppNewer Guest

    Or most peopel use the OS' API directly? or everyone made own series
    of library such as Socket, Thread API.
     
    CppNewer, Feb 22, 2008
    #1
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  2. CppNewer

    Guest

    On 2ÔÂ22ÈÕ, ÏÂÎç1ʱ44·Ö, CppNewer <> wrote:
    > Or most peopel use the OS' API directly? or everyone made own series
    > of library such as Socket, Thread API.


    gcc&g++
     
    , Feb 22, 2008
    #2
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  3. CppNewer

    Lars Uffmann Guest

    CppNewer wrote:
    > Or most peopel use the OS' API directly? or everyone made own series
    > of library such as Socket, Thread API.


    I'm currently using:

    - wxWidgets (big difference to what I was used to, with the sizer
    concept, but worth a look) with wxFormBuilder
    - boost::thread
    - winsock2 (supposed to be compatible to sockets-library under linux)
    - xerces-c (domxml parsing)

    all of this with Eclipse CDT & Cygwin, thinking about "migrating" to
    MinGW though, for not needing cygwin1.dll or similar.

    Best Regards,

    Lars
     
    Lars Uffmann, Feb 22, 2008
    #3
  4. On 2008-02-22 06:44, CppNewer wrote:
    > Or most peopel use the OS' API directly? or everyone made own series
    > of library such as Socket, Thread API.


    Depends on what kind of application I'm writing, I usually try to keep
    the number of dependencies small. In the projects I'm currently working
    on I use the C++ standard library, whatever I in POSIX, and Qt 3.

    --
    Erik Wikström
     
    Erik Wikström, Feb 23, 2008
    #4
  5. CppNewer

    Jeff Schwab Guest

    CppNewer wrote:
    > Or most peopel use the OS' API directly? or everyone made own series
    > of library such as Socket, Thread API.


    POSIX and Qt4.

    You know what I would love? A great big honkin' printed tutorial on the
    parts of Boost that could replace direct calls to POSIX. I would
    particularly like portable access to the local file-system and to the
    network, and portable concurrency. I'm aware that Boost provides these
    libraries, but what I really want is an Addison-Wesley Professional
    hardcover showing me how to use them. I guess that book won't exist
    until TR2 makes it into C++1x.
     
    Jeff Schwab, Feb 23, 2008
    #5
  6. CppNewer

    Guest

    On Feb 23, 8:25 am, Jeff Schwab <> wrote:
    >
    > POSIX and Qt4.
    >
    > You know what I would love?  A great big honkin' printed tutorial on the
    > parts of Boost that could replace direct calls to POSIX.  I would
    > particularly like portable access to the local file-system and to the
    > network, and portable concurrency.  I'm aware that Boost provides these
    > libraries, but what I really want is an Addison-Wesley Professional
    > hardcover showing me how to use them.  I guess that book won't exist
    > until TR2 makes it into C++1x.


    I doubt it will take that long. I'm interested in hearing about
    C++ related books that are in the works, but haven't been published
    yet.

    Brian Wood
     
    , Feb 23, 2008
    #6
  7. CppNewer

    Guest

    On Feb 21, 11:44 pm, CppNewer <> wrote:
    > Or most peopel use the OS' API directly? or everyone made own series
    > of library such as Socket, Thread API.


    Here's one related to sockets and marshalling -
    www.webebenezer.net

    Brian Wood
     
    , Feb 23, 2008
    #7
  8. EventHelix.com, Feb 23, 2008
    #8
  9. CppNewer

    Guest

    On Feb 23, 9:25 am, Jeff Schwab <> wrote:
    > CppNewer wrote:
    > > Or most peopel use the OS' API directly? or everyone made own series
    > > of library such as Socket, Thread API.

    >
    > POSIX and Qt4.
    >
    > You know what I would love? A great big honkin' printed tutorial on the
    > parts of Boost that could replace direct calls to POSIX. I would
    > particularly like portable access to the local file-system and to the
    > network, and portable concurrency. I'm aware that Boost provides these
    > libraries, but what I really want is an Addison-Wesley Professional
    > hardcover showing me how to use them. I guess that book won't exist
    > until TR2 makes it into C++1x.


    I have been using this library (dclib.sourceforge.net) to do all of
    that stuff portably and I think the documentation is pretty good. But
    then again I wrote it :)
     
    , Feb 24, 2008
    #9
  10. CppNewer

    Jeff Schwab Guest

    wrote:
    > On Feb 23, 9:25 am, Jeff Schwab <> wrote:
    >> CppNewer wrote:
    >>> Or most peopel use the OS' API directly? or everyone made own series
    >>> of library such as Socket, Thread API.

    >> POSIX and Qt4.
    >>
    >> You know what I would love? A great big honkin' printed tutorial on the
    >> parts of Boost that could replace direct calls to POSIX. I would
    >> particularly like portable access to the local file-system and to the
    >> network, and portable concurrency. I'm aware that Boost provides these
    >> libraries, but what I really want is an Addison-Wesley Professional
    >> hardcover showing me how to use them. I guess that book won't exist
    >> until TR2 makes it into C++1x.

    >
    > I have been using this library (dclib.sourceforge.net) to do all of
    > that stuff portably and I think the documentation is pretty good. But
    > then again I wrote it :)


    Thanks, that looks interesting. Now that std::tr1::array exists, are
    you going to keep array_kernel_2?
     
    Jeff Schwab, Feb 24, 2008
    #10
  11. CppNewer

    Guest

    On Feb 24, 11:16 am, Jeff Schwab <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > On Feb 23, 9:25 am, Jeff Schwab <> wrote:
    > >> CppNewer wrote:
    > >>> Or most peopel use the OS' API directly? or everyone made own series
    > >>> of library such as Socket, Thread API.
    > >> POSIX and Qt4.

    >
    > >> You know what I would love? A great big honkin' printed tutorial on the
    > >> parts of Boost that could replace direct calls to POSIX. I would
    > >> particularly like portable access to the local file-system and to the
    > >> network, and portable concurrency. I'm aware that Boost provides these
    > >> libraries, but what I really want is an Addison-Wesley Professional
    > >> hardcover showing me how to use them. I guess that book won't exist
    > >> until TR2 makes it into C++1x.

    >
    > > I have been using this library (dclib.sourceforge.net) to do all of
    > > that stuff portably and I think the documentation is pretty good. But
    > > then again I wrote it :)

    >
    > Thanks, that looks interesting. Now that std::tr1::array exists, are
    > you going to keep array_kernel_2?


    I probably will at least until C++0x is finalized and the tr1 stuff is
    moved into the std namespace. The same goes for anything else that
    is redundant with things in dlib (like the dlib::shared_ptr).
     
    , Feb 24, 2008
    #11
  12. CppNewer

    Guest

    On Feb 24, 9:18 am, "" <> wrote:
    >
    > I have been using this library (dclib.sourceforge.net) to do all of
    > that stuff portably and I think thedocumentationis pretty good.  But
    > then again I wrote it :)


    On this page
    http://dclib.sourceforge.net/dlib/serialize.h.html
    it says, "Note that you should only try to deserialize an object to
    the type of object it was serialized from. I.e. don't try anything
    like loading a set with the serialized data of a queue." Why do you
    impose that restriction? I don't have an application where I want
    that functionality, but I've thought that it would probably be useful
    at some point.

    Brian Wood
     
    , Feb 26, 2008
    #12
  13. CppNewer

    Gerry Ford Guest

    Will you elaborate?

    --
    Gerry Ford

    "Er hat sich georgiert." Der Spiegel, 2008, sich auf Chimpy Eins komma null
    beziehend.
    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Feb 24, 9:18 am, "" <> wrote:
    >
    > I have been using this library (dclib.sourceforge.net) to do all of
    > that stuff portably and I think thedocumentationis pretty good. But
    > then again I wrote it :)


    On this page
    http://dclib.sourceforge.net/dlib/serialize.h.html
    it says, "Note that you should only try to deserialize an object to
    the type of object it was serialized from. I.e. don't try anything
    like loading a set with the serialized data of a queue." Why do you
    impose that restriction? I don't have an application where I want
    that functionality, but I've thought that it would probably be useful
    at some point.

    Brian Wood
     
    Gerry Ford, Feb 26, 2008
    #13
  14. CppNewer

    Guest

    On Feb 25, 8:43 pm, "Gerry Ford" <> wrote:
    > Will you elaborate?
    >
    > --
    > Gerry Ford
    >
    > "Er hat sich georgiert." Der Spiegel, 2008, sich auf Chimpy Eins komma null
    > beziehend.<> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    > On Feb 24, 9:18 am, "" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > I have been using this library (dclib.sourceforge.net) to do all of
    > > that stuff portably and I think thedocumentationis pretty good. But
    > > then again I wrote it :)

    >
    > On this pagehttp://dclib.sourceforge.net/dlib/serialize.h.html
    > it says, "Note that you should only try to deserialize an object to
    > the type of object it was serialized from. I.e. don't try anything
    > like loading a set with the serialized data of a queue." Why do you
    > impose that restriction? I don't have an application where I want
    > that functionality, but I've thought that it would probably be useful
    > at some point.
    >
    > Brian Wood


    Well, the set object requires that every element in it be unique (i.e.
    it isn't a multiset) so there are valid queue objects that can't be
    loaded into sets. So all I'm saying is that if you are doing stuff
    like that it isn't guaranteed to work since the source object might
    violate some requirement imposed by the destination object type.
    However, If you had a queue of unique integers then you could load
    that into a set via deserialize without any problem.

    Perhaps I should make that part of the documentation more clear. :)

    -Davis
     
    , Feb 26, 2008
    #14
  15. CppNewer

    Guest

    On Feb 26, 9:25 am, "" <> wrote:
    >
    > Well, the set object requires that every element in it be unique (i.e.
    > it isn't a multiset) so there are valid queue objects that can't be
    > loaded into sets.


    OK, but I wouldn't say it as "can't be loaded into sets." Data from a
    queue<int> can be loaded into a set<int>, but the size of the set
    might be less than the size of the queue. As long as users are aware
    of that I think things should be fine. A documentation note as you
    mention, could warn people to consider this possibility.

    Brian Wood
     
    , Feb 26, 2008
    #15
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