Indian Programmers

Discussion in 'C++' started by K4 Monk, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. K4 Monk

    K4 Monk Guest

    if you hate Indian programmers, post in this thread.
     
    K4 Monk, Feb 24, 2011
    #1
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  2. K4 Monk

    jacob navia Guest

    Le 24/02/11 13:17, K4 Monk a écrit :
    > if you hate Indian programmers, post in this thread.


    Mmm, I do not hate Indian programmers but I do hate assholes.

    They are a REAL nuisance
     
    jacob navia, Feb 24, 2011
    #2
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  3. K4 Monk

    Paul Guest

    If I was Indian I would find this funny.
    I find the whole racism thing quite funny unless it becomes abusive.

    Note: By replying to this I do not claim to hate Indians or Indian
    programmers.I think some of the greatest minds in the world are that of
    Indian people.

    Go Indians! Get coding in you wigwams.
    :)
     
    Paul, Feb 24, 2011
    #3
  4. On Feb 24, 8:26 pm, "Paul" <> wrote:
    > If I was Indian I would find this funny.
    > I find the whole racism thing quite funny unless it becomes abusive.
    >
    > Note: By replying to this I do not claim to hate Indians or Indian
    > programmers.I think some of the greatest minds in the world are that of
    > Indian people.


    but consider how many Indians there are. If you have a country of over
    one billion people, some of them are deemed to be great minds. The
    only problem I have with my fellow Indian programmers is that they are
    never truly passionate about programming. Most of them are just in the
    business because its the booming industry in India.
     
    Rohit Tripathi, Feb 24, 2011
    #4
  5. K4 Monk

    James Kanze Guest

    On Feb 24, 8:11 pm, Rohit Tripathi <> wrote:
    > On Feb 24, 8:26 pm, "Paul" <> wrote:


    > > If I was Indian I would find this funny.
    > > I find the whole racism thing quite funny unless it becomes abusive.


    > > Note: By replying to this I do not claim to hate Indians or Indian
    > > programmers.I think some of the greatest minds in the world are that of
    > > Indian people.


    > but consider how many Indians there are. If you have a country of over
    > one billion people, some of them are deemed to be great minds. The
    > only problem I have with my fellow Indian programmers is that they are
    > never truly passionate about programming. Most of them are just in the
    > business because its the booming industry in India.


    And that's not the case elsewhere? In just about any profession
    (some professions in the arts are probably exceptions), anywhere
    in the world, things like opportunities and potential income
    enter into the choice, at least to some degree.

    --
    James Kanze
     
    James Kanze, Feb 25, 2011
    #5
  6. K4 Monk

    rep_movsd Guest

    It's a very typical reaction - there are a lot of mediocre programmers
    in India, but assuming all of them are, is pretty naive.
    There are people everywhere, who are in the industry with career as a
    primary goal, whereas those of us who are passionate about it, have
    been doing it for a major part of our life (I for one, since I was 8),
    and will continue doing it until we're senile, whether we're paid for
    it or not.
     
    rep_movsd, Feb 25, 2011
    #6
  7. K4 Monk

    James Kanze Guest

    On Feb 25, 1:38 pm, rep_movsd <> wrote:
    > It's a very typical reaction - there are a lot of mediocre programmers
    > in India, but assuming all of them are, is pretty naive.


    Just because someone chose this profession partially for
    financial reasons doesn't necessarily mean he's mediocre. And
    all of the Indian programmers I've known have been very good
    (but then, I've not known as many as I've known French, German
    or British programmers).

    > There are people everywhere, who are in the industry with career as a
    > primary goal, whereas those of us who are passionate about it, have
    > been doing it for a major part of our life (I for one, since I was 8),
    > and will continue doing it until we're senile, whether we're paid for
    > it or not.


    I don't think it's necessarily a binary choice. If I had
    a totally free choice about what to do fifty hours a week,
    uninfluenced by pecunary constraints, it wouldn't be
    programming. But I do like programming as well, and if my
    profession were something else, I'd probably do some programming
    as a hobby.

    --
    James Kanze
     
    James Kanze, Feb 25, 2011
    #7
  8. K4 Monk

    Paul Guest

    "James Kanze" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Feb 25, 1:38 pm, rep_movsd <> wrote:
    >> It's a very typical reaction - there are a lot of mediocre programmers
    >> in India, but assuming all of them are, is pretty naive.

    >
    > Just because someone chose this profession partially for
    > financial reasons doesn't necessarily mean he's mediocre. And
    > all of the Indian programmers I've known have been very good
    > (but then, I've not known as many as I've known French, German
    > or British programmers).
    >
    >> There are people everywhere, who are in the industry with career as a
    >> primary goal, whereas those of us who are passionate about it, have
    >> been doing it for a major part of our life (I for one, since I was 8),
    >> and will continue doing it until we're senile, whether we're paid for
    >> it or not.

    >
    > I don't think it's necessarily a binary choice. If I had
    > a totally free choice about what to do fifty hours a week,
    > uninfluenced by pecunary constraints, it wouldn't be
    > programming. But I do like programming as well, and if my
    > profession were something else, I'd probably do some programming
    > as a hobby.
    >

    Does this mean if you had been a Java programmer you would dismiss the
    official Java documents as unofficial irrellevant nonsense?
    As you did in our last debate.
     
    Paul, Feb 25, 2011
    #8
  9. K4 Monk

    Paul Guest

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:3AS9p.128157$2...
    >
    > "James Kanze" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Feb 25, 1:38 pm, rep_movsd <> wrote:
    >>> It's a very typical reaction - there are a lot of mediocre programmers
    >>> in India, but assuming all of them are, is pretty naive.

    >>
    >> Just because someone chose this profession partially for
    >> financial reasons doesn't necessarily mean he's mediocre. And
    >> all of the Indian programmers I've known have been very good
    >> (but then, I've not known as many as I've known French, German
    >> or British programmers).
    >>
    >>> There are people everywhere, who are in the industry with career as a
    >>> primary goal, whereas those of us who are passionate about it, have
    >>> been doing it for a major part of our life (I for one, since I was 8),
    >>> and will continue doing it until we're senile, whether we're paid for
    >>> it or not.

    >>
    >> I don't think it's necessarily a binary choice. If I had
    >> a totally free choice about what to do fifty hours a week,
    >> uninfluenced by pecunary constraints, it wouldn't be
    >> programming. But I do like programming as well, and if my
    >> profession were something else, I'd probably do some programming
    >> as a hobby.
    >>

    > Does this mean if you had been a Java programmer you would dismiss the
    > official Java documents as unofficial irrellevant nonsense?
    > As you did in our last debate.
    >

    It's a shame you think you know more about Java than the official Java docs,
    I used to think you have some more sense.
     
    Paul, Feb 25, 2011
    #9
  10. K4 Monk

    Ebenezer Guest

    On Feb 25, 11:44 am, James Kanze <> wrote:
    > On Feb 25, 1:38 pm, rep_movsd <> wrote:
    >
    > > It's a very typical reaction - there are a lot of mediocre programmers
    > > in India, but assuming all of them are, is pretty naive.

    >
    > Just because someone chose this profession partially for
    > financial reasons doesn't necessarily mean he's mediocre.


    Agreed, but I'd point out there's a kind of ongoing choosing
    of what we are going to do and large numbers of programmers
    have sought to pad their accounts by picking the pockets of
    companies. Picking the pockets by turning in mediocre work
    that is perhaps justified by a sense of entitlement. It
    used to be easier to make big bucks as a programmer and
    guard your soul from the devil. These days most large and
    medium sized companies have immoral policies.



    Brian Wood
    Ebenezer Enterprises
    http://webEbenezer.net

    "All the world is just a narrow bridge - the most important
    thing is not to be afraid." Rebbe Nachman
     
    Ebenezer, Feb 26, 2011
    #10
  11. K4 Monk

    James Kanze Guest

    On Feb 26, 6:29 am, Ebenezer <> wrote:
    > On Feb 25, 11:44 am, James Kanze <> wrote:


    > > On Feb 25, 1:38 pm, rep_movsd <> wrote:


    > > > It's a very typical reaction - there are a lot of mediocre
    > > > programmers in India, but assuming all of them are, is
    > > > pretty naive.


    > > Just because someone chose this profession partially for
    > > financial reasons doesn't necessarily mean he's mediocre.


    > Agreed, but I'd point out there's a kind of ongoing choosing
    > of what we are going to do and large numbers of programmers
    > have sought to pad their accounts by picking the pockets of
    > companies. Picking the pockets by turning in mediocre work
    > that is perhaps justified by a sense of entitlement. It
    > used to be easier to make big bucks as a programmer and
    > guard your soul from the devil. These days most large and
    > medium sized companies have immoral policies.


    I'm not sure that the number is that large, although I have seen
    a few. Most of the mediocre work I've seen has been because the
    companies wanted it that way; they used a process which
    encouraged mediocre work, and in many cases, put impediments in
    front of the programmers to prevent them from doing good work.

    --
    James Kanze
     
    James Kanze, Feb 26, 2011
    #11
  12. K4 Monk

    gb77

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    I just had to respond to this thread

    It's not so much that I hate Indian programmers or people for that matter, but there are certain things that **** me off when it comes to Indian people.

    1)The fact that they do not have much manners, and can be very rude at times.

    2) A lot of them can smell quite bad ( can you say shower??)

    3) They have a thick accent and yet speak very quickly, and the combination leaves me wondering what they are saying, yet they think they are speaking perfect English. I myself am not a native English speaker, yet try my hardest to speak as clearly as possible and continue to improve my skills.

    4)I hate that I have to close my office door on account of them because they are stinking up the place heating their food. As I said before I was not born here, but out of respect for others I do not bring food to the office that could offend others out of courtesy.

    5) I hate having to hear the same monotone voice with a heavy accent on every tech conference that I go to.


    I am actually thinking about changing career because it just bothers me so much.
     
    gb77, Mar 18, 2011
    #12
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