Inline Underlining in XHTML Strict?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Kelwin Delaunay, Apr 26, 2004.

  1. Hi,

    Is there a way to produce underlined text within a sentence in xhtml strict?

    Thanks,
    Kelwin
     
    Kelwin Delaunay, Apr 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote:

    > Is there a way to produce underlined text within a sentence in xhtml
    > strict?


    Maybe. What does underlining mean in speech, or in Braille? You might
    just as well have asked how to produce red text in XHTML Strict, or how
    to make some words spoken in female voice, or how to make some words have
    a sweet odour in XHTML Strict.

    Try explaining the real problem in context. As usual, a URL is virtuallu
    indispensable. Since we know that links, and only links, should normally
    be underlined on Web pages, and since links are usually underlined by
    default, and if not then there's probably a good reason why not, what
    might justify an attempt to deviate from this? And why would you use
    XHTML Strict?

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Apr 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. "Jukka K. Korpela" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns94D7C282EB687jkorpelacstutfi@193.229.0.31...
    > "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote:
    >
    > > Is there a way to produce underlined text within a sentence in xhtml
    > > strict?

    >
    > Maybe. What does underlining mean in speech, or in Braille? You might
    > just as well have asked how to produce red text in XHTML Strict, or how
    > to make some words spoken in female voice, or how to make some words have
    > a sweet odour in XHTML Strict.
    >
    > Try explaining the real problem in context. As usual, a URL is virtuallu
    > indispensable. Since we know that links, and only links, should normally
    > be underlined on Web pages, and since links are usually underlined by
    > default, and if not then there's probably a good reason why not, what
    > might justify an attempt to deviate from this? And why would you use
    > XHTML Strict?
    >
    > --
    > Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    > Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
    >


    I simply wanted to use the standard convention: a book title appearing in
    text is underlined. I've worked around the problem by using <u> and XHTML
    Transitional, but was looking for an answer in Strict. Why not use Strict if
    the W3C is trying to take us there? Here's the page:
    http://webpages.charter.net/maverickbyconscience/index.htm . The text in
    question is very near the bottom.

    Kelwin
     
    Kelwin Delaunay, Apr 26, 2004
    #3
  4. Kelwin Delaunay

    SpaceGirl Guest

    "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Jukka K. Korpela" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns94D7C282EB687jkorpelacstutfi@193.229.0.31...
    > > "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Is there a way to produce underlined text within a sentence in xhtml
    > > > strict?

    > >
    > > Maybe. What does underlining mean in speech, or in Braille? You might
    > > just as well have asked how to produce red text in XHTML Strict, or how
    > > to make some words spoken in female voice, or how to make some words

    have
    > > a sweet odour in XHTML Strict.
    > >
    > > Try explaining the real problem in context. As usual, a URL is virtuallu
    > > indispensable. Since we know that links, and only links, should normally
    > > be underlined on Web pages, and since links are usually underlined by
    > > default, and if not then there's probably a good reason why not, what
    > > might justify an attempt to deviate from this? And why would you use
    > > XHTML Strict?
    > >
    > > --
    > > Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    > > Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
    > >

    >
    > I simply wanted to use the standard convention: a book title appearing in
    > text is underlined. I've worked around the problem by using <u> and XHTML
    > Transitional, but was looking for an answer in Strict. Why not use Strict

    if
    > the W3C is trying to take us there? Here's the page:
    > http://webpages.charter.net/maverickbyconscience/index.htm . The text in
    > question is very near the bottom.
    >
    > Kelwin



    The thing is, you shouldn't be underlining *anything* unless it's a
    hyperlink.
     
    SpaceGirl, Apr 26, 2004
    #4
  5. Quoth the raven named Kelwin Delaunay:

    > "Jukka K. Korpela" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns94D7C282EB687jkorpelacstutfi@193.229.0.31...
    >
    >> "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is there a way to produce underlined text within a sentence in
    >>> xhtml strict?

    >>
    >> Maybe. What does underlining mean in speech, or in Braille? You
    >> might just as well have asked how to produce red text in XHTML
    >> Strict, or how to make some words spoken in female voice, or how
    >> to make some words have a sweet odour in XHTML Strict.
    >>
    >> Try explaining the real problem in context. As usual, a URL is
    >> virtuallu indispensable. Since we know that links, and only
    >> links, should normally be underlined on Web pages, and since
    >> links are usually underlined by default, and if not then there's
    >> probably a good reason why not, what might justify an attempt to
    >> deviate from this? And why would you use XHTML Strict?
    >>
    >> -- Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/ Pages about Web
    >> authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html

    >
    > I simply wanted to use the standard convention: a book title
    > appearing in text is underlined. I've worked around the problem by
    > using <u> and XHTML Transitional, but was looking for an answer in
    > Strict. Why not use Strict if the W3C is trying to take us there?
    > Here's the page:
    > http://webpages.charter.net/maverickbyconscience/index.htm . The
    > text in question is very near the bottom.


    While I agree with Jukka about only underlining links, if you must
    underline your titles, try this:

    ..uline { text-decoration: underline; }

    <p>... NY Times bestseller list: <span class="uline">"Deliver Us from
    Evil ... </span> ...

    It passes W3C XHTML 1.0 Strict at a page of mine.

    --
    -bts
    -This space intentionally left blank.
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Apr 26, 2004
    #5
  6. "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in message
    news:H6bjc.105902$...
    > While I agree with Jukka about only underlining links, if you must
    > underline your titles, try this:
    >
    > .uline { text-decoration: underline; }
    >
    > <p>... NY Times bestseller list: <span class="uline">"Deliver Us from
    > Evil ... </span> ...
    >
    > It passes W3C XHTML 1.0 Strict at a page of mine.
    >
    > --
    > -bts
    > -This space intentionally left blank.


    Thank you for your help.
    Kelwin
     
    Kelwin Delaunay, Apr 26, 2004
    #6
  7. Kelwin Delaunay

    Steve Pugh Guest

    "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote:
    >
    >I simply wanted to use the standard convention: a book title appearing in
    >text is underlined.


    Is it? I thought that italics were the convention in those media that
    are capable of displaying them.

    >I've worked around the problem by using <u> and XHTML
    >Transitional, but was looking for an answer in Strict.


    <cite class="book">Gone with the Wind</cite>

    cite.book {text-decoration: underline; font-style: italic;}

    >Here's the page:
    >http://webpages.charter.net/maverickbyconscience/index.htm . The text in
    >question is very near the bottom.


    And I instantly moved my mouse over it, even though I'd read these
    posts and knew it wasn't a link. Reserve underlining for links.

    BTW, why isn't the other book title on that page also marked in the
    same way?

    Steve

    --
    "My theories appal you, my heresies outrage you,
    I never answer letters and you don't like my tie." - The Doctor

    Steve Pugh <> <http://steve.pugh.net/>
     
    Steve Pugh, Apr 26, 2004
    #7
  8. Steve Pugh wrote:
    > "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> I simply wanted to use the standard convention: a book title
    >> appearing in text is underlined.

    >
    > Is it? I thought that italics were the convention in those media that
    > are capable of displaying them.


    This is true. Italics are the way to go. Underlining book titles is looked
    down upon in some academic circles these days.


    Kyle
     
    Kyle James Matthews, Apr 27, 2004
    #8
  9. On Tue, 27 Apr 2004 00:08:41 +0000, Kyle James Matthews wrote:

    > This is true. Italics are the way to go. Underlining book titles is looked
    > down upon in some academic circles these days.


    Indeed underlining was only "invented" as a way for authors to mark which
    parts of a book to print in italics on a manuscript before sending it off
    to the printer.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me - http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/?page=132
     
    Toby A Inkster, Apr 27, 2004
    #9
  10. Thanks to all for your help. Italics it is. All revised and and validates as
    XHTML strict.

    Kelwin
     
    Kelwin Delaunay, Apr 27, 2004
    #10
  11. Kelwin Delaunay

    Karl Groves Guest

    "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks to all for your help. Italics it is. All revised and and validates

    as
    > XHTML strict.
    >
    > Kelwin
    >
    >


    Who are you talking to?
    Please quote when you reply.

    -karl
     
    Karl Groves, Apr 27, 2004
    #11
  12. "Karl Groves" <> wrote in message
    news:c6md4e$efi$...
    >
    > "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Thanks to all for your help. Italics it is. All revised and and

    validates
    > as
    > > XHTML strict.
    > >
    > > Kelwin
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Who are you talking to?
    > Please quote when you reply.
    >
    > -karl


    Well, I thought that "all for your help" was pretty clear because that's all
    there is in this thread, but then yours is not the first rude post in this
    thread, either.

    Kelwin
     
    Kelwin Delaunay, Apr 27, 2004
    #12
  13. Kelwin Delaunay

    Karl Groves Guest

    "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Karl Groves" <> wrote in message
    > news:c6md4e$efi$...
    > >
    > > "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Thanks to all for your help. Italics it is. All revised and and

    > validates
    > > as
    > > > XHTML strict.
    > > >
    > > > Kelwin
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > Who are you talking to?
    > > Please quote when you reply.
    > >
    > > -karl

    >
    > Well, I thought that "all for your help" was pretty clear because that's

    all
    > there is in this thread, but then yours is not the first rude post in this
    > thread, either.
    >


    First day on Usenet, huh?

    -Karl
     
    Karl Groves, Apr 27, 2004
    #13
  14. "Karl Groves" <> wrote in message
    news:c6meg9$f60$...
    >
    > "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > "Karl Groves" <> wrote in message
    > > news:c6md4e$efi$...
    > > >
    > > > "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:...
    > > > > Thanks to all for your help. Italics it is. All revised and and

    > > validates
    > > > as
    > > > > XHTML strict.
    > > > >
    > > > > Kelwin
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > Who are you talking to?
    > > > Please quote when you reply.
    > > >
    > > > -karl

    > >
    > > Well, I thought that "all for your help" was pretty clear because that's

    > all
    > > there is in this thread, but then yours is not the first rude post in

    this
    > > thread, either.
    > >

    >
    > First day on Usenet, huh?
    >
    > -Karl
    >


    Nah, I just never get used to the idea that there are some people everywhere
    with nothing better to do than practice their best riff of boorish.

    Kelwin
     
    Kelwin Delaunay, Apr 27, 2004
    #14
  15. Kelwin Delaunay

    Karl Groves Guest

    "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Karl Groves" <> wrote in message
    > news:c6meg9$f60$...
    > >
    > > "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > >
    > > > "Karl Groves" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:c6md4e$efi$...
    > > > >
    > > > > "Kelwin Delaunay" <> wrote in message
    > > > > news:...
    > > > > > Thanks to all for your help. Italics it is. All revised and and
    > > > validates
    > > > > as
    > > > > > XHTML strict.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Kelwin
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > Who are you talking to?
    > > > > Please quote when you reply.
    > > > >
    > > > > -karl
    > > >
    > > > Well, I thought that "all for your help" was pretty clear because

    that's
    > > all
    > > > there is in this thread, but then yours is not the first rude post in

    > this
    > > > thread, either.
    > > >

    > >
    > > First day on Usenet, huh?
    > >
    > > -Karl
    > >

    >
    > Nah, I just never get used to the idea that there are some people

    everywhere
    > with nothing better to do than practice their best riff of boorish.


    At least you're quoting properly now.

    -Karl
     
    Karl Groves, Apr 27, 2004
    #15
  16. Kelwin Delaunay

    Mark Parnell Guest

    On Tue, 27 Apr 2004 16:38:22 -0400, "Karl Groves"
    <> declared in alt.html:

    > At least you're quoting properly now.


    Except for the bit about trimming it down to only the necessary bits.
    But then, you're not doing that either, Karl. :)

    --
    Mark Parnell
    http://www.clarkecomputers.com.au
     
    Mark Parnell, Apr 28, 2004
    #16
  17. Kelwin Delaunay

    Karl Groves Guest

    "Mark Parnell" <> wrote in message
    news:vzyf5a5fsn92.1t1bia74eb3u9$...
    > On Tue, 27 Apr 2004 16:38:22 -0400, "Karl Groves"
    > <> declared in alt.html:
    >
    > > At least you're quoting properly now.

    >
    > Except for the bit about trimming it down to only the necessary bits.
    > But then, you're not doing that either, Karl. :)


    'tis true!
    I got a bad habit of that.
    Eric Meyer even yelled at me for that once! ;-)

    -Karl
     
    Karl Groves, Apr 28, 2004
    #17
  18. Kelwin Delaunay

    Mark Parnell Guest

    On Tue, 27 Apr 2004 20:19:59 -0400, "Karl Groves"
    <> declared in alt.html:

    > Eric Meyer even yelled at me for that once! ;-)


    Ooh, a claim to fame!

    --
    Mark Parnell
    http://www.clarkecomputers.com.au
     
    Mark Parnell, Apr 28, 2004
    #18
  19. Kelwin Delaunay

    greatbigmassive

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    What on earth is wrong with some of you people?
    The poor guy asked a really simple question. Can you underline text in XHTML strict anymore, because you COULD in HTML using the u tag.

    So the answers are either.. "Yes you can, with THIS tag..." or "No you can't, but the work-around is THIS..".

    The problem with some of you guys is that you're so lost in your techy world that you forget that sometimes the simplest answer is necessary and your junk-heaped replied just cause complication.

    An underline CAN or can be used to emphasise text that has a special meaning compared to it's normally non-emphasised equivalent. The problem in HTML is that hyperlinks are defaulted to underlined so there may be a slight confusion.

    BUT, (But) let's not forget that by default, hyperlinks are bright blue. So if you underline your normal text, people shouldn't be getting it confused with your default bright blue underlined hyperlink. If your underlined text is getting mixed up with your hyperlinks then that's just bad design by the developer because they've been changing colours.

    Yes, italic is apparently the "best" way to emphasise text, but you will find lots of different opinions on this by academics. There is even the suggest that italic and underlined emphasis can have two different types of meaning.

    But hey!, let's not get complicated.
    If you want your emphasis to look underlined and not italic just use the EM tag and inside it but the class 'underline'.

    Code:
    <em class='underline'>My emphasised word</em>
    Then, as mentioned, created a class .underlined and apply appropriate text-decoration.
    That way it's coded correctly in the sense that HTML identifies this word as emphasis and it also means you get to paint it how you want.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2009
    greatbigmassive, Sep 16, 2009
    #19
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