Int & Fix Functions

Discussion in 'ASP General' started by RN1, Dec 22, 2007.

  1. RN1

    RN1 Guest

    The book I am referring to learn ASP states the following about the
    Int & Fix VBScript Maths functions:

    =========================================
    Both Int & Fix return the integer portion of the number but the
    difference lies in handling negative numbers. Int returns the first
    integer lesser than or equal to the number whereas Fix returns the
    first integer greater than or equal to the number.
    =========================================

    I guess using the term "integer portion" would have been more
    appropriate than the term "first integer", isn't it?

    Nevertheless, isn't the difference stated above wrong to some extent?
    This is because the output of passing a negative number to the Int
    function (assuming that the number is a decimal/floating point number
    & that all the integers after the decimal point are not 0) will ALWAYS
    be LESSER than the integer portion of the negative number; the output
    will NEVER be EQUAL to the negative number. For e.g. both

    Int(-61.0003)

    &

    Int(-61.9999)

    will return -62 which is LESSER than the integer portion of both
    -61.0003 & -61.9999; it won't return -61 which is EQUAL to the integer
    portion of both the negative numbers -61.0003 & -61.9999. Of course

    Int(-61.0000)

    &

    Int(-61)

    will return -61.

    Also the output of passing a negative number to the Fix function (be
    it a decimal/floating point number or a whole number) will ALWAYS be
    EQUAL to the integer portion of the negative number; its output will
    NEVER be GREATER than the integer portion of the negative number. For
    e.g.

    Fix(-61.0003)

    Fix(-61.9999)

    Fix(-61.0000)

    &

    Fix(-61)

    will return -61 which is EQUAL to the integer portion of the 4
    negative numbers; it won't return -60 which is GREATER than the
    integer portion of the 4 negative numbers.

    Please correct me if I am wrong.

    Thanks,

    Ron
    RN1, Dec 22, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. RN1

    Evertjan. Guest

    RN1 wrote on 22 dec 2007 in microsoft.public.inetserver.asp.general:

    > The book I am referring to learn ASP states the following about the
    > Int & Fix VBScript Maths functions:
    >
    > =========================================
    > Both Int & Fix return the integer portion of the number but the
    > difference lies in handling negative numbers. Int returns the first
    > integer lesser than or equal to the number whereas Fix returns the


    Must be a badly written book.

    Methinks "less than" would do:

    "5.2 being less than the integer 6, is even lesser than 5.3" ????????


    > first integer greater than or equal to the number.
    > =========================================
    >
    > I guess using the term "integer portion" would have been more
    > appropriate than the term "first integer", isn't it?


    No, "integer portion", though it gives a nice feeling, is only logical if
    the numeric value is described as a string.

    Any non integer real number has a "first integer" on "both sides" of it's
    value.

    MS-scripting reference 5.6 says:

    "The difference between Int and Fix is that if number is negative, Int
    returns the first negative integer less than or equal to number, whereas
    Fix returns the first negative integer greater than or equal to number. For
    example, Int converts -8.4 to -9, and Fix converts -8.4 to -8."

    ========================================
    So int() returns the first integer value "less than",

    while fix() returns the firrst integer value "nearer to zero".
    ========================================

    > Nevertheless, isn't the difference stated above wrong to some extent?
    > This is because the output of passing a negative number to the Int
    > function (assuming that the number is a decimal/floating point number


    A "decimal number" in my book is just a way [11]
    of writing a number to a string,
    as it could also be a written as an octal [13]
    or hexadecimal
    or binary number [111],
    or written "exponentially" [1.1e1] [.11e2]
    or "scientific" [11e0] .

    Yes, I know that a non integer number, when written decimaly, has numbers
    right of the integer/fractional devision sign which are wrongly called
    decimal figures.

    A "floating point number" is a way of internally storing a number with
    a mantissa and an exponent.

    An integer can be, and with ASP-VBS is, stored as a floating point number!!

    So let us say "non integer number".

    > & that all the integers after the decimal point


    "integers after a decimal point"?
    Do you mean "single figures" after ...
    A integer being a numeric value.

    > are not 0) will ALWAYS


    0) ????

    > be LESSER than the integer portion of the negative number; the output


    .... always be LESS than ...

    > will NEVER be EQUAL to the negative number.


    Why not?

    Int(-61) is just -61

    > r e.g. both
    >
    > Int(-61.0003)
    >
    > &
    >
    > Int(-61.9999)
    >
    > will return -62 which is LESSER than the integer portion of both
    > -61.0003 & -61.9999;


    LESS

    > it won't return -61 which is EQUAL to the integer
    > portion of both the negative numbers -61.0003 & -61.9999. Of course


    So do not use this silly notion of "integer portion"


    > Int(-61.0000)
    >
    > &
    >
    > Int(-61)
    >
    > will return -61.


    Not exactly! Only in effext.

    Do not mingle a numberic value as used by the computer,
    with the way it is written as a litteral string in a source code.

    ===

    What does the interpreting code with:

    result = Int(-61.0000)

    It first takes the litteral string -61.0000 and converts it to -61 and
    [with asp-vbscript] stores that as a binary floating point coded value

    Then the int() is applies to that value of -61,
    returning -61.

    ===

    What does the interpreting code with:

    result = Int(-61)

    It first takes the litteral string -61 and converts it to -61 and [with
    asp-vbscript] stores that as a binary floating point coded value

    Then the int() is applies to that value of -61,
    returning -61.

    ===

    Then this result in both cases is applied to a variable called "result" and
    stored again coded as a binary floating point.


    >
    > Also the output of passing a negative number to the Fix function (be
    > it a decimal/floating point number or a whole number) will ALWAYS be
    > EQUAL to the integer portion of the negative number; its output will
    > NEVER be GREATER than the integer portion of the negative number. For
    > e.g.
    >
    > Fix(-61.0003)
    >
    > Fix(-61.9999)
    >
    > Fix(-61.0000)
    >
    > &
    >
    > Fix(-61)
    >
    > will return -61 which is EQUAL to the integer portion of the 4
    > negative numbers; it won't return -60 which is GREATER than the
    > integer portion of the 4 negative numbers.
    >
    > Please correct me if I am wrong.


    Dear Ron, never, never again mix number values and the way they are stored
    internally, with the way they are written as a string litteral [and only
    then depend on the number base].

    To show you that input and output string litterals
    are not per definition so simple, try:

    <%
    Response.write fix(-int(6e3) + .5) & "<br>"
    Response.write hex(-int(6e3))
    %>

    Can you deduct with reasoning what the outup will be?

    [answer below]










































    -5999
    FFFFE890

    --
    Evertjan.
    The Netherlands.
    (Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
    Evertjan., Dec 22, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. RN1

    Evertjan. Guest

    Dave Anderson wrote on 22 dec 2007 in
    microsoft.public.inetserver.asp.general:

    > "Evertjan." "wrote":
    >> ========================================
    >> So int() returns the first integer value "less than",
    >>
    >> while fix() returns the first integer value "nearer to zero".
    >> ========================================

    >
    > You left off equality.


    Add: "if not integer already" to both.

    >
    >
    >> A "decimal number" in my book is just a way [11]
    >> of writing a number to a string,
    >> as it could also be a written as an octal [13]
    >> or hexadecimal
    >> or binary number [111],
    >> or written "exponentially" [1.1e1] [.11e2]
    >> or "scientific" [11e0] .

    >
    > Those last two are decimal examples.


    Yes.

    How would you call this: 3.256
    fractional?


    --
    Evertjan.
    The Netherlands.
    (Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
    Evertjan., Dec 22, 2007
    #3
  4. RN1

    Evertjan. Guest

    Dave Anderson wrote on 22 dec 2007 in
    microsoft.public.inetserver.asp.general:

    > "Evertjan." wrote:
    >> How would you call this: 3.256
    >> fractional?

    >
    > Rational, representing 3256/1000.


    No, we were talking about ways to display numbers.

    Rational numbers are a mathematic collection.

    > Of course, in many countries, that is just 3256, right?


    Sorry?

    --
    Evertjan.
    The Netherlands.
    (Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
    Evertjan., Dec 22, 2007
    #4
  5. RN1

    Evertjan. Guest

    Dave Anderson wrote on 24 dec 2007 in
    microsoft.public.inetserver.asp.general:

    >> Rational numbers are a mathematic collection.

    >
    > You asked what I would call it. It's not my problem if you don't like my
    > answer.


    What is this with you, this is not a personal venetta?



    --
    Evertjan.
    The Netherlands.
    (Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
    Evertjan., Dec 24, 2007
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Xah Lee
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    1,108
    Tim Roberts
    Mar 21, 2006
  2. Schnoffos
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,198
    Martien Verbruggen
    Jun 27, 2003
  3. Hal Styli
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    1,615
    Old Wolf
    Jan 20, 2004
  4. Xah Lee
    Replies:
    23
    Views:
    1,047
    Tim Roberts
    Mar 21, 2006
  5. Xah Lee
    Replies:
    21
    Views:
    766
    Tim Roberts
    Mar 21, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page