Interface help

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Neal, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. Neal

    Neal Guest

    On Tue, 05 Oct 2004 04:19:15 GMT, BM <> wrote:

    > Is there anyway to take a link like this:
    >
    > "<a href="file:apps/Firefox.exe">"
    >
    > and make it a command to run the exe instead of HTML's default of
    > downloading the exe?


    How file types are handled is up to the UA. The author really has no
    control over that.
     
    Neal, Oct 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. Neal

    BM Guest

    Hello Everyone -

    1st time visitor, 1st time poster, and well pretty much 1st time coder.
    I have tried things in the past but nothing special ever came out.
    I'm a computer tech by trade, I can solve your computer issues, but I'm
    not a natural coder. But I am inspired to create an interface in HTML
    for an install CD I am making.

    Is there anyway to take a link like this:

    "<a href="file:apps/Firefox.exe">"

    and make it a command to run the exe instead of HTML's default of
    downloading the exe?

    I have looked for 2 days to find some way of doing this, and I guess
    being so new/incredibly unnatural at this I'm running out of ideas and
    angles to consider. I'm willing to learn a scripting trick or two to
    get this to do what I want.

    I don't have this posted on a web-site since I am using it to be the GUI
    for a CD. Also, I am using an icon to launch the application, if that
    effects any of your thought processes.

    Thanks for your help.

    Bill
     
    BM, Oct 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. Neal

    BM Guest

    Neal wrote:

    > On Tue, 05 Oct 2004 04:19:15 GMT, BM <> wrote:
    >
    >> Is there anyway to take a link like this:
    >>
    >> "<a href="file:apps/Firefox.exe">"
    >>
    >> and make it a command to run the exe instead of HTML's default of
    >> downloading the exe?

    >
    >
    > How file types are handled is up to the UA. The author really has no
    > control over that.


    Forgive my lack of knowledge ... UA?
     
    BM, Oct 5, 2004
    #3
  4. Neal

    Mark Parnell Guest

    On Tue, 05 Oct 2004 04:27:22 GMT, BM <> declared
    in alt.html:

    > Forgive my lack of knowledge ... UA?


    User-Agent. Usually a browser, e.g. Internet Explorer, Mozilla, Opera...

    --
    Mark Parnell
    http://www.clarkecomputers.com.au
    "Never drink rum&coke whilst reading usenet" - rf 2004
     
    Mark Parnell, Oct 5, 2004
    #4
  5. Neal

    rf Guest

    BM wrote:

    > Neal wrote:
    >
    > >> "<a href="file:apps/Firefox.exe">"


    > > How file types are handled is up to the UA. The author really has no
    > > control over that.

    >
    > Forgive my lack of knowledge ... UA?


    User Agent. The users browser.

    However I don't think this is an issue as yet since you can not start a
    browser this way. Indeed you need the browser to already be running so as to
    process the <a> element above, assuming somebody fires it - catch 22.

    What you probably want to do is to launch the html file containing the GUI's
    default page, index.html for example, when the CD is stuffed into the cup
    holder. You launch the data file, it is up to the OS to select (via file
    associations) the program to process this file (the users default browser).

    In the root of your CD install a file called autorun.inf

    Inside this file:

    [autorun]
    shellexecute=index.html

    That's it. The operating system does the rest. assuming it is Windows and
    that you have IE5 or higher installed and assuming you have autorun enabled
    for the CD drive and assuming the html file class associates to a browser of
    some description.

    BTW you *can* use this method to run a copy of firefox you have secreted on
    the CD but don't. A brand new browser presented to the viewer is not only an
    affront but might confuse them enouth to toss the CD :) You might also be
    breaching copyright.

    --
    Cheers
    Richard.
     
    rf, Oct 5, 2004
    #5
  6. Neal

    WebcastMaker Guest

    In article <7hp8d.4355$Sl2.1979@trnddc09>,
    says...
    > Is there anyway to take a link like this:
    > "<a href="file:apps/Firefox.exe">"


    Yes there is a way to run an executable, but it requires activeX and
    permission from the browser. It is generally not done except by web
    applications known to be safe on an intranet.
    --
    WebcastMaker
    Webcasting for free
    http://www.webentations.com
    http://www.webcastmaker.com (CBT)
     
    WebcastMaker, Oct 5, 2004
    #6
  7. Neal

    brucie Guest

    brucie, Oct 5, 2004
    #7
  8. rf wrote:
    > BM wrote:
    >
    >>>>"<a href="file:apps/Firefox.exe">"

    >
    > BTW you *can* use this method to run a copy of firefox you have secreted on
    > the CD but don't. A brand new browser presented to the viewer is not only an
    > affront but might confuse them enouth to toss the CD :) You might also be
    > breaching copyright.


    Er, where would the copyright breach be? Firefox is free (speech)
    software: <http://www.mozilla.org/MPL/>.
     
    Leif K-Brooks, Oct 5, 2004
    #8
  9. Neal

    rf Guest

    Leif K-Brooks wrote:

    > rf wrote:
    > >
    > > BTW you *can* use this method to run a copy of firefox you have secreted

    on
    > > the CD but don't. A brand new browser presented to the viewer is not

    only an
    > > affront but might confuse them enouth to toss the CD :) You might also

    be
    > > breaching copyright.

    >
    > Er, where would the copyright breach be? Firefox is free (speech)
    > software: <http://www.mozilla.org/MPL/>.


    Just because it is free does not mean that you can do what you want with it,
    like distribute it on your very own CD. The people who wrote Firefox still
    hold copyright to that piece of work. They may just, under the GNU licence
    scheme, insist that it be downloaded from their own site. I don't know,
    never been there, but one does have to be careful when writing things to a
    CD.

    Only if an author has stated up front and quite clearly that a piece of
    software is in the public domain is it "free" and "free to do with what you
    want".

    Also take IE as an example. IE is free but not under GNU. You may download
    it from their site. However you are most certainly in breach of their
    copyright if you distribute IE yourself. Even a tiny little bit if of it,
    like mshtml.dll. Microsoft state this quite clearly and up front in their
    documentation. You may install IE6 over what you have but *only from
    microsoft.com* or somebody who is licenced by them as an oem.

    Think very carefully about copyright. It is more encompassing that you might
    imagine.

    --
    Cheers
    Richard.
     
    rf, Oct 5, 2004
    #9
  10. Neal

    Neal Guest

    On Tue, 05 Oct 2004 06:20:45 -0400, Leif K-Brooks <>
    wrote:

    > rf wrote:
    >> BM wrote:
    >>
    >>>>> "<a href="file:apps/Firefox.exe">"

    >>
    >> BTW you *can* use this method to run a copy of firefox you have
    >> secreted on
    >> the CD but don't. A brand new browser presented to the viewer is not
    >> only an
    >> affront but might confuse them enouth to toss the CD :) You might also
    >> be
    >> breaching copyright.

    >
    > Er, where would the copyright breach be? Firefox is free (speech)
    > software: <http://www.mozilla.org/MPL/>.


    Free use != public domain. Read the terms of service before you do
    anything with free software - in most cases, the free use is limited to a
    set of circumstances.

    Whether this applies to the Firefox TOS I don't know, haven't read it
    through.
     
    Neal, Oct 5, 2004
    #10
  11. rf wrote:
    > Leif K-Brooks wrote:
    >
    >>rf wrote:
    >>
    >>> BTW you *can* use this method to run a copy of firefox you have secreted
    >>> on the CD but don't. A brand new browser presented to the viewer is not
    >>> only an ffront but might confuse them enouth to toss the CD :) You might
    >>> also be breaching copyright.

    >>
    >>Er, where would the copyright breach be? Firefox is free (speech)
    >>software: <http://www.mozilla.org/MPL/>.

    >
    >
    > Just because it is free does not mean that you can do what you want with it,
    > like distribute it on your very own CD. The people who wrote Firefox still
    > hold copyright to that piece of work. They may just, under the GNU licence
    > scheme, insist that it be downloaded from their own site. I don't know,
    > never been there, but one does have to be careful when writing things to a
    > CD.
    >
    > Only if an author has stated up front and quite clearly that a piece of
    > software is in the public domain is it "free" and "free to do with what you
    > want".


    I think we're running into the good old freedom-versus-price
    misunderstanding here. Free software is a term used by an organization
    called the Free Software Foundation (<http://fsf.org/>) to mean software
    which is developed under a license giving the user certain freedoms. The
    FSF maintains a list of freedoms required of the licenses free software
    is distributed under (<http://www.fsf.org/philosophy/free-sw.html>), one
    of which is "The freedom to redistribute copies [...]."

    The MPL (and the MPL-LGPL-GPL tri-license), which Firefox is distributed
    under, is a free software license (see
    <http://www.fsf.org/licenses/license-list.html#MPL>), so we already know
    that it provides the freedom to redistribute. But to be thorough, here's
    an excerpt from the MPL on the subject:

    You may distribute Covered Code in Executable form only if the
    requirements of Section 3.1-3.5 have been met for that Covered Code,
    and if You include a notice stating that the Source Code version of
    the Covered Code is available under the terms of this License,
    including a description of how and where You have fulfilled the
    obligations of Section 3.2.

    Sections 3.1-3.5 aren't massive restrictions by any means; the OP could
    easily comply with them if he wanted to.

    By the way, where did you get the idea that the GPL (that is what you
    mean by "GNU license," right?) requires code to be downloaded from the
    original developer's Web site? It's also a free software license (a very
    prominent one), and it doesn't have any such draconian restrictions.
     
    Leif K-Brooks, Oct 5, 2004
    #11
  12. Neal

    Toby Inkster Guest

    rf wrote:

    > They may just, under the GNU licence scheme, insist that it be
    > downloaded from their own site.


    Have you really never read the GPL?

    If they did what you subscribed they would be in violation of their own
    licence agreement.

    > Also take IE as an example. IE is free but not under GNU. You may
    > download it from their site. However you are most certainly in breach of
    > their copyright if you distribute IE yourself.


    On the contrary, IE's licence has always been very relaxed when it came to
    unmodified distribution. That's partly how IE became so widespread in the
    early days -- ISP CDs, magazine cover CDs, etc could include MSIE for free
    without having to wade through lots of red tape.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Oct 5, 2004
    #12
  13. Neal

    BM Guest

    brucie wrote:
    > In alt.html WebcastMaker said:
    >
    >
    >>Yes there is a way to run an executable, but it requires activeX

    >
    >
    > http://www.whirlywiryweb.com/article.asp?id=/launchinie
    >


    Thank you everybody for your input. To be honest I'm not one to do
    activeX for anything. I am so anti-IE it isn't funny.

    I seem to recall back a few years ago, when I was at a call center that
    my buddy and I wrote batch files that launched applications. Sadly it
    has been so long that I have forgotten how to do that. There was some
    trick to the single line batch script. and I know I did a simple HTML
    page for that as well.

    Once I can get that figured out I'm ALL for an autorun script.

    Thanks again. And if I popped something to surface in your mids in this
    last message please feel free to reply.

    Regards,

    Bill
     
    BM, Oct 6, 2004
    #13
  14. Neal

    brucie Guest

    In alt.html BM said:

    > I seem to recall back a few years ago, when I was at a call center that
    > my buddy and I wrote batch files that launched applications. Sadly it
    > has been so long that I have forgotten how to do that.


    you cant launch executables from a browser[1] without adjusting each
    browsers giggly security bits. if it was possible you'd end up with
    situations like every second site run by a teen full of angst formatting
    your HDD.


    [1] we just pretend IE hasn't had a security hole for 3 years that does
    let you.

    --
    l i t t l e v o i c e s m a k e m e
     
    brucie, Oct 6, 2004
    #14
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