Interview Questions

Discussion in 'C++' started by Jatinder, May 14, 2004.

  1. Jatinder

    Jatinder Guest

    I 'm a professional looking for the job.In interview these questions
    were asked with some others which I answered.But some of them left
    unanswered.Plz help.

    Here are some questions on C/C++, OS internals?
    Q1 . What is the use of pointer to an array?
    Q2 . What is the use of array of pointers?
    Q3 . What is the use of pointer to function ?
    Q4 . How to print through serial port? What is Flow Control(Xon,Xoff)
    ?
    Q5 . What is IOCTL Explain .
    Q6 . How to create an interrupt service routine in C?
    Q7 . What are the internals of a schedular ?
    Q8 . The static variables are declared in heap or stack ?
     
    Jatinder, May 14, 2004
    #1
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  2. Jatinder

    Ron Natalie Guest

    "Jatinder" <> wrote in message news:...

    > Q1 . What is the use of pointer to an array?
    > Q2 . What is the use of array of pointers?
    > Q3 . What is the use of pointer to function ?


    These are almost topical, but if you can't answer them, you need to go back and read
    a C text book.

    > Q4 . How to print through serial port? What is Flow Control(Xon,Xoff)
    > Q5 . What is IOCTL Explain .


    Highly system dependent and off-topic. Ask im comp.programming.unix or whatever
    target system you're dealing with.

    > Q6 . How to create an interrupt service routine in C?


    Ditto.

    > Q7 . What are the internals of a schedular ?


    What scheduler? Did they mention what OS (and just saying UNIX doesn't cut it)
    they want to know about the scheduler internals of?

    > Q8 . The static variables are declared in heap or stack ?


    Neither.
     
    Ron Natalie, May 14, 2004
    #2
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  3. Jatinder wrote:
    > I 'm a professional looking for the job.In interview these questions
    > were asked with some others which I answered.But some of them left
    > unanswered.Plz help.
    >
    > Here are some questions on C/C++, OS internals?
    > Q1 . What is the use of pointer to an array?

    One can iterate through the array using a pointer.
    One can pass the location of an element by just passing the pointer.
    The array can be allocated during run-time, especially when the
    size is unknown at run-time.

    > Q2 . What is the use of array of pointers?

    Multi-dimensional array.
    Allows polymorphism for families of classes.
    A convenient container for objects allocated during run-time.

    > Q3 . What is the use of pointer to function ?

    One can have an object associated with a function to process
    that object, such as factories.
    Another use is to map menu items with functions to process the
    selection.
    Allows for more generic algorithms, such as qsort (which allows
    a pointer to a comparison function).

    > Q4 . How to print through serial port? What is Flow Control(Xon,Xoff)
    > ?

    This depends on the platform and maybe the Operating System.
    The "best" way to print through a serial port is to use operating
    system functions.
    The Flow Control characters, Xon and Xoff, are one method to turn
    on (resume) or pause (stop) transmission across the serial channel.
    See also ETX, STX, Request To Send (RTS) and DTS.

    > Q5 . What is IOCTL Explain .

    I believe this is a platform specific structure containing details
    about an I/O device.

    > Q6 . How to create an interrupt service routine in C?

    This requires notifying your compiler that a function is an
    ISR.

    > Q7 . What are the internals of a schedular ?

    Depends on the platform and operating system. Fundamentally,
    a schedular dispatches processes according to a given scheme,
    schedule or algorithm.

    > Q8 . The static variables are declared in heap or stack ?

    Neither, as the _standard_ C language does not require an
    implementation to have a stack or heap. On many implementations
    that use a heap and stack, static variables are not declared
    on the stack or heap. They are allocated in the same area
    as global variables. But this depends on the implementation.


    --
    Thomas Matthews

    C++ newsgroup welcome message:
    http://www.slack.net/~shiva/welcome.txt
    C++ Faq: http://www.parashift.com/c -faq-lite
    C Faq: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/c-faq/top.html
    alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++ faq:
    http://www.raos.demon.uk/acllc-c /faq.html
    Other sites:
    http://www.josuttis.com -- C++ STL Library book
     
    Thomas Matthews, May 14, 2004
    #3
  4. Jatinder

    Xenos Guest

    "Jatinder" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I 'm a professional looking for the job.In interview these questions
    > were asked with some others which I answered.But some of them left
    > unanswered.Plz help.
    >
    > Here are some questions on C/C++, OS internals?
    > Q1 . What is the use of pointer to an array?
    > Q2 . What is the use of array of pointers?
    > Q3 . What is the use of pointer to function ?
    > Q4 . How to print through serial port? What is Flow Control(Xon,Xoff)
    > ?
    > Q5 . What is IOCTL Explain .
    > Q6 . How to create an interrupt service routine in C?
    > Q7 . What are the internals of a schedular ?
    > Q8 . The static variables are declared in heap or stack ?


    I find it alarming that this trend of giving ridiculous quizzes and tests to
    interviewee is increasing. When I was young and looking for a job,
    companies that did this were few. I immediately walked out of any interview
    were I was asked to take such a test. Regurgitation of facts does not prove
    knowledge or wisdom, and is certainly no indication of skill. For someone
    with an encyclopedic memory of the C or C++ standards, I would hire for a
    one-time fee of $18--the amount I would need to just purchase a copy of the
    standard (or whatever it currently costs).

    This topic has come up before, and I think I said pretty much the something.
    Someone replied with, "So how do you know they can do the job?" Well, there
    are no guarantees, but you could try *talking* to them. I never minded
    being asked questions in interviews. Isn't that a major part of the
    process? Ask about college courses taken and projects done. If you are
    interviewing an experienced professional, ask about previous work done. How
    about what problems were encountered and how they were overcome. DON'T try
    and sitting me in a room with 50 other nameless applicants and presume to
    give me a test. That's a company interested in bodies and tests scores, not
    cultivating good people. I'm also turned off by companies that call you up
    and ask for college transcripts. Unless they have taken the time to
    interview me and show an interest in hiring me, I always refused.

    As a result, I love the company I work for. They treat me very well, and
    there is always very smart, experienced people to learn from.

    DrX
     
    Xenos, May 14, 2004
    #4
  5. Jatinder

    Derek Guest

    Xenos wrote:
    > I find it alarming that this trend of giving ridiculous
    > quizzes and tests to interviewee is increasing. When I
    > was young and looking for a job, companies that did this
    > were few. I immediately walked out of any interview were
    > I was asked to take such a test. Regurgitation of facts
    > does not prove knowledge or wisdom, and is certainly no
    > indication of skill. For someone with an encyclopedic
    > memory of the C or C++ standards, I would hire for a
    > one-time fee of $18--the amount I would need to just
    > purchase a copy of the standard (or whatever it currently
    > costs).


    In general I agree with you. However, the questions
    mentioned by the original poster may not be the whole
    of the interview. For all you know they are just a
    pre-screening and the answers should be no-brainers for
    qualified applicants. My current employer took a lot of
    time to get to know me, but only after I took a couple of
    short written tests to make sure I was a C++ developer and
    not a Perl hacker looking to learn C++ on the job.

    When the economy isn't so hot there may be many applicants
    for each position and some form of pre-selection may be
    justified.
     
    Derek, May 14, 2004
    #5
  6. Derek wrote:
    > Xenos wrote:
    > > I find it alarming that this trend of giving ridiculous
    > > quizzes and tests to interviewee is increasing. When I
    > > was young and looking for a job, companies that did this
    > > were few. I immediately walked out of any interview were
    > > I was asked to take such a test. Regurgitation of facts
    > > does not prove knowledge or wisdom, and is certainly no
    > > indication of skill. For someone with an encyclopedic
    > > memory of the C or C++ standards, I would hire for a
    > > one-time fee of $18--the amount I would need to just
    > > purchase a copy of the standard (or whatever it currently
    > > costs).

    >
    > In general I agree with you. However, the questions
    > mentioned by the original poster may not be the whole
    > of the interview. For all you know they are just a
    > pre-screening and the answers should be no-brainers for
    > qualified applicants. My current employer took a lot of
    > time to get to know me, but only after I took a couple of
    > short written tests to make sure I was a C++ developer and
    > not a Perl hacker looking to learn C++ on the job.


    Shouldn't that be obvious from the resume? When employers are
    being picky about whom to interview, they should put more
    emphasis on reading the application documents and doing phone
    screenings. Well, just MHO, of course. All OT, BTW. :)

    V
     
    Victor Bazarov, May 14, 2004
    #6
  7. Jatinder

    Xenos Guest

    "Derek" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In general I agree with you. However, the questions
    > mentioned by the original poster may not be the whole
    > of the interview. For all you know they are just a
    > pre-screening and the answers should be no-brainers for
    > qualified applicants. My current employer took a lot of
    > time to get to know me, but only after I took a couple of
    > short written tests to make sure I was a C++ developer and
    > not a Perl hacker looking to learn C++ on the job.
    >

    And that's fine. I wouldn't have minded that. But I have gone to
    interviews where they didn't even interview you. *Every* applicant had the
    same "interview" time. We were herded into a class room to take a length
    test. No one every said "hello," and they only asked your name to check it
    off a list. THAT is not a company I would have liked to work for. I left
    and have never regretted it. Of course, in today economy I guess you may
    have to swallow your pride a little more and suck it up. I feel sorry for
    kids just out of college (and older folks out of work). In my day, lots of
    good companies would fight over you.

    DrX
     
    Xenos, May 14, 2004
    #7
  8. Jatinder

    bartek Guest

    "Xenos" <> wrote in
    news:c8328f$:

    >
    > "Derek" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> In general I agree with you. However, the questions
    >> mentioned by the original poster may not be the whole
    >> of the interview. For all you know they are just a
    >> pre-screening and the answers should be no-brainers for
    >> qualified applicants. My current employer took a lot of
    >> time to get to know me, but only after I took a couple of
    >> short written tests to make sure I was a C++ developer and
    >> not a Perl hacker looking to learn C++ on the job.
    >>

    > And that's fine. I wouldn't have minded that. But I have gone to
    > interviews where they didn't even interview you. *Every* applicant
    > had the same "interview" time. We were herded into a class room to
    > take a length test. No one every said "hello," and they only asked
    > your name to check it off a list. THAT is not a company I would have
    > liked to work for. I left and have never regretted it. Of course, in
    > today economy I guess you may have to swallow your pride a little more
    > and suck it up. I feel sorry for kids just out of college (and older
    > folks out of work). In my day, lots of good companies would fight
    > over you.


    It's the sign of the times, isn't it?
    Companies that actually care about their workforce are getting pretty
    rare. Now it's the quantity that counts, not quality. Quality is just
    such a waste of resources, just go ask the marketing people.

    I wouldn't be surprised, if they actually started charging entry fees for
    interview sessions.

    Sorry, I couldn't resist...

    --
    :: bartekd [at] o2 [dot] pl
     
    bartek, May 14, 2004
    #8
  9. Jatinder

    Howard Guest

    Anyone else notice something strange about this post? I see it comes
    through San Diego State University's server (newshub.sdsu.edu). Also, the
    OP has not responded in any way, with their own opinions, follow-up, or
    whatever. And the OP claims to be a "professional", but asks some of the
    most basic questions. Isn't anyone at least suspicious that this is really
    just a student taking a test or doing homework, and trying to get free
    answers to questions they're supposed to either know or research themselves?
    This is at least the third time I've seen someone declare they were asking
    "job interview" questions, yet it seemed suspiciously like schoolwork to me.
    Am I just being paranoid, or what?

    -Howard
     
    Howard, May 14, 2004
    #9
  10. Jatinder

    Xenos Guest

    "Howard" <> wrote in message
    news:z_8pc.58344$...
    > Am I just being paranoid, or what?


    No, you are probably on to something...
     
    Xenos, May 14, 2004
    #10
  11. Howard wrote:
    > Anyone else notice something strange about this post? I see it comes
    > through San Diego State University's server (newshub.sdsu.edu). Also, the
    > OP has not responded in any way, with their own opinions, follow-up, or
    > whatever. And the OP claims to be a "professional", but asks some of the
    > most basic questions. Isn't anyone at least suspicious that this is really
    > just a student taking a test or doing homework, and trying to get free
    > answers to questions they're supposed to either know or research themselves?
    > This is at least the third time I've seen someone declare they were asking
    > "job interview" questions, yet it seemed suspiciously like schoolwork to me.
    > Am I just being paranoid, or what?


    Yes
     
    Victor Bazarov, May 14, 2004
    #11
  12. Jatinder

    Walter Guest

    "Victor Bazarov" <> wrote in message
    news:1_7pc.178$...
    > > In general I agree with you. However, the questions
    > > mentioned by the original poster may not be the whole
    > > of the interview. For all you know they are just a
    > > pre-screening and the answers should be no-brainers for
    > > qualified applicants. My current employer took a lot of
    > > time to get to know me, but only after I took a couple of
    > > short written tests to make sure I was a C++ developer and
    > > not a Perl hacker looking to learn C++ on the job.

    >
    > Shouldn't that be obvious from the resume? When employers are
    > being picky about whom to interview, they should put more
    > emphasis on reading the application documents and doing phone
    > screenings. Well, just MHO, of course. All OT, BTW. :)


    You can't tell much from a resume. Most resumes read like the applicant
    walks on water. When they list 5 years of C experience, but can't answer a
    few simple questions about C, it's an easy way to separate out the real
    candidates from the charlatans.

    One of the best ways to interview is ask them to bring in a sample of some
    programming work they wrote that they're proud of. Then have them walk you
    through it and explain it.
     
    Walter, May 15, 2004
    #12
  13. Jatinder

    Walter Guest

    "Howard" <> wrote in message
    news:z_8pc.58344$...
    >
    > Anyone else notice something strange about this post? I see it comes
    > through San Diego State University's server (newshub.sdsu.edu). Also, the
    > OP has not responded in any way, with their own opinions, follow-up, or
    > whatever. And the OP claims to be a "professional", but asks some of the
    > most basic questions. Isn't anyone at least suspicious that this is

    really
    > just a student taking a test or doing homework, and trying to get free
    > answers to questions they're supposed to either know or research

    themselves?
    > This is at least the third time I've seen someone declare they were asking
    > "job interview" questions, yet it seemed suspiciously like schoolwork to

    me.
    > Am I just being paranoid, or what?


    LOL! I recently saw a "Dateline" episode on college cheating, where students
    would wirelessly access the internet during an exam to find answers to
    questions.
     
    Walter, May 15, 2004
    #13
  14. "Walter" <> wrote in message
    news:8cdpc.50751$z06.7204895@attbi_s01...
    >
    > "Howard" <> wrote in message
    > news:z_8pc.58344$...
    > >
    > > Anyone else notice something strange about this post? I see it comes
    > > through San Diego State University's server (newshub.sdsu.edu). Also,

    the
    > > OP has not responded in any way, with their own opinions, follow-up, or
    > > whatever. And the OP claims to be a "professional", but asks some of

    the
    > > most basic questions. Isn't anyone at least suspicious that this is

    > really
    > > just a student taking a test or doing homework, and trying to get free
    > > answers to questions they're supposed to either know or research

    > themselves?
    > > This is at least the third time I've seen someone declare they were

    asking
    > > "job interview" questions, yet it seemed suspiciously like schoolwork to

    > me.
    > > Am I just being paranoid, or what?

    >
    > LOL! I recently saw a "Dateline" episode on college cheating, where

    students
    > would wirelessly access the internet during an exam to find answers to
    > questions.


    In addition to it probably being a student, there is an issue of legality
    and prudence with a potential employer using a test to qualify candidates.
    The general thinking goes like this:
    Are the questions on the test indicative of the type of work being done?
    Would being able to answer the question determine that the candidate could
    do the work that the opening is for? Can you prove that the questions are
    normative, non-descriminatory with respect to ethnic and cultural
    differences, sex, or race? How have you qulaified the test questions such
    that they are predictive of success or failure of the candidate in
    performance of the actual expected work?

    If there is no indication of having proof of the applicability of the test
    to the specific job, and proof that the questions are actually specific to
    the position being screened for, the use of the test is illegal. In
    addition, it must be shown (by actual job situations) that the information
    required to answer the questions is necessary to be known without reference
    to generally available materials expected to be in the workplace.

    It is legal, for example, to require a doctor to pass exams that require the
    candidate to know various medical terms, procedures, and techniques without
    reference to books, notes, or collegues in order to be certified as a
    surgeon. The elements of the exam must match what a surgeon must do in
    performance of general surgery. It is not expected that a surgeon will know
    everything (even if they all think they do!) and that reference may have to
    be made prior to a specific surgery, or even during a surgery in special
    cases.

    In programming, it is highly unlikely that all aspects of each language that
    might be encountered during any given project would be known without
    references to any given programmer. That eliminates from qualifying test
    such nonesence as "Which toolbar button do you use to change the display
    icon in a project?" What might be more appropriate (but still a little
    "dicey") would be to ask "Can the display icon for a project be changed?"
    and "What is involved in changing it?"
    It is one of the disgusting aspects of the Microsoft qualifying exams for
    certification that many of their questions are of the extremely specific
    type covering topics that most programmers would simply look up when needed.
    (And I have been certified, so I know whereof I speak; MCP, MCT, MDSD, CTT.)

    I tell my students "Never memorize what you can look up." What is important
    is that they understand the principles, techniques, and what's available in,
    say, a language so they know what can be done, various options, and reasons
    for selecting one over another. What distresses me is co-workers I have had
    who have no clear understanding of what a compiler does, how the language
    they're using is structured, the differences in data types, etc. This is the
    basic stuff I always wished we had a qualified test for before hiring them.

    IBM used to use a "Programmer Apptitude Test" in the '60s which I believe
    they dropped when they were faced with legal problems trying to justify it
    as predictive of success or failure. I took it in 1961, thought it was dumb,
    and got hired anyway.
    --
    Gary
     
    Gary Labowitz, May 15, 2004
    #14
  15. Jatinder

    Walter Guest

    "Gary Labowitz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I tell my students "Never memorize what you can look up." What is

    important
    > is that they understand the principles, techniques, and what's available

    in,
    > say, a language so they know what can be done, various options, and

    reasons
    > for selecting one over another. What distresses me is co-workers I have

    had
    > who have no clear understanding of what a compiler does, how the language
    > they're using is structured, the differences in data types, etc. This is

    the
    > basic stuff I always wished we had a qualified test for before hiring

    them.

    I agree. An educated man is not someone who knows a lot of things, but one
    who knows how to find out what he needs to know. Interestingly, where I
    attended college, the typical exam was "open book, open note". You could use
    any books or notes you'd made as reference material. The idea was that the
    tests were not regurgitation of knowledge, but were designed to determine if
    you'd mastered the concepts.

    For example, in math we had a lecture where the prof derived the fourier
    transform from basic principles. On the final exam, one of the problems was
    to derive the hyperbolic transforms. If you "got" how the ft was done, doing
    the hyperbolics was straightforward. If you'd memorized formulas without
    understanding, you were going to fail. A "cheat sheet" was useless, as well.

    I no longer remember how to do a fourier transform or a hyperbolic one - but
    I came out of college with the confidence and knowledge of how to solve
    complicated problems; the subject of the problems was not relevant. And that
    ability has served me very well throughout my professional career. The
    cheaters on "Dateline" who justified their cheating by saying that only 3%
    of the knowledge learned in college is ever applied in their career have
    totally missed the point of what a college education is.
     
    Walter, May 15, 2004
    #15
  16. Jatinder

    Mabden Guest

    "Xenos" <> wrote in message
    news:c837fs$...
    >
    > "Howard" <> wrote in message
    > news:z_8pc.58344$...
    > > Am I just being paranoid, or what?

    >
    > No, you are probably on to something...
    >


    Well, enough time has passed. A student usually needs the info in a very
    short time frame, so altho I won't do homework, I might post something a
    couple of weeks later. Especially after the attention seekers have posted 10
    different answers anyway.
    <rant on>
    It's a pity there isn't some restraint on the part of professionals in
    regards to answering simple questions. I mean, how much glory is there in
    being the first person to providing the solution to an easy homework
    question, and helping someone cheat. These people are seriously in need of
    friends. Go see a movie or something.
    </rant>
     
    Mabden, May 15, 2004
    #16
  17. "Jatinder" <> wrote in message news:...

    > I 'm a professional


    I don't think so.

    > looking for the job.


    That's "a job", not "the job".

    > In interview


    That's "In an interview, ".

    > these questions were asked with some others which I answered.
    > But some of them left unanswered.


    The questions got up and left?

    > Plz help.


    Ok, I'll help you with your homework.

    > Q1 . What is the use of pointer to an array?


    It points to it. (The name of an array is also a pointer to it.)

    > Q2 . What is the use of array of pointers?


    It holds them. (std::vector is better in most cases, though.)
    Useful for lists of pointers to polymorphic derived classes.

    > Q3 . What is the use of pointer to function ?


    It points to it. (The name of a function is also a pointer to it.)
    Great for passing one procedure to a second which runs the first,
    esp. in recursive programs. Eg, this function accepts as an
    argument a pointer to any void-void function:

    int CursDirs (void Func(void)); // applies "Func" to each dir in tree

    One can then pass a function to it by name:

    void MyNiftyFunction(void) { /* do stuff */ }
    result = CursDirs(MyNiftyFunction);

    > Q4 . How to print through serial port?


    Most computers use parallel ports for that.

    > What is Flow Control(Xon,Xoff)


    Not related to C++. Sounds like modem stuff.

    > Q5 . What is IOCTL Explain .


    Dunno. Not related to C++, as far as I know.

    > Q6 . How to create an interrupt service routine in C?


    In a text editor, same as with any function. But keep ISRs short, esp.
    if doing firmware (which you probably are, if you're writing your own ISRs),
    because while the ISR is running, the rest of your program has come
    grinding to a screeching halt.

    > Q7. What are the internals of a scheduler?


    The wire loops that hold the paper sheets.

    > Q8 . The static variables are declared in heap or stack ?


    Definitely not the stack. Basically a static is the same as a global,
    except that it is visible only to functions in the translation unit in which
    it's defined.


    --
    Cheers,
    Robbie Hatley
    Tustin, CA, USA
    email: lonewolfintj at pacbell dot net
    (Include "[ciao]" in subject to bypass spam filters.)
    web: home dot pacbell dot net slant earnur slant




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    Robbie Hatley, May 15, 2004
    #17
  18. >
    > > Q1 . What is the use of pointer to an array?

    >
    > It points to it. (The name of an array is also a pointer to it.)


    No, the name of an array decays to a pointer to the first element of the
    array. A pointer to an array and a pointer to the first element of an array
    are not the same thing.

    int a[10];
    cout << &a + 1 << endl;
    cout << a + 1 << endl;

    The two statements print different pointer values, proving that a pointer to
    an array (first case) and a pointer to the first element of an array (second
    case) are not the same.

    john
     
    John Harrison, May 15, 2004
    #18
  19. "Walter" <> wrote...
    >
    > "Victor Bazarov" <> wrote in message
    > news:1_7pc.178$...
    > > > In general I agree with you. However, the questions
    > > > mentioned by the original poster may not be the whole
    > > > of the interview. For all you know they are just a
    > > > pre-screening and the answers should be no-brainers for
    > > > qualified applicants. My current employer took a lot of
    > > > time to get to know me, but only after I took a couple of
    > > > short written tests to make sure I was a C++ developer and
    > > > not a Perl hacker looking to learn C++ on the job.

    > >
    > > Shouldn't that be obvious from the resume? When employers are
    > > being picky about whom to interview, they should put more
    > > emphasis on reading the application documents and doing phone
    > > screenings. Well, just MHO, of course. All OT, BTW. :)

    >
    > You can't tell much from a resume. Most resumes read like the applicant
    > walks on water. When they list 5 years of C experience, but can't answer a
    > few simple questions about C, it's an easy way to separate out the real
    > candidates from the charlatans.


    Yes, but to ask them a few simple questions about C one needn't invite
    them for an interview. One should do it during a phone screening.

    > One of the best ways to interview is ask them to bring in a sample of some
    > programming work they wrote that they're proud of. Then have them walk you
    > through it and explain it.


    That's often not possible. I have no samples of my work. They are all
    copyrighted by my previous employers and I cannot simply spread them
    around as I please. I can explain what I did and how, but no code will
    be made available for a review. That, BTW, was precisely the point of
    another poster -- talk to the interviewee, don't test them. An interview
    is not for weeding out applicants. It's for in-depth research of the
    remaining applicants' abilities.

    Of course it all differs from company to company and mostly a moot point
    anyway. Sorry to have dragged this pointless thread even further than
    it was ever supposed to go.

    V
     
    Victor Bazarov, May 15, 2004
    #19
  20. Jatinder

    Walter Guest

    "Victor Bazarov" <> wrote in message
    news:5Rqpc.53150$536.9103227@attbi_s03...
    > "Walter" <> wrote...
    > > One of the best ways to interview is ask them to bring in a sample of

    some
    > > programming work they wrote that they're proud of. Then have them walk

    you
    > > through it and explain it.

    > That's often not possible. I have no samples of my work. They are all
    > copyrighted by my previous employers and I cannot simply spread them
    > around as I please. I can explain what I did and how, but no code will
    > be made available for a review.


    I understand and respect your wish to err on the side of caution with regard
    to copyrights and trade secrets. But surely you'd have something to bring
    in; an open source contribution, a hobby program written at home, even a
    school project. Heck, stuff I've written runs the gamut from public domain
    to super secret, from embarassing trash to novel things I should have
    patented <g>.

    Would you hire an architect to design a house for you without seeing any
    examples of their work? Call me unreasonable, but I wouldn't.
     
    Walter, May 15, 2004
    #20
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