Is Component Object Model (COM) still popular now?

Discussion in 'C++' started by blackbiscuit, May 8, 2009.

  1. blackbiscuit

    blackbiscuit Guest

    Dear all,

    I wonder whether COM is still a popular technology today. Meanwhile,
    is COM deployed in some other OS?

    Thank you very much!

    Best Regards,
    Tony
    blackbiscuit, May 8, 2009
    #1
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  2. blackbiscuit

    Linlin Yan Guest

    On May 8, 11:46 am, blackbiscuit <> wrote:
    > Dear all,
    >
    > I wonder whether COM is still a popular technology today. Meanwhile,
    > is COM deployed in some other OS?
    >
    > Thank you very much!
    >
    > Best Regards,
    > Tony


    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc301471.aspx
    Linlin Yan, May 8, 2009
    #2
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  3. blackbiscuit

    red floyd Guest

    blackbiscuit wrote:
    > Dear all,
    >
    > I wonder whether COM is still a popular technology today. Meanwhile,
    > is COM deployed in some other OS?
    >
    > Thank you very much!
    >


    Did you have a C++ language question?
    red floyd, May 8, 2009
    #3
  4. * red floyd:
    > blackbiscuit wrote:
    >> Dear all,
    >>
    >> I wonder whether COM is still a popular technology today. Meanwhile,
    >> is COM deployed in some other OS?
    >>
    >> Thank you very much!
    >>

    >
    > Did you have a C++ language question?


    It is, in a way.

    COM is one of the few successful C++ component technologies, if not the only one
    (depending on one's definition of "successful"), and so it's very relevant to
    know whether it's dead, and is on-topic in the same way as e.g. "Is Boost dead".

    Some reduced and slightly modified versions of COM are used in e.g. Linux user
    interface and in Firefox browser (XCOM). Original COM itself is however a
    Windows-specific technology. But while it's necessarily used to interface to the
    operating system and at higher levels in e.g. scripting, it's my impression that
    it's now now not much used as a general C++ component technology, i.e., that use
    of COM is something forced, not something desired and freely chosen. Microsoft
    had plans to make COM more attractive via e.g. language extensions, the fabled
    COM+ that in the end turned out as barely nothing more than a rebranding and
    bundling of their MSMQ. But as a side-effect of that effort, their "attribute"
    syntax endeth up in C++0x, so there's also a thread to standard C++... :)


    Cheers & hth.,

    - Alf

    --
    Due to hosting requirements I need visits to <url: http://alfps.izfree.com/>.
    No ads, and there is some C++ stuff! :) Just going there is good. Linking
    to it is even better! Thanks in advance!
    Alf P. Steinbach, May 8, 2009
    #4
  5. blackbiscuit

    Linlin Yan Guest

    On May 8, 1:46 pm, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    > * red floyd:
    >
    > > blackbiscuit wrote:

    >
    > > Did you have a C++ language question?

    >
    > It is, in a way.
    >
    > COM is one of the few successful C++ component technologies, if not the only one
    > (depending on one's definition of "successful"), and so it's very relevant to
    > know whether it's dead, and is on-topic in the same way as e.g. "Is Boost dead".
    >
    > Some reduced and slightly modified versions of COM are used in e.g. Linux user
    > interface and in Firefox browser (XCOM). Original COM itself is however a
    > Windows-specific technology. But while it's necessarily used to interface to the
    > operating system and at higher levels in e.g. scripting, it's my impression that
    > it's now now not much used as a general C++ component technology, i.e., that use
    > of COM is something forced, not something desired and freely chosen. Microsoft
    > had plans to make COM more attractive via e.g. language extensions, the fabled
    > COM+ that in the end turned out as barely nothing more than a rebranding and
    > bundling of their MSMQ. But as a side-effect of that effort, their "attribute"
    > syntax endeth up in C++0x, so there's also a thread to standard C++... :)
    >
    > Cheers & hth.,
    >
    > - Alf
    >
    > --
    > Due to hosting requirements I need visits to <url:http://alfps.izfree.com/>.
    > No ads, and there is some C++ stuff! :) Just going there is good. Linking
    > to it is even better! Thanks in advance!


    Thanks to Alf! That sounds so interesting!
    Linlin Yan, May 8, 2009
    #5
  6. blackbiscuit

    blackbiscuit Guest

    On 5$B7n(B8$BF|(B, $B2<8a(B1$B;~(B46$BJ,(B, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    > * red floyd:
    >
    > > blackbiscuit wrote:
    > >> Dear all,

    >
    > >> I wonder whether COM is still a popular technology today. Meanwhile,
    > >> is COM deployed in some other OS?

    >
    > >> Thank you very much!

    >
    > > Did you have a C++ language question?

    >
    > It is, in a way.
    >
    > COM is one of the few successful C++ component technologies, if not the only one
    > (depending on one's definition of "successful"), and so it's very relevant to
    > know whether it's dead, and is on-topic in the same way as e.g. "Is Boost dead".
    >
    > Some reduced and slightly modified versions of COM are used in e.g. Linux user
    > interface and in Firefox browser (XCOM). Original COM itself is however a
    > Windows-specific technology. But while it's necessarily used to interface to the
    > operating system and at higher levels in e.g. scripting, it's my impression that
    > it's now now not much used as a general C++ component technology, i.e., that use
    > of COM is something forced, not something desired and freely chosen. Microsoft
    > had plans to make COM more attractive via e.g. language extensions, the fabled
    > COM+ that in the end turned out as barely nothing more than a rebranding and
    > bundling of their MSMQ. But as a side-effect of that effort, their "attribute"
    > syntax endeth up in C++0x, so there's also a thread to standard C++... :)
    >
    > Cheers & hth.,
    >
    > - Alf
    >
    > --
    > Due to hosting requirements I need visits to <url:http://alfps.izfree.com/>.
    > No ads, and there is some C++ stuff! :) Just going there is good. Linking
    > to it is even better! Thanks in advance!



    Thank you very much! It's interesting.
    blackbiscuit, May 8, 2009
    #6
  7. Linlin Yan wrote, On 8.5.2009 7:05:
    > On May 8, 11:46 am, blackbiscuit <> wrote:
    >> Dear all,
    >>
    >> I wonder whether COM is still a popular technology today. Meanwhile,
    >> is COM deployed in some other OS?
    >>
    >> Thank you very much!
    >>
    >> Best Regards,
    >> Tony

    >
    > http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc301471.aspx

    That article is from year 2000. How does that have bearing on reality of year
    2009?

    --
    VH
    Vaclav Haisman, May 8, 2009
    #7
  8. blackbiscuit

    Guest

    Linlin Yan wrote:
    > On May 8, 1:46 pm, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    >> * red floyd:
    >>
    >>> blackbiscuit wrote:
    >>> Did you have a C++ language question?

    >> It is, in a way.
    >>
    >> COM is one of the few successful C++ component technologies, if not the only one
    >> (depending on one's definition of "successful"), and so it's very relevant to
    >> know whether it's dead, and is on-topic in the same way as e.g. "Is Boost dead".
    >>
    >> Some reduced and slightly modified versions of COM are used in e.g. Linux user
    >> interface and in Firefox browser (XCOM). Original COM itself is however a
    >> Windows-specific technology. But while it's necessarily used to interface to the
    >> operating system and at higher levels in e.g. scripting, it's my impression that
    >> it's now now not much used as a general C++ component technology, i.e., that use
    >> of COM is something forced, not something desired and freely chosen. Microsoft
    >> had plans to make COM more attractive via e.g. language extensions, the fabled
    >> COM+ that in the end turned out as barely nothing more than a rebranding and
    >> bundling of their MSMQ. But as a side-effect of that effort, their "attribute"
    >> syntax endeth up in C++0x, so there's also a thread to standard C++... :)
    >>
    >> Cheers & hth.,
    >>
    >> - Alf
    >>
    >> --
    >> Due to hosting requirements I need visits to <url:http://alfps.izfree.com/>.
    >> No ads, and there is some C++ stuff! :) Just going there is good. Linking
    >> to it is even better! Thanks in advance!

    >
    > Thanks to Alf! That sounds so interesting!


    I have just applied for a job which requires "excellent MS COM skills"
    (sic) alongside several years' experience of C++, so unless the
    advertisers have mangled the job description, COM isn't dead yet.

    The job requires "SQL/PLSQL, ASP.Net and Web skills including HTML, ASP,
    ASP.Net, JavaScript plus Linux/Unix. "

    Also "communications protocol (serial and Ethernet networks) hardware
    devices, knowledge of SCADA or other control systems, VB, Java, PHP and
    database knowledge. "

    Surprisingly, the job title is "Support Engineer", not "the Lord High
    Everything Else".

    Wish me luck.
    , May 17, 2009
    #8
  9. blackbiscuit

    Phlip Guest

    wrote:

    > I have just applied for a job which requires "excellent MS COM skills"
    > (sic) alongside several years' experience of C++, so unless the
    > advertisers have mangled the job description, COM isn't dead yet.


    If you have a "legacy system", then it will probably showcase the technologies
    popular like 8 years ago.

    > The job requires "SQL/PLSQL, ASP.Net and Web skills including HTML, ASP,
    > ASP.Net, JavaScript plus Linux/Unix. "
    >
    > Also "communications protocol (serial and Ethernet networks) hardware
    > devices, knowledge of SCADA or other control systems, VB, Java, PHP and
    > database knowledge. "
    >
    > Surprisingly, the job title is "Support Engineer", not "the Lord High
    > Everything Else".
    >
    > Wish me luck.


    Hardly. I would bet "Support Engineer" means "debugger", and you are expected to
    hunt bugs through all the layers of a helluva huge system. Hide cyanide capsules
    in your new desk - you'll probably need them!
    Phlip, May 17, 2009
    #9
  10. blackbiscuit

    Linlin Yan Guest

    On May 8, 5:18 pm, Vaclav Haisman <> wrote:
    > Linlin Yan wrote, On 8.5.2009 7:05:> On May 8, 11:46 am, blackbiscuit <> wrote:
    > >> Dear all,

    >
    > >> I wonder whether COM is still a popular technology today. Meanwhile,
    > >> is COM deployed in some other OS?

    >
    > >> Thank you very much!

    >
    > >> Best Regards,
    > >> Tony

    >
    > >http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc301471.aspx

    >
    > That article is from year 2000. How does that have bearing on reality of year
    > 2009?
    >
    > --
    > VH


    It may not express the current reality about COM, however it could
    give us some views. In my opinion, the COM technology is very old and
    there are too many substitutes today. However, it has not been totally
    extinct yet, at least in many places, such as many IT companies in
    China, where programmers are still using COM technology, as far as I
    know. Last but not least, some technologies in common use such as
    DirectX are based on COM.
    Linlin Yan, May 17, 2009
    #10
  11. blackbiscuit

    James Kanze Guest

    On May 17, 6:40 am, Phlip <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > I have just applied for a job which requires "excellent MS
    > > COM skills" (sic) alongside several years' experience of
    > > C++, so unless the advertisers have mangled the job
    > > description, COM isn't dead yet.


    > If you have a "legacy system", then it will probably showcase
    > the technologies popular like 8 years ago.


    > > The job requires "SQL/PLSQL, ASP.Net and Web skills
    > > including HTML, ASP, ASP.Net, JavaScript plus Linux/Unix. "


    > > Also "communications protocol (serial and Ethernet networks)
    > > hardware devices, knowledge of SCADA or other control
    > > systems, VB, Java, PHP and database knowledge. "


    > > Surprisingly, the job title is "Support Engineer", not "the
    > > Lord High Everything Else".


    > > Wish me luck.


    > Hardly. I would bet "Support Engineer" means "debugger", and
    > you are expected to hunt bugs through all the layers of a
    > helluva huge system. Hide cyanide capsules in your new desk -
    > you'll probably need them!


    Most of the "support engineers" I've seen deal with user
    complaints. Most of which are due to the user not having read
    the manual. Or simply being stupid. It's worse than having to
    maintain bad code. (I worked some support jobs early in my
    career, and I can assure you that the lists that you see aren't
    exagerated. He can expect about 90% of the calls to be along
    the lines: the system isn't doing X, and after investigation, he
    finds out the reason is because the user configured X off.)

    --
    James Kanze (GABI Software) email:
    Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
    Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
    9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
    James Kanze, May 17, 2009
    #11
  12. blackbiscuit

    Guest

    On May 16, 11:40 pm, Phlip <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > I have just applied for a job which requires "excellent MS COM skills"
    > > (sic) alongside several years' experience of C++, so unless the
    > > advertisers have mangled the job description, COM isn't dead yet.

    >
    > If you have a "legacy system", then it will probably showcase the technologies
    > popular like 8 years ago.
    >
    > > The job requires "SQL/PLSQL, ASP.Net and Web skills including HTML, ASP,
    > > ASP.Net, JavaScript plus Linux/Unix. "

    >
    > > Also "communications protocol (serial and Ethernet networks) hardware
    > > devices, knowledge of SCADA or other control systems, VB, Java, PHP and
    > > database knowledge. "

    >
    > > Surprisingly, the job title is "Support Engineer", not "the Lord High
    > > Everything Else".

    >
    > > Wish me luck.

    >
    > Hardly. I would bet "Support Engineer" means "debugger", and you are expected to
    > hunt bugs through all the layers of a helluva huge system. Hide cyanide capsules
    > in your new desk - you'll probably need them!


    Please disregard such terrible advice. If the job doesn't work
    out, just give them notice and trust G-d to help you.

    --
    Brian Wood
    Ebenezer Enterprises
    www.webEbenezer.net

    "Then Samuel took a rock and set it up between
    Mizpah and Shen. He named it Ebenezer [Rock of
    Help] and said, 'Until now the L-RD has helped us.'"
    , May 17, 2009
    #12
  13. blackbiscuit

    Phlip Guest

    wrote:

    >> Hardly. I would bet "Support Engineer" means "debugger", and you are expected to
    >> hunt bugs through all the layers of a helluva huge system. Hide cyanide capsules
    >> in your new desk - you'll probably need them!

    >
    > Please disregard such terrible advice. If the job doesn't work
    > out, just give them notice and trust G-d to help you.


    But don't "give them notice" until you have the next gig lined up. (G-ds help
    those who help themselves, etc..;)
    Phlip, May 17, 2009
    #13
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