Is it a good idea to get exposure to both Java & .NET in the industry?

Discussion in 'Java' started by cat_dog_ass, Apr 7, 2006.

  1. cat_dog_ass

    cat_dog_ass Guest

    I'm interested in both Java and .NET. Do you think its a good idea to
    seek exposure to both these technologies in the IT industry? Wouldn't
    it defeat my being able to gain expertise in a specific technology? How
    important is it to be generic viz-a-viz specific?

    Would it be of any use at all for me in the long run (for eg. when I'm
    a Project Manager) if I get exposure to both the competing technologies
    during my initial days in the software services industry?
    cat_dog_ass, Apr 7, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. cat_dog_ass

    Timo Stamm Guest

    Re: Is it a good idea to get exposure to both Java & .NET in theindustry?

    cat_dog_ass schrieb:
    > I'm interested in both Java and .NET. Do you think its a good idea to
    > seek exposure to both these technologies in the IT industry?


    Yes.


    > Wouldn't it defeat my being able to gain expertise in a specific technology?


    No.


    > How important is it to be generic viz-a-viz specific?


    Every experience you make is specific because you use a specific
    language to solve a specific problem.

    The generic knowledge will come by itself if you use different languages
    on different problems.

    But I think C# and Java are too similar. Have a look at functional
    languages to broaden your horizon.


    > Would it be of any use at all for me in the long run (for eg. when I'm
    > a Project Manager) if I get exposure to both the competing technologies
    > during my initial days in the software services industry?


    Useful in finding a job? Probably not.

    Useful in doing a good job? Probably yes.


    Timo
    Timo Stamm, Apr 7, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On 2006-04-07, Timo Stamm penned:
    > cat_dog_ass schrieb:
    >
    >> Would it be of any use at all for me in the long run (for eg. when
    >> I'm a Project Manager) if I get exposure to both the competing
    >> technologies during my initial days in the software services
    >> industry?

    >
    > Useful in finding a job? Probably not.
    >
    > Useful in doing a good job? Probably yes.
    >


    Odd to think of someone seeing software development as just a stepping
    stone on the way to project management.

    --
    monique

    Ask smart questions, get good answers:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    Monique Y. Mudama, Apr 7, 2006
    #3
  4. cat_dog_ass

    James McGill Guest

    Re: Is it a good idea to get exposure to both Java & .NET in theindustry?

    On Fri, 2006-04-07 at 10:24 -0600, Monique Y. Mudama wrote:

    > Odd to think of someone seeing software development as just a stepping
    > stone on the way to project management.


    In my organization, Project Managers get paid P&L based on the product's
    performance in the market, whereas Developers are salaried. Career
    development is often not possible beyond the cap of the "technical
    ladder" in many shops, whereas, Marketing and Management careers can
    lead to different places for people who can survive in the atmosphere.

    It would literally kill me, though.
    James McGill, Apr 7, 2006
    #4
  5. "Monique Y. Mudama" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2006-04-07, Timo Stamm penned:
    >> cat_dog_ass schrieb:
    >>
    >>> Would it be of any use at all for me in the long run (for eg. when
    >>> I'm a Project Manager) if I get exposure to both the competing
    >>> technologies during my initial days in the software services
    >>> industry?

    >>
    >> Useful in finding a job? Probably not.
    >>
    >> Useful in doing a good job? Probably yes.
    >>

    >
    > Odd to think of someone seeing software development as just a stepping
    > stone on the way to project management.


    It's an economic issue. While some companies are enlightened enough to have
    technical ladders that parallel the management ones, in others you reach a
    point where continuing to get raises and promotions means becoming a
    manager. It's stupid (imagine a hospital where the top surgeons "advance"
    by becoming administrators) but it's not uncommon.
    Mike Schilling, Apr 7, 2006
    #5
  6. cat_dog_ass

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Fri, 07 Apr 2006 16:58:13 GMT, "Mike Schilling"
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted
    someone who said :

    >It's an economic issue.


    My dad rose very high in management even though he detested being a
    manager. I asked him why he did it. He said that he was promoted at
    first because he was a good engineer, and then later because he was
    the person people hated least. He became the compromise candidate for
    promotions. He said you pretty well have to take the promotions
    offered, and of course he had a family of 5 kids to support.

    I resolved not to do what he did though I did end up managing my own
    small company of 8 people for a number of years.


    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Java custom programming, consulting and coaching.
    Roedy Green, Apr 7, 2006
    #6
  7. In article <>,
    "cat_dog_ass" <> wrote:

    > I'm interested in both Java and .NET. Do you think its a good idea to
    > seek exposure to both these technologies in the IT industry? Wouldn't
    > it defeat my being able to gain expertise in a specific technology? How
    > important is it to be generic viz-a-viz specific?


    When possible, work on whatever you find most interesting. If nobody is
    willing to pay for that something, then see if there is something nearly
    as interesting that they will pay for. By working on the things you
    care about and love, you will have a higher level of interest and job
    satisfaction.

    So, in this case, if you have roughly equal interest, find a job that
    will let you learn one of them thoroughly. If, on the other hand, it is
    the _comparison_ between them that is interesting, then seek a job that
    integrates the two, or that uses both for different projects.

    We, for example, had a Java robot controller that talked to a C#-driven
    scientific instrument. We had matlab code, an oracle database, and
    several web applications. There were matlab-only people, DBAs, an
    integration guy keeping everything in sync, etc. On a project like
    that, you might have a java guy, a C# guy, and a Web Services guy who
    spoke both.

    It is never a bad idea to learn new skills in IT, as long as you do not
    harm your current projects with the time you spend.

    Scott

    --
    Scott Ellsworth

    Java and database consulting for the life sciences
    Scott Ellsworth, Apr 8, 2006
    #7
  8. cat_dog_ass

    Guest

    i have a great analogy for this. i also was a semi professional
    musician.
    if you are trained in guitar, or piano, it's always advantageous to
    learn some of another instrument. whether you "master" it or not.
    exposure to chord changes on the guitar will
    make you a spectacular drummer. familiarity with holding rhythm on
    guitar will make you an instinctive keyboardist. you learn music and
    not your instrument.

    it's good to be exposed to perl, java, ajax, .net, javascript, anything
    you can get your hands on, because you'll see how its design will have
    some insight to how to solve technical issues. plus you'll get a
    broader personal "toolbox".
    , Apr 26, 2006
    #8
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Jacob Page

    Python Module Exposure

    Jacob Page, Jul 7, 2005, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    17
    Views:
    460
    George Sakkis
    Jul 10, 2005
  2. Replies:
    10
    Views:
    1,222
    Big K
    Feb 2, 2005
  3. Test
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    333
    Peter_Julian
    Mar 17, 2006
  4. cat_dog_ass
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    305
    Jakob Bieling
    Apr 7, 2006
  5. Alec Taylor
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    151
    Roy Smith
    May 4, 2013
Loading...

Share This Page