Is there a term for this?

Discussion in 'XML' started by salmo.bytes@montana-riverboats.com, Apr 27, 2005.

  1. Guest

    I often find it useful to refer to elements in an XML document using a
    limited XPath construct: the contacentated string of element
    names only, from root to any particular node in the XML. Is there a
    term for this
    idea--for XPaths constructed from concatenated element names, without
    attributes
    included in any way?


    /book[@name="xml_stuff"] ...not what I'm talking about

    /book/chapter/paragraph/sentance/ ...this is what I mean, is there a
    term for this?
     
    , Apr 27, 2005
    #1
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  2. wrote:

    : I often find it useful to refer to elements in an XML document using a
    : limited XPath construct: the contacentated string of element
    : names only, from root to any particular node in the XML. Is there a
    : term for this
    : idea--for XPaths constructed from concatenated element names, without
    : attributes
    : included in any way?


    : /book[@name="xml_stuff"] ...not what I'm talking about

    : /book/chapter/paragraph/sentance/ ...this is what I mean, is there a
    : term for this?

    Perhaps an element path.

    Or
    an xpath expression

    a location path

    a compound location path

    an abreviated compound location path

    a predicate-less abreviated compound location path


    and in this particular case,

    an absolute predicate-less abreviated compound location path


    Perhaps a "child-only path" or a "simple path".


    --

    This space not for rent.
     
    Malcolm Dew-Jones, Apr 27, 2005
    #2
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  3. wrote:
    > I often find it useful to refer to elements in an XML document using a
    > limited XPath construct: the contacentated string of element
    > names only, from root to any particular node in the XML. Is there a
    > term for this
    > idea--for XPaths constructed from concatenated element names, without
    > attributes
    > included in any way?
    >
    >
    > /book[@name="xml_stuff"] ...not what I'm talking about
    >
    > /book/chapter/paragraph/sentance/ ...this is what I mean, is there a
    > term for this?
    >


    I personnally use the term "Canonical path" ; here is my definition :

    ==============
    Canonical path
    The ·canonical path· of a node is an XPath expression that starts
    from the root node and descends from child to child until the node
    (without using the "*" joker). The sole predicate allowed in a step is
    the "indexing predicate", such as [n] where n is a non nul positive
    integer ; this predicate is not involved if the step would return a
    unique node. For example,
    /xcl:active-sheet/xcl:logic[3]/xcl:if[2]/xcl:then/xcl:parse is a valid
    ·canonical path· . When a node test involved an attribute or an element,
    the prefix used is not necessary the same used in the document, for
    example when prefixes are redefined ; a canonical path can't be used by
    an XPath engine safely if a namespace mapping is not provided.
    ==============

    In order to process a canonical path safely with an XPath engine, I put
    such canonical paths in a "path element", that hosts namespace mappings
    needed in the expression.
    --
    Cordialement,

    ///
    (. .)
    -----ooO--(_)--Ooo-----
    | Philippe Poulard |
    -----------------------
     
    Philippe Poulard, Apr 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    Thanks. I've wanted to say "canonical xpath" myself.
    But I thought that meant something else.
     
    , Apr 27, 2005
    #4
  5. writes:

    > I often find it useful to refer to elements in an XML document using a
    > limited XPath construct: the contacentated string of element
    > names only, from root to any particular node in the XML. Is there a
    > term for this
    > idea--for XPaths constructed from concatenated element names, without
    > attributes
    > included in any way?
    >
    >
    > /book[@name="xml_stuff"] ...not what I'm talking about
    >
    > /book/chapter/paragraph/sentance/ ...this is what I mean, is there a
    > term for this?


    SGML veterans frequently use the term 'fully qualified generic
    identifier' for this. That term isn't in wide use now, but
    I think I prefer it to 'canonical XPath'.

    The first version of the TEI Guidelines (in a section
    drafted by Steve DeRose) defines a similar method of
    pointing to an element in which each step has a
    position indicator; in XPath notation something like

    /book[1]/chapter[4]/paragraph[32]/sentence[3]

    The term given there is 'typed path' (as opposed to
    the numeric path /1/4/32/3).

    -C. M. Sperberg-McQueen
    World Wide Web Consortium
     
    C. M. Sperberg-McQueen, Apr 27, 2005
    #5
  6. Guest

    Thank you everybody for your input.
    It seems there is no commonly adopted term for an xpath
    as I described above (an xpath containing only the concatenated element
    names,
    without including any possible attributes in any way).

    For my own purposes, I now feel free to invent my own term, and refer
    to this as an 'elemental xpath'
     
    , Apr 28, 2005
    #6
  7. wrote:
    : Thank you everybody for your input.
    : It seems there is no commonly adopted term for an xpath
    : as I described above (an xpath containing only the concatenated element
    : names,
    : without including any possible attributes in any way).

    : For my own purposes, I now feel free to invent my own term, and refer
    : to this as an 'elemental xpath'


    which I guess is a more generalized version of the noble elemental xpath

    /He/Ne/Ar/Kr/Xe/Rn

    and closely related to the more complex possibilities of the molecular
    xpath, e.g.

    /H2O/NaCl


    both being excellent paths for aspiring chemists to follow.


    --

    This space not for rent.
     
    Malcolm Dew-Jones, Apr 28, 2005
    #7
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