Is there a Visual J++ Enterprise edition

Discussion in 'Java' started by tedqn@yahoo.com, Oct 19, 2005.

  1. Guest

    The Visual Studio 6 Enterprise edition I have contains Disc 1,2,3 and
    Visual J++ Professional Edition. Is this correct?
    , Oct 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. Oliver Wong Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The Visual Studio 6 Enterprise edition I have contains Disc 1,2,3 and
    > Visual J++ Professional Edition. Is this correct?


    Maybe I'm misunderstanding the question, but how can anyone other than
    you know what you have?

    For what it's worth, I could not find a reference to Visual J++
    Enterprise Edition on Microsoft's website (there were some references to it
    on other sites, but those other sites might not be reliable sources of
    information). I think Microsoft is also trying to push people away from J++
    and J#, and more towards C#, so I wouldn't be too surprised to find out that
    the J++ family of products is "lacking" in some way or another.

    - Oliver
    Oliver Wong, Oct 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Hi Oliver, sorry for the misunderstanding. I meant to ask people who
    also have Visual Studio 6 Enterprise Edition.
    , Oct 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Andrew Thompson wrote:
    > wrote:
    >
    >> .....I meant to ask people who
    >> also have Visual Studio 6 Enterprise Edition.

    >
    >
    > He's not available right now.
    >
    > ..Perhaps I should point out that MS and Java "don't play"
    > very well together. Any 'Java' offering from MS has had a
    > number of difficult aspects to it.
    >
    > MS tools for Java are generally obsolete, and otherwise
    > highly suspicious.


    First thing first; Visual J++ Professional shipped with VS6 Enterprise
    as I recollect it. But that was a long time ago ...

    Actually Visual J++ weren't half bad given the alternatives at the time,
    but it were twisted towards Microsoft and not any existing standards,
    using it's own windowing system etc. etc. The fact that it supports an
    actual programming language would make me use it over the more common VB
    6, if I'd have to program in VS 6. But I don't have to :)

    Today VJ++ is not suitable for anything else than maintaining legacy
    win32 code or targeting win32 sans .net platforms.

    --
    jon martin solaas
    Jon Martin Solaas, Oct 20, 2005
    #4
  5. Jon Martin Solaas wrote:
    ...
    > Today VJ++ is not suitable for anything else than maintaining legacy
    > win32 code or targeting win32 sans .net platforms.


    The only support that MS is supplying for the MSVM is ..
    - a link to the Sun plug-in.
    - a link to a tool to identify applications that make use of
    the MSVM, and therefore require conversion ( I guess the
    page would push 'convert to .NET' heavily ;).
    Andrew Thompson, Oct 20, 2005
    #5
  6. wrote:
    > The Visual Studio 6 Enterprise edition I have contains Disc 1,2,3 and
    > Visual J++ Professional Edition. Is this correct?


    If you want to learn Java, throw that stuff away. J++ is not Java. It is
    based on a very old Java version with incompatible extensions. Plus,
    Microsoft dropped development and support of J++ and Java some time ago,

    If you want to learn Java, go to Sun's web site, and download the Java
    SDK. Or, if you really want to wrestle with an IDE instead of learning
    Java, get one of the several free Java IDEs, like Eclipse, or Sun's
    Netbeans IDE.

    Start here

    http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/getStarted/cupojava/index.html

    But if you really want to do J++, please ask in a Microsoft group.

    /Thomas
    --
    The comp.lang.java.gui FAQ:
    ftp://ftp.cs.uu.nl/pub/NEWS.ANSWERS/computer-lang/java/gui/faq
    http://www.uni-giessen.de/faq/archiv/computer-lang.java.gui.faq/
    Thomas Weidenfeller, Oct 20, 2005
    #6
  7. Mickey Segal Guest

    "Jon Martin Solaas" <jonmartin.solaas@h0tm4i1> wrote in message
    news:1129792470.1cf19235c1d74a5e04d3b3f090c7f11d@teranews...
    > Today VJ++ is not suitable for anything else than maintaining legacy win32
    > code or targeting win32 sans .net platforms.


    If you have code that is Java 1.1 and you want to keep it at Java 1.1 and
    you are already using VJ++ it makes sense to keep using VJ++ - it is a fine
    development environment and it is very easy to avoid using the Microsoft
    extensions to Java. It doesn't make much sense to start using VJ++ now
    because it is a dead-end environment, having been abandoned by Microsoft.
    Mickey Segal, Oct 20, 2005
    #7
  8. writes:

    > The Visual Studio 6 Enterprise edition I have contains Disc 1,2,3 and
    > Visual J++ Professional Edition. Is this correct?


    Yes, there never was an enterprise edition of J++ since Microsoft
    abandoned Java at a point before enterprise Java was much more than
    the Servlet spec.

    Microsoft want you to use .Net instead, providing "J#" for the purpose
    of porting J++ apps to it.
    Tor Iver Wilhelmsen, Oct 21, 2005
    #8
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