Is there any one who has been working with java for a long long time?

Discussion in 'Java' started by Amanda, Nov 2, 2006.

  1. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    If so, I have a unique question.
     
    Amanda, Nov 2, 2006
    #1
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  2. Amanda

    Guest

    Amanda wrote:
    > If so, I have a unique question.


    what's a "long long time"? i'd fire off with it.
    chances are, someone knows.
     
    , Nov 2, 2006
    #2
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  3. I've been.
    What is your question?
     
    Jean-Francois Briere, Nov 2, 2006
    #3
  4. Amanda

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    Amanda wrote:
    > If so, I have a unique question.


    I have a unique suggestion.
    Ask your question, and if someone has an answer, they will likely post
    it.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Nov 2, 2006
    #4
  5. Re: Is there any one who has been working with java for a long longtime?

    Tor Iver Wilhelmsen wrote:
    > "Amanda" <> writes:
    >
    >> If so, I have a unique question.

    >
    > Have you matched it against all possible/existing questions to ensure
    > it's unique? We take such things seriously here.


    I bet it's only unique inside a given class loader context.

    Tom Hawtin (unique name within Europe, AFAIK)
     
    Thomas Hawtin, Nov 2, 2006
    #5
  6. Re: Is there any one who has been working with java for a long longtime?

    Amanda wrote:
    > If so, I have a unique question.
    >


    I don't think anyone has been working with java for a "long long time".
    Even its precursor, Oak, has only existed for about 15 years.

    However, different people have different ideas of "long" in these contexts.

    Why not just post your question?

    Patricia
     
    Patricia Shanahan, Nov 2, 2006
    #6
  7. "Amanda" <> writes:

    > If so, I have a unique question.


    Have you matched it against all possible/existing questions to ensure
    it's unique? We take such things seriously here.
     
    Tor Iver Wilhelmsen, Nov 2, 2006
    #7
  8. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    Tor Iver Wilhelmsen wrote:
    > "Amanda" <> writes:
    >
    > > If so, I have a unique question.

    >
    > Have you matched it against all possible/existing questions to ensure
    > it's unique? We take such things seriously here.


    I assure you that it is very uinique?

    When I post this unqiue question, I hope someone answers it.
     
    Amanda, Nov 3, 2006
    #8
  9. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    Jean-Francois Briere wrote:
    > I've been.
    > What is your question?


    Here it is.

    I have noticed that in some pharmaceutial industry, programmer with
    experience in J2EE, JDBC, JSP, and database knowledge such as Oracle
    with "CHEMISTRY" knowledge is desired.

    Three years ago, they were using C++. I am wondering whether they will
    move to C# or will some remain using Java?

    I have Chemistry degrees + academic level programming skills (lots of
    exposure to different topics via courses work ). I did a little bit of
    JSP as a part of school work but it's been a few years.

    I am familiarizing myself wiht C# now and am planning to spend some
    serious time to become good at J2EE, JSP, etc but also wonders whether
    I should just concentrate in C# in case these pharma companies moves
    onto C#. I realy want to get into working in Chemistry environment in
    IT sector, i.e research envrionent starting with programming work.

    What's the suggestion or opinion?
     
    Amanda, Nov 3, 2006
    #9
  10. Don't you have other Pharma sector companies other than this particular
    one? I can safely say that as long as you are cool with relocating
    wherever your job takes you, proficiency in Java Technologies will get
    you into one of the pharma companies.

    -cheers,
    Manish
     
    Manish Pandit, Nov 3, 2006
    #10
  11. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    Manish Pandit wrote:
    > Don't you have other Pharma sector companies other than this particular
    > one?


    I have yet to do more research into that.

    >I can safely say that as long as you are cool with relocating
    > wherever your job takes you, proficiency in Java Technologies will get
    > you into one of the pharma companies.


    I am in the West Coast of USA but I am willing to move to the east
    coast where there are some Pharma companies as well. In fact, some
    companies are leaving CA and living expense here is getting crazier.


    Thanks for the info on Java. I really appreciate it.

    >
    > -cheers,
    > Manish
     
    Amanda, Nov 3, 2006
    #11
  12. Amanda wrote:
    >
    > Thanks for the info on Java. I really appreciate it.


    You're welcome. One possible hurdle could be IT vs. research, as most
    of the job openings in pharma companies (like Genentech, Roche, Chiron,
    etc. in the bay area) are in their IT division. They may ask for an
    understanding of pharma business, but I am not sure if that'd need
    chemistry. You might want to get into IT as a stepping stone, and then
    move in towards the research/lab divisions if there are any internal
    openings.

    -cheers,
    Manish
     
    Manish Pandit, Nov 3, 2006
    #12
  13. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    Manish Pandit wrote:
    > Amanda wrote:
    > >
    > > Thanks for the info on Java. I really appreciate it.

    >
    > You're welcome. One possible hurdle could be IT vs. research, as most
    > of the job openings in pharma companies (like Genentech, Roche, Chiron,
    > etc. in the bay area) are in their IT division. They may ask for an
    > understanding of pharma business, but I am not sure if that'd need
    > chemistry. You might want to get into IT as a stepping stone, and then
    > move in towards the research/lab divisions if there are any internal
    > openings.
    >
    > -cheers,
    > Manish


    Thanks again for the info. Yes, I should get into IT first ( will try
    contract work but first needs to do project on my own since no schools
    offers specific cousre for what I want to get good at) and get
    industrial experience before trying pharma companies.

    About pharma business, I had seen specific knowledge requirement in
    Protein Synthesis while stating BS/MS in Chemistry or Computer Science
    stating the IT requirements but recently, I have been seeing no
    specific mentioning except w.r.t IT with stating that it would be in
    chemistry environment requiring Chemistry knowledge. I am okay with
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology - have basic knowledge in both and
    can catch up easily with those.

    I'll be very happy to do even "unpaid" internship in Java even if I
    have to move as lon as it would be good experience.
     
    Amanda, Nov 3, 2006
    #13
  14. Amanda

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <>, Amanda
    ('') wrote:

    > If so, I have a unique question.


    I've been using it as my principle language since 1996, and first taught a
    course in it in 1995 - the year it was publicly announced. I imagine there
    are plenty of other people here who could say the same. I never used Oak,
    but I have used a lot of languages which were in one way or another
    predecessors to Java; I've been programming in object-oriented languages
    since 1986.

    --
    (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Semper in faecibus sumus, sole profundum variat.
     
    Simon Brooke, Nov 3, 2006
    #14
  15. Amanda

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <>, Amanda
    ('') wrote:

    >
    > Jean-Francois Briere wrote:
    >> I've been.
    >> What is your question?

    >
    > Here it is.
    >
    > I have noticed that in some pharmaceutial industry, programmer with
    > experience in J2EE, JDBC, JSP, and database knowledge such as Oracle
    > with "CHEMISTRY" knowledge is desired.
    >
    > Three years ago, they were using C++. I am wondering whether they will
    > move to C# or will some remain using Java?


    That's a commercial question, not a technical one.

    There's no significant technical benefit of C# over Java; C# is simply a
    copy of Java as close as Microsoft can get without violating Sun's various
    contracts and intellectual property protections. C# does benefit a little
    from coming later and learning from a few of Java's mistakes, but not in
    any significant way - most of the things which are wrong with Java are
    identical in C#.

    If your employer is a Microsoft house, sooner or later they'll move to C#.
    If your employer is not a Microsoft house, or wishes to keep their
    long-term strategic options open, they won't.

    > I have Chemistry degrees + academic level programming skills (lots of
    > exposure to different topics via courses work ). I did a little bit of
    > JSP as a part of school work but it's been a few years.
    >
    > I am familiarizing myself wiht C# now and am planning to spend some
    > serious time to become good at J2EE, JSP, etc but also wonders whether
    > I should just concentrate in C# in case these pharma companies moves
    > onto C#.


    If you are looking at big companies, my bet is they cannot afford to be
    strategically dependent on Microsoft, and so will stay with Java. This
    isn't simply a choice between Microsoft and Sun, since Microsoft are the
    only main suppliers of the C# environment, whereas Java can be
    second-sourced from IBM and others. It is this relative openness which,
    for large companies at least, will continue to give Java its relative edge
    over C#.

    --
    (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Diplomacy, American: see Intelligence, Military
     
    Simon Brooke, Nov 3, 2006
    #15
  16. Amanda

    Chris Uppal Guest

    Amanda wrote:

    > When I post this unqiue question, I hope someone answers it.


    Probably nobody will know the answer...

    (In a working newsgroup, a lot of the communal knowledge at any one time has
    been learned from reading previous posts -- so a genuinely new question might
    stump the whole community ;-)

    -- chris
     
    Chris Uppal, Nov 3, 2006
    #16
  17. Amanda wrote:
    > If so, I have a unique question.


    I have been using java for several hundred thousand years now. I am
    still a newbie, but pose your question anyway.
     
    Furious George, Nov 3, 2006
    #17
  18. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    Furious George wrote:
    > Amanda wrote:
    > > If so, I have a unique question.

    >
    > I have been using java for several hundred thousand years now.


    I didn't know that Java has been around that long? Any evidence?


    >I am still a newbie, but pose your question anyway.


    I need to develop a reasonable size project (or more than one) using
    jsp, using JDBC, so that I can show as personal project on my resume.
    Any guidance?

    Would you recommend Tomcat or JBoss? MySQL or another database such as
    oracle. I have SQL Server (not express ed) btw.
     
    Amanda, Nov 3, 2006
    #18
  19. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > in message <>, Amanda
    > ('') wrote:
    >
    > > If so, I have a unique question.

    >
    > I've been using it as my principle language since 1996, and first taught a
    > course in it in 1995 - the year it was publicly announced. I imagine there
    > are plenty of other people here who could say the same. I never used Oak,
    > but I have used a lot of languages which were in one way or another
    > predecessors to Java; I've been programming in object-oriented languages
    > since 1986.


    So have you been teaching Java lately?

    >
    > --
    > (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    >
    > ;; Semper in faecibus sumus, sole profundum variat.
     
    Amanda, Nov 3, 2006
    #19
  20. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > in message <>, Amanda
    > ('') wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Jean-Francois Briere wrote:
    > >> I've been.
    > >> What is your question?

    > >
    > > Here it is.
    > >
    > > I have noticed that in some pharmaceutial industry, programmer with
    > > experience in J2EE, JDBC, JSP, and database knowledge such as Oracle
    > > with "CHEMISTRY" knowledge is desired.
    > >
    > > Three years ago, they were using C++. I am wondering whether they will
    > > move to C# or will some remain using Java?

    >
    > That's a commercial question, not a technical one.


    Right.

    >
    > There's no significant technical benefit of C# over Java; C# is simply a
    > copy of Java as close as Microsoft can get without violating Sun's various
    > contracts and intellectual property protections. C# does benefit a little
    > from coming later and learning from a few of Java's mistakes, but not in
    > any significant way - most of the things which are wrong with Java are
    > identical in C#.


    I personally feel that Microsoft stole form Suna nd call it C#.

    >
    > If your employer is a Microsoft house, sooner or later they'll move to C#.
    > If your employer is not a Microsoft house, or wishes to keep their
    > long-term strategic options open, they won't.


    I see. I didn't think of that.
    So if a big pharma company uses java, it's not likely that they will
    move to .Net then.



    >
    > > I have Chemistry degrees + academic level programming skills (lots of
    > > exposure to different topics via courses work ). I did a little bit of
    > > JSP as a part of school work but it's been a few years.
    > >
    > > I am familiarizing myself wiht C# now and am planning to spend some
    > > serious time to become good at J2EE, JSP, etc but also wonders whether
    > > I should just concentrate in C# in case these pharma companies moves
    > > onto C#.

    >
    > If you are looking at big companies, my bet is they cannot afford to be
    > strategically dependent on Microsoft, and so will stay with Java.


    Hmm. A friend of mine - he is seriosu Java Programmer - got an
    interview with a big pharma company in East Coast and was told that
    they would get into C#. I don't know what they were/are using though.

    >This
    > isn't simply a choice between Microsoft and Sun, since Microsoft are the
    > only main suppliers of the C# environment, whereas Java can be
    > second-sourced from IBM and others. It is this relative openness which,
    > for large companies at least, will continue to give Java its relative edge
    > over C#.


    Thanks a lot for this info. Now I know what to stick with at the moment
    to reach my goal.
    I am happy to hear that C# won't beat Java.

    >
    > --
    > (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    >
    > ;; Diplomacy, American: see Intelligence, Military
     
    Amanda, Nov 3, 2006
    #20
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