Is there any "true" W3C standard browser?

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Lau Lei Cheong, Jan 11, 2006.

  1. Hello,

    Actually, I'm wondering if there's anything of the sort avaliable in
    the wild - a developer oriented W3C browser. It's kinda W3C's online
    validation service, just that it runs on locahost as an application. It
    reads a config file to see what is allowed to pass, and what is depreciated,
    and whether fails the deperciated one.

    Basically, it'll only render what W3C recommandations and nothing
    more. It'll not render any tag/properties it's doesn't know. The ignored
    tags can be seen on seperate dialog/logfile. If there's missing/cross tags,
    it'll just stop and scream in bright red color about what happened if a
    related option such as "--no-mercy" is selected. I hope that it supports
    options such as "--css2", "--html401", "--strict", "--transitional",
    "--no-mercy", "--ignore-unknown-tag" etc so it can intergrates nicely with
    the VS.NET IDE. And it'll be perfect if it can download latest schemas from
    the W3C website.

    Seems that I'm asking for too much, but just wondering if such
    thing(or a close one) exist. It'll be quite handy.

    Regards,
    Lau Lei Cheong
     
    Lau Lei Cheong, Jan 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. Yes, you are asking for a bit much. You're asking for your own customized
    personal browser that behaves exactly as you have described. However, there
    is a browser that can get you pretty close to what you have described:
    FireFox. With the addition of certain FireFox extensions, you can validate
    documents in the browser, view various properties, etc. The "DOM Inspector"
    and "Web Developer" extensions are particularly useful. FireFox is a "pure"
    Mozilla browser, and is the closest to the W3C recommendations of any
    existing browser out there (that I know of). However, like most browsers, it
    is not likely to misbehave as you've described when it encounters poor HTML.
    It will tell you what is wrong with it, however.

    --
    HTH,

    Kevin Spencer
    Microsoft MVP
    ..Net Developer
    You can lead a fish to a bicycle,
    but it takes a very long time,
    and the bicycle has to *want* to change.

    "Lau Lei Cheong" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > Actually, I'm wondering if there's anything of the sort avaliable
    > in the wild - a developer oriented W3C browser. It's kinda W3C's online
    > validation service, just that it runs on locahost as an application. It
    > reads a config file to see what is allowed to pass, and what is
    > depreciated, and whether fails the deperciated one.
    >
    > Basically, it'll only render what W3C recommandations and nothing
    > more. It'll not render any tag/properties it's doesn't know. The ignored
    > tags can be seen on seperate dialog/logfile. If there's missing/cross
    > tags, it'll just stop and scream in bright red color about what happened
    > if a related option such as "--no-mercy" is selected. I hope that it
    > supports options such as "--css2", "--html401", "--strict",
    > "--transitional", "--no-mercy", "--ignore-unknown-tag" etc so it can
    > intergrates nicely with the VS.NET IDE. And it'll be perfect if it can
    > download latest schemas from the W3C website.
    >
    > Seems that I'm asking for too much, but just wondering if such
    > thing(or a close one) exist. It'll be quite handy.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Lau Lei Cheong
    >
    >
     
    Kevin Spencer, Jan 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. Yes. I'm asking for "developer oriented browser".

    Actually, all the features I've described is what features I imagine the
    browser would best have, but basically, I just want a brower that will went
    wrong when any of my code went wrong(that's what the "no-mercy" option is
    for).

    I've been suffered problem where the designer hand me HTML codes that has
    something wrong in it, but I didn't make found it. Although IE and Firefox
    are mercy enough to attempt to render the page correctly, some of the "other
    browsers" don't, and my clients complains.

    So I decide to seek for tools that'll tell me when the code wrong and warn
    me about it.

    "Kevin Spencer" <> ¼¶¼g©ó¶l¥ó·s»D:e%...
    > Yes, you are asking for a bit much. You're asking for your own customized
    > personal browser that behaves exactly as you have described. However,
    > there is a browser that can get you pretty close to what you have
    > described: FireFox. With the addition of certain FireFox extensions, you
    > can validate documents in the browser, view various properties, etc. The
    > "DOM Inspector" and "Web Developer" extensions are particularly useful.
    > FireFox is a "pure" Mozilla browser, and is the closest to the W3C
    > recommendations of any existing browser out there (that I know of).
    > However, like most browsers, it is not likely to misbehave as you've
    > described when it encounters poor HTML. It will tell you what is wrong
    > with it, however.
    >
    > --
    > HTH,
    >
    > Kevin Spencer
    > Microsoft MVP
    > .Net Developer
    > You can lead a fish to a bicycle,
    > but it takes a very long time,
    > and the bicycle has to *want* to change.
    >
    > "Lau Lei Cheong" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> Actually, I'm wondering if there's anything of the sort avaliable
    >> in the wild - a developer oriented W3C browser. It's kinda W3C's online
    >> validation service, just that it runs on locahost as an application. It
    >> reads a config file to see what is allowed to pass, and what is
    >> depreciated, and whether fails the deperciated one.
    >>
    >> Basically, it'll only render what W3C recommandations and nothing
    >> more. It'll not render any tag/properties it's doesn't know. The ignored
    >> tags can be seen on seperate dialog/logfile. If there's missing/cross
    >> tags, it'll just stop and scream in bright red color about what happened
    >> if a related option such as "--no-mercy" is selected. I hope that it
    >> supports options such as "--css2", "--html401", "--strict",
    >> "--transitional", "--no-mercy", "--ignore-unknown-tag" etc so it can
    >> intergrates nicely with the VS.NET IDE. And it'll be perfect if it can
    >> download latest schemas from the W3C website.
    >>
    >> Seems that I'm asking for too much, but just wondering if such
    >> thing(or a close one) exist. It'll be quite handy.
    >>
    >> Regards,
    >> Lau Lei Cheong
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Lau Lei Cheong, Jan 12, 2006
    #3
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