is there standard file format that encapsulates xml+css in one file? (for use without an internet c

Discussion in 'XML' started by john schultz, Jun 5, 2004.

  1. john schultz

    john schultz Guest

    is there a standard file format that encapsulates some xml data and a
    stylesheet with which to display it in one file? ...and which doesn't
    require an internet connection. of course xml lets you reference a
    remote stylesheet with a url, but I'm looking for something that
    actually stores the stylesheet WITH the xml.

    any ideas?
     
    john schultz, Jun 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. john schultz () wrote:
    : is there a standard file format that encapsulates some xml data and a
    : stylesheet with which to display it in one file? ...and which doesn't
    : require an internet connection. of course xml lets you reference a
    : remote stylesheet with a url, but I'm looking for something that
    : actually stores the stylesheet WITH the xml.

    : any ideas?

    MIME can do that sort of thing (that's how html mail message are built
    that contain their own images).

    $0.02

    Presumably you could simply define a higher level xml document to do this
    if you wished.

    <complete-document>
    <style-sheet-stuff>
    -style sheet- stuff goes here-
    </style-sheet-stuff>
    <rest-of-document>
    -the original document goes here-
    </rest-of-document>
    </complete-document>

    And some things (html comes to mind) already allow their style sheets to
    be part of the document.
     
    Malcolm Dew-Jones, Jun 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. In article <>,
    (Malcolm Dew-Jones) writes:
    > john schultz () wrote:
    >: is there a standard file format that encapsulates some xml data and a
    >: stylesheet with which to display it in one file? ...and which doesn't
    >: require an internet connection. of course xml lets you reference a
    >: remote stylesheet with a url, but I'm looking for something that
    >: actually stores the stylesheet WITH the xml.
    >
    > And some things (html comes to mind) already allow their style sheets to
    > be part of the document.


    XHTML 1.0 or XHTML 1.1 (see w3.org).

    But be warned: HTML user agents are not required to support
    all CSS (e.g. display: property may be ignored).
     
    Victor Porton, Jun 5, 2004
    #3
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