Is this feasible?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Shepard Tate, Feb 25, 2004.

  1. Shepard Tate

    Shepard Tate Guest

    We want to begin a web page for our high school dept. We have someone
    at the school district who will help us get it up and running. I know
    very little html myself, only the simple tags that you can use in a
    blog, that sort of thing. I have not been successful learning
    anything beyond the most elementary basics of html. I think some
    people can get it and others just think differently or something.

    We have wanted to do this for a few years, but no one was willing to
    take it on so. So....I have volunteered to do the writing, updating
    of event calendars etc. and to work with our helper at the school
    district. Eventually I want to be able to add text, updates,
    pictures, monthly calendars, etc. to the site myself. Also want to be
    able to make changes to the content on the site. Will I be able to do
    this sort of thing without becoming an html expert? If we depend on
    the district employee for every little update or change, things won't
    be kept up to date as he is very busy and stretched thin.

    Someone told me that they thought there was software available that
    would allow me to work on the pages on my PC and just upload revised
    pages as needed to the site.

    Any advice or comments on this?

    Thanks - Sherrie Shepard
    Shepard Tate, Feb 25, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Shepard Tate

    Paul Furman Guest

    Shepard Tate wrote:

    > We want to begin a web page for our high school dept. We have someone
    > at the school district who will help us get it up and running. I know
    > very little html myself, only the simple tags that you can use in a
    > blog, that sort of thing. I have not been successful learning
    > anything beyond the most elementary basics of html. I think some
    > people can get it and others just think differently or something.
    >
    > We have wanted to do this for a few years, but no one was willing to
    > take it on so. So....I have volunteered to do the writing, updating
    > of event calendars etc. and to work with our helper at the school
    > district. Eventually I want to be able to add text, updates,
    > pictures, monthly calendars, etc. to the site myself. Also want to be
    > able to make changes to the content on the site. Will I be able to do
    > this sort of thing without becoming an html expert? If we depend on
    > the district employee for every little update or change, things won't
    > be kept up to date as he is very busy and stretched thin.
    >
    > Someone told me that they thought there was software available that
    > would allow me to work on the pages on my PC and just upload revised
    > pages as needed to the site.
    >
    > Any advice or comments on this?
    >
    > Thanks - Sherrie Shepard



    I think if you vow to keep it as simple as possible it should be no
    problem. No tricky formatting till you understand it and there won't be
    problems. Where people make a mess and get overwhelmed is trying to do
    more than they understand.

    <h1>This is a Header</h1>

    <p>This is a paragraph.</p>

    <ul>
    <li> This is a list</li>
    <li> This is a list</li>
    </ul>

    <a href="other-page.htm">
    Link to another page
    </a>

    Don't add pictures till you know how to size them and compress them so
    they download easily.

    One step at a time. A basic text outline is fine to begin with and
    actually easier to read than a big mess of tricks. See how each tag
    works and just let them set the layout. You can adjust their behavior
    later with a style sheet but for now just let them be and don't struggle
    trying to make them something they aren't.
    Paul Furman, Feb 26, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Shepard Tate

    mscir Guest

    Shepard Tate wrote:
    > We want to begin a web page for our high school dept. We have someone
    > at the school district who will help us get it up and running. I know
    > very little html myself, only the simple tags that you can use in a
    > blog, that sort of thing. I have not been successful learning
    > anything beyond the most elementary basics of html. I think some
    > people can get it and others just think differently or something.
    >
    > We have wanted to do this for a few years, but no one was willing to
    > take it on so. So....I have volunteered to do the writing, updating
    > of event calendars etc. and to work with our helper at the school
    > district. Eventually I want to be able to add text, updates,
    > pictures, monthly calendars, etc. to the site myself. Also want to be
    > able to make changes to the content on the site. Will I be able to do
    > this sort of thing without becoming an html expert? If we depend on
    > the district employee for every little update or change, things won't
    > be kept up to date as he is very busy and stretched thin.
    >
    > Someone told me that they thought there was software available that
    > would allow me to work on the pages on my PC and just upload revised
    > pages as needed to the site.


    I would check out a few books on HTML from your local library. There are
    a lot of free html editors that you can use to make web pages, but it
    would be really helpful to learn the basics first. I would also
    recommend that you read a beginners book about CSS - cascading style
    sheets, after you learn the basics of HTML.

    Then if you decide to use an editor to make your web pages, you can
    clean up or modify the html that it generates and understand what you're
    doing. I started out making web pages with Microsoft FrontPage, but
    after I read one book on html (sorry, can't recall the title) I found I
    could shrink the page (file) size of many pages by 25% or more -
    removing unnecessary html that FrontPage added for no apparent reason. I
    do not recommend using FrontPage unless you are willing to clean up the
    html afterwards.

    Good Luck,
    Mike
    mscir, Feb 26, 2004
    #3
  4. Shepard Tate wrote:
    > We want to begin a web page for our high school dept. We have someone
    > at the school district who will help us get it up and running. I know
    > very little html myself, only the simple tags that you can use in a
    > blog, that sort of thing. I have not been successful learning
    > anything beyond the most elementary basics of html. I think some
    > people can get it and others just think differently or something.


    Nah, HTML is easy to learn, you just have to find the right approach.
    Courses, books, online tutorials like
    <http://www.w3schools.com/html/>... try them all and see what's the best
    method for you.


    > We have wanted to do this for a few years, but no one was willing to
    > take it on so. So....I have volunteered to do the writing, updating
    > of event calendars etc. and to work with our helper at the school
    > district. Eventually I want to be able to add text, updates,
    > pictures, monthly calendars, etc. to the site myself. Also want to be
    > able to make changes to the content on the site. Will I be able to do
    > this sort of thing without becoming an html expert? If we depend on
    > the district employee for every little update or change, things won't
    > be kept up to date as he is very busy and stretched thin.



    Sure. Take a look at Content Management Systems. A really simple tool is
    e.g. Macromedia Contribute. I think it's good for basic site
    maintenance. Or you could find someone who will install a light-weight
    content management system on the server. Some people even use their blog
    software.

    The important thing for your kind of site is not the bells&whistles but
    how current it is! Initially a start page with updated daily events,
    stories, gossip, an occasional image etc. should be technically easy to
    make, and fun and interesting for your visitors.

    That said, why don't you use your blogging software? You're already
    familiar with it and can probably get the system running in no time at all.


    Matthias
    Matthias Gutfeldt, Feb 26, 2004
    #4
  5. Shepard Tate wrote in message ...
    > I have not been successful learning
    > anything beyond the most elementary basics of html.


    This indicates to me that you want to work simply and not to be bothered
    with learning HTML as you lead a busy life :~)

    > Someone told me that they thought there was software available that
    > would allow me to work on the pages on my PC and just upload revised
    > pages as needed to the site.


    If you are familiar with using Microsoft 'Word' then I'd advise getting
    hold of a copy of Microsoft 'Frontpage 2000' or preferably the newer
    version, as it works in a similar way. Although Microsoft 'Word' can be
    used for your HTLM creation, DO NOT use it as it takes ages to download all
    the code for web pages.

    I will get slated here for advising 'Frontpage', BUT many web designers use
    it successfully and it's quick, it's easy, and you can upload to your
    website from the program, as well as uploading any changes or additions you
    wish to make.
    Trevor George, Feb 26, 2004
    #5
  6. Shepard Tate

    PeterL Guest

    Trevor George wrote:
    > Shepard Tate wrote in message ...
    >> I have not been successful learning
    >> anything beyond the most elementary basics of html.


    Could I suggest you look around other similar sites and view source codes
    etc. Then when you see something you like you can get a basic design and
    the necessary markup and adapt according to your own needs. You may also be
    able to get some practical help for others in a similar situation.


    PeterL



    ========================================

    Petes Page
    http://leach01.co.uk

    Jordanstown Schools website
    http://jord.org.uk
    PeterL, Feb 26, 2004
    #6
  7. Shepard Tate

    Paul Furman Guest

    Matthias Gutfeldt wrote:
    >
    > The important thing for your kind of site is not the bells&whistles but
    > how current it is! Initially a start page with updated daily events,
    > stories, gossip, an occasional image etc. should be technically easy to
    > make, and fun and interesting for your visitors.
    >
    > That said, why don't you use your blogging software? You're already
    > familiar with it and can probably get the system running in no time at all.



    If your hosting service can run PHP, it's not terribly hard to set up
    some blog software like postNuke, then you've got a really slick site
    that people can log into and add their stories and comments also if you
    want to go that far.
    Paul Furman, Feb 26, 2004
    #7
  8. Trevor George wrote:
    > I will get slated here for advising 'Frontpage', BUT many web designers use
    > it successfully


    Or so they think. How will you know if someone leaves your site because
    the loading time is too long or they can't use the inaccessible HTML
    FrontPage produces?

    > and it's quick


    In the short run, for you. Maintenance will take longer, and it will
    take longer for users to load your page.

    > it's easy


    Again, only for you in the short run. It will be harder disabled people
    and people using more standards-compliant browsers to view your pages,
    and maintenance will be a large headache. Not to mention how hard it
    will be to pay for FrontPage.

    > and you can upload to your website from the program, as well as uploading
    > any changes or additions you wish to make.


    Then get a nice text editor with an upload feature.
    Leif K-Brooks, Feb 27, 2004
    #8
  9. Shepard Tate

    Steve R. Guest

    Leif K-Brooks wrote in message ...
    > How will you know if someone leaves your site because
    > the loading time is too long.


    Everyone admits that Fronpage HTML is bloated, but it's not *that* bloated
    to significantly prolong the download time of the HTML. The main reason for
    long download times on 99% of websites is the use of badly web-optimised
    gifs or jpegs and the use of lots of gif menu *buttons* when text links are
    perfectly adequate.

    > or they can't use the inaccessible HTML
    > FrontPage produces?


    As Frontpage is a Microsoft product you can be sure it *will* be accessible
    to all those folk using IE as a browser, and I reckon that's got to be a
    around 99% of all internet users. That's a pretty good percentage :~)
    Steve R., Feb 27, 2004
    #9
  10. Shepard Tate

    Marco Bakker Guest

    Steve R. <stevie_ritchie(NOSPAM)@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Leif K-Brooks wrote in message ...
    > > How will you know if someone leaves your site because
    > > the loading time is too long.

    >
    > Everyone admits that Fronpage HTML is bloated, but it's not *that* bloated
    > to significantly prolong the download time of the HTML. The main reason for
    > long download times on 99% of websites is the use of badly web-optimised
    > gifs or jpegs and the use of lots of gif menu *buttons* when text links are
    > perfectly adequate.
    >
    > > or they can't use the inaccessible HTML
    > > FrontPage produces?

    >
    > As Frontpage is a Microsoft product you can be sure it *will* be accessible
    > to all those folk using IE as a browser, and I reckon that's got to be a
    > around 99% of all internet users. That's a pretty good percentage :~)


    Should the web only be accessible to Microsoft users?
    Why? Do they own it? Is there a door policy? Get real.

    --
    marco
    Marco Bakker, Feb 27, 2004
    #10
  11. Shepard Tate

    Steve R. Guest

    Marco Bakker wrote in message ...
    > Should the web only be accessible to Microsoft users?
    > Why? Do they own it? Is there a door policy? Get real.


    You have completely misread what I am stating. I did not say *only*, but
    was referring to the compatibility of 'Frontpage' to the majority of
    browsers used and in the case for the 'Original Poster' to see that
    'Frontpage' may well be a good investment. It's as simple as that.

    I'm being *real* in the sense that if I'm selling something as long as the
    majority of *users* can see my product, I'm really not bothered about the
    1% who can't see them. It just takes too much time and effort to make it
    cost-effective to cater for the odd 1%.
    Steve R., Feb 27, 2004
    #11
  12. Shepard Tate

    Marco Bakker Guest

    Steve R. <stevie_ritchie(NOSPAM)@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Marco Bakker wrote in message ...
    > > Should the web only be accessible to Microsoft users?
    > > Why? Do they own it? Is there a door policy? Get real.

    >
    > You have completely misread what I am stating. I did not say *only*, but
    > was referring to the compatibility of 'Frontpage' to the majority of
    > browsers used and in the case for the 'Original Poster' to see that
    > 'Frontpage' may well be a good investment. It's as simple as that.
    >
    > I'm being *real* in the sense that if I'm selling something as long as the
    > majority of *users* can see my product, I'm really not bothered about the
    > 1% who can't see them. It just takes too much time and effort to make it
    > cost-effective to cater for the odd 1%.


    If using Frontpage I believe you're right in saying that. It will
    probably take a lot of time to create pages that are standards complaint
    and work in every browser on this planet when using Frontpage. But it
    should be a small effort to use a tool afterwards to clean up the HTML.
    There are tools for doing just that, you know.

    Oh well, just move on using frontpage. Microsoft broke the web on the
    client side with their buggy browsers, now let's help them to break it
    on the server side as well by serving crappy HTML created with
    Frontpage.

    I think I did not misread anything of what you were saying. You are not
    interested in the other 1% of users. Which makes you a person who thinks
    that it is good enough if the web is accessible for 99% of the people.
    In my opinion it is rather useless to say 'My website should be
    accessible to Microsoft users'. That is rather unprofessional. I don't
    think Amazon would like it if they lose 1% of their buyers because of an
    inaccessible webpage. Professional webdesign starts when you say that
    you want your site to be accessible for 100% of your users.

    Standards compliant webdesign saves you time and efforts. That is a fact
    that a lot of people just don't seem to understand.

    --
    marco
    Marco Bakker, Feb 27, 2004
    #12
  13. Shepard Tate

    Firas D. Guest

    Marco Bakker wrote:
    > Professional webdesign starts when you say that
    > you want your site to be accessible for 100% of your users.


    But the OP isn't a pro...
    Firas D., Feb 27, 2004
    #13
  14. Shepard Tate

    Marco Bakker Guest

    Firas D. <> wrote:

    > Marco Bakker wrote:
    > > Professional webdesign starts when you say that
    > > you want your site to be accessible for 100% of your users.

    >
    > But the OP isn't a pro...


    There are also a lot of things I don't do professionally. But that
    doesn't imply I have to screw up in those areas.

    --
    marco
    Marco Bakker, Feb 27, 2004
    #14
  15. Shepard Tate

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <1g9tbdp.1fo3io8k783qcN%>,
    lid says...
    > > As Frontpage is a Microsoft product you can be sure it *will* be accessible
    > > to all those folk using IE as a browser, and I reckon that's got to be a
    > > around 99% of all internet users. That's a pretty good percentage :~)

    > Should the web only be accessible to Microsoft users?
    > Why? Do they own it? Is there a door policy? Get real.


    This is to both of you:

    Making a site with frontpage and accessibility are not mutually
    exclusive. As much as you would like it to, it does not put in code
    that says "if this is opera or mozilla then don't work"

    Accessibility is 100% on the part of the person coding no matter HOW
    they create the page.

    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Feb 27, 2004
    #15
  16. Shepard Tate

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <1g9tco8.pdhr47gl9iukN%>,
    lid says...
    > Professional webdesign starts when you say that
    > you want your site to be accessible for 100% of your users.


    That is not true at all. That is what YOU believe, but is not what all
    professional web designers believe.

    > Standards compliant webdesign saves you time and efforts. That is a fact
    > that a lot of people just don't seem to understand.


    Driving away customers that enjoy pizzazz is a fact you don't
    understand.

    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Feb 27, 2004
    #16
  17. Shepard Tate

    Marco Bakker Guest

    Whitecrest <> wrote:

    > In article <1g9tco8.pdhr47gl9iukN%>,
    > lid says...
    > > Professional webdesign starts when you say that
    > > you want your site to be accessible for 100% of your users.

    >
    > That is not true at all. That is what YOU believe, but is not what all
    > professional web designers believe.


    Yes that is what I believe. I didn't say anything about what others
    might believe. What is your point?

    > > Standards compliant webdesign saves you time and efforts. That is a fact
    > > that a lot of people just don't seem to understand.

    >
    > Driving away customers that enjoy pizzazz is a fact you don't
    > understand.


    Would a standards compliant website drive away customers that enjoy
    pizza? Depends on the content, just as with any other website.

    --
    marco
    Marco Bakker, Feb 27, 2004
    #17
  18. Shepard Tate

    Steve R. Guest

    Marco Bakker wrote in message ...
    > There are also a lot of things I don't do professionally.
    > But that doesn't imply I have to screw up in those areas.


    But if you are not a *pro* in those areas ...

    How do *you* know you are NOT screwing up ?

    Only a pro in *those* areas will know that :~)
    Steve R., Feb 27, 2004
    #18
  19. Shepard Tate

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <1g9ttcx.11z6ksw1s25jb4N%>,
    lid says...
    > Whitecrest <> wrote:
    > > > you want your site to be accessible for 100% of your users.

    > > That is not true at all. That is what YOU believe, but is not what all
    > > professional web designers believe.

    > Yes that is what I believe. I didn't say anything about what others
    > might believe. What is your point?


    Oh my bad, I assumed since you said "Professional web design" You were
    referring to more than yourself.

    > > Driving away customers that enjoy pizzazz is a fact you don't
    > > understand.

    >
    > Would a standards compliant website drive away customers that enjoy
    > pizza? Depends on the content, just as with any other website.


    Can not agree more.

    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Feb 27, 2004
    #19
  20. Shepard Tate

    Steve Guest

    Sherrie, try using a ' what you see is what you get' website creation
    program - I highly recommend Macromedia's Dreamweaver. If you can use a
    newsgroup, your sure to be able to pick it up in no time.

    Steve
    Steve, Feb 27, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. HUANG Huan
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    660
    Dave Higton
    Feb 24, 2004
  2. lapenta[
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    737
    Mike Treseler
    Nov 6, 2004
  3. Taras_96
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    4,848
    Taras_96
    Aug 3, 2005
  4. Newbie
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    386
    Newbie
    Oct 27, 2003
  5. Doug

    html mail form feasible?

    Doug, Oct 30, 2005, in forum: HTML
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    353
    David Dorward
    Oct 30, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page