ISO documentation on Perl's standard directory structure

Discussion in 'Perl Misc' started by kj, Oct 9, 2005.

  1. kj

    kj Guest

    Where is the standard structure for Perl directories and files
    documented? I have seen many variants (e.g. /usr/lib/perl5
    or /usr/lib/perl/5.8.6, etc.)

    I suppose the answer to this question is OS-dependent. I'm most
    interested in Linux (Debian and Suse), Mac OS X, ActiveState, and
    Cygwin.

    Does ExtUtils::MakeMaker read this information from somewhere (e.g.
    Config), or is it hard-coded into it? (I made an attempt to read
    the source for MakeMaker, but gave up after a couple of fruitless
    hours.)

    Thanks!

    kj


    --
    NOTE: In my address everything before the first period is backwards;
    and the last period, and everything after it, should be discarded.
    kj, Oct 9, 2005
    #1
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  2. kj

    Sisyphus Guest

    "kj" <> wrote in message
    news:di9q3c$b7m$...
    >
    >
    >
    > Where is the standard structure for Perl directories and files
    > documented? I have seen many variants (e.g. /usr/lib/perl5
    > or /usr/lib/perl/5.8.6, etc.)
    >
    > I suppose the answer to this question is OS-dependent. I'm most
    > interested in Linux (Debian and Suse), Mac OS X, ActiveState, and
    > Cygwin.
    >


    With Win32 the install location is dependent upon options that you specify
    in the Win32/Makefile when you build
    perl. (Worth browsing through the configurable section of the
    Makefile/Makefile.mk to see what's there.) Wrt ActiveState perl, as you
    probably know, it installs into something like C:/perl. You can also build a
    perl on Win32 that installs into something like C:/perl/5.8.7 by specifying
    (in the Win32/Makefile) that you want your perl to be versioned. Here's what
    the Makefile contains:

    -------------------------------
    #
    # Comment this out if you DON'T want your perl installation to be versioned.
    # This means that the new installation will overwrite any files from the
    # old installation at the same INST_TOP location. Leaving it enabled is
    # the safest route, as perl adds the extra version directory to all the
    # locations it installs files to. If you disable it, an alternative
    # versioned installation can be obtained by setting INST_TOP above to a
    # path that includes an arbitrary version string.
    #
    #INST_VER = \5.8.7
    -----------------------------

    ActiveState, by leaving the Makefile like that, ensure that perl installs
    into a non-versioned location (eg C:/perl).
    Include that line, however, and perl will install into a versioned location
    (eg C:/perl/5.8.7).

    For nix type operating systems, the INSTALL file that ships with the perl
    source would be a good reference. See also (in the perl source) the
    README.OS files (where "OS" stands for a number of specific operating
    systems - 'cygwin', 'win32', etc).

    Hth.

    Cheers,
    Rob
    Sisyphus, Oct 9, 2005
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  3. kj

    kj Guest

    In <434875cc$0$2135$> "Sisyphus" <> writes:

    >"kj" <> wrote in message
    >news:di9q3c$b7m$...
    >>
    >> Where is the standard structure for Perl directories and files
    >> documented? I have seen many variants (e.g. /usr/lib/perl5
    >> or /usr/lib/perl/5.8.6, etc.)
    >>
    >> I suppose the answer to this question is OS-dependent. I'm most
    >> interested in Linux (Debian and Suse), Mac OS X, ActiveState, and
    >> Cygwin.
    >>


    >With Win32 the install location is dependent upon options that you specify
    >in the Win32/Makefile when you build
    >perl. (Worth browsing through the configurable section of the
    >Makefile/Makefile.mk to see what's there.) Wrt ActiveState perl, as you
    >probably know, it installs into something like C:/perl. You can also build a
    >perl on Win32 that installs into something like C:/perl/5.8.7 by specifying
    >(in the Win32/Makefile) that you want your perl to be versioned. Here's what
    >the Makefile contains:


    >-------------------------------
    >#
    ># Comment this out if you DON'T want your perl installation to be versioned.
    ># This means that the new installation will overwrite any files from the
    ># old installation at the same INST_TOP location. Leaving it enabled is
    ># the safest route, as perl adds the extra version directory to all the
    ># locations it installs files to. If you disable it, an alternative
    ># versioned installation can be obtained by setting INST_TOP above to a
    ># path that includes an arbitrary version string.
    >#
    >#INST_VER = \5.8.7
    >-----------------------------


    >ActiveState, by leaving the Makefile like that, ensure that perl installs
    >into a non-versioned location (eg C:/perl).
    >Include that line, however, and perl will install into a versioned location
    >(eg C:/perl/5.8.7).


    >For nix type operating systems, the INSTALL file that ships with the perl
    >source would be a good reference. See also (in the perl source) the
    >README.OS files (where "OS" stands for a number of specific operating
    >systems - 'cygwin', 'win32', etc).



    Thanks, that's good to know.

    kj

    --
    NOTE: In my address everything before the first period is backwards;
    and the last period, and everything after it, should be discarded.
    kj, Oct 9, 2005
    #3
  4. kj

    Guest

    Abigail <> wrote:
    > kj () wrote on MMMMCDXXII September MCMXCIII in
    > <URL:news:di9q3c$b7m$>:
    > []
    > [] Where is the standard structure for Perl directories and files
    > [] documented? I have seen many variants (e.g. /usr/lib/perl5
    > [] or /usr/lib/perl/5.8.6, etc.)
    >
    > In the file called INSTALL that comes with the tarball. (Where else?)
    >
    > But there's no ISO standard for Perl, or for its installation
    > directories.


    That threw me for a loop for a while, too. But I think ISO means "in
    search of", not "international standards organization".

    Xho

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    , Oct 9, 2005
    #4
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