J2EE, Spring, Hibernate, EJB .... what the ???

Discussion in 'Java' started by swebb99@gmail.com, Dec 8, 2009.

  1. Guest

    Hi,

    I'm a J2SE developer who has been working on gui application forever
    and I've decided that I need to learn a bit about the other side of
    the fence, what goes on in the server side. The problem I'm having at
    the moment is that I just can't see the wood from the tree's. I really
    can't figure out what all the different bits of technology are for,
    how they fit together, which ones compete. I've seen JSP's, EJB's,
    Spring, Hibernate and lots of other technology referred to but I can't
    seem to find anything that attempts to give a quick overview of
    everything, its place in the world, the pro's/con's and so on.

    As far as I can tell at the moment Hibernate hides away the low level
    JDBC and relational aspects, EJB also provides similar functionality
    but requires a server, Spring is a framework that links various
    technology together, JSP are to be used for handling web
    pages ........... the is just so much to take in, I really need an
    idiots guide just so I can figure out what I really need to read up
    on.

    Any they say swing is complicated !!!

    Thanks for any advice

    Steve
    , Dec 8, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Arne Vajhøj Guest

    wrote:
    > I'm a J2SE developer who has been working on gui application forever
    > and I've decided that I need to learn a bit about the other side of
    > the fence, what goes on in the server side. The problem I'm having at
    > the moment is that I just can't see the wood from the tree's. I really
    > can't figure out what all the different bits of technology are for,
    > how they fit together, which ones compete. I've seen JSP's, EJB's,
    > Spring, Hibernate and lots of other technology referred to but I can't
    > seem to find anything that attempts to give a quick overview of
    > everything, its place in the world, the pro's/con's and so on.
    >
    > As far as I can tell at the moment Hibernate hides away the low level
    > JDBC and relational aspects, EJB also provides similar functionality
    > but requires a server, Spring is a framework that links various
    > technology together, JSP are to be used for handling web
    > pages ........... the is just so much to take in, I really need an
    > idiots guide just so I can figure out what I really need to read up
    > on.
    >
    > Any they say swing is complicated !!!


    The entire Java EE stack is pretty big.

    1) Very short version:

    Hibernate = O/R-Mapper (and can be used in Java SE as well)
    Spring = IoC framework (and can be used in Java SE as well)
    EJB's = components used in business logic layer
    JSP = template system used in presentation layer
    Servlet = typically used for controllers in control layer
    JCA = adapters for external systems
    JSF = component based presentation and control layer build on JSP (and
    servlet)

    2) Short version

    Lookup the above items at Wikipedia.

    3) Medium version

    Read SUN's Java EE tutorial.

    4) Long version.

    Download the specs (as PDF files) and read them.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Dec 9, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Lew Guest

    Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > The entire Java EE stack is pretty big.
    >
    > 1) Very short version:
    >
    > Hibernate = O/R-Mapper (and can be used in Java SE as well)
    > Spring = IoC framework (and can be used in Java SE as well)
    > EJB's = components used in business logic layer
    > JSP = template system used in presentation layer
    > Servlet = typically used for controllers in control layer
    > JCA = adapters for external systems
    > JSF = component based presentation and control layer build on JSP (and
    > servlet)
    >
    > 2) Short version
    >
    > Lookup the above items at Wikipedia.
    >
    > 3) Medium version
    >
    > Read SUN's Java EE tutorial.
    >
    > 4) Long version.
    >
    > Download the specs (as PDF files) and read them.


    Playing with actual deployment is worthwhile, too. Start light - just, say,
    Tomcat with an IDE like Eclipse or NetBeans or whatever. This gives you some
    of the Java EE stack, and you can mix in features like JPA with Hibernate
    JARs, JSF, and quite a bit of the other interesting things. The rest of the
    Java EE load comes in free downloads like GlassFish, JBoss and Apache
    Geronimo, that rival the big guns like WebSphere. I've found multi-core
    platforms with gobs of RAM to be helpful with full-fledged Java EE servers.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Dec 9, 2009
    #3
  4. Roedy Green Guest

    On Tue, 8 Dec 2009 13:57:59 -0800 (PST), ""
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who
    said :

    >EJB's,
    >Spring, Hibernate and lots of other technology referred to but I can't
    >seem to find anything that attempts to give a quick overview of
    >everything, its place in the world, the pro's/con's and so on.


    If you look up a word in the Java glossary it will give you a couple
    of sentences to tell you what it is for. This information is
    carefully hidden on the websites devoted to the worship of that
    particular program, after the manner of the mystery rites of Dionysus.

    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html

    see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/ee.html for an overview of all the
    pieces of EE (nee J2EE).
    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
    http://mindprod.com
    The future has already happened, it just isn’t evenly distributed.
    ~ William Gibson (born: 1948-03-17 age: 61)
    Roedy Green, Dec 9, 2009
    #4
  5. markspace Guest

    wrote:

    > As far as I can tell at the moment Hibernate hides away the low level
    > JDBC and relational aspects, EJB also provides similar functionality
    > but requires a server, Spring is a framework that links various
    > technology together, JSP are to be used for handling web
    > pages ........... the is just so much to take in, I really need an



    Yes, the JEE stack is huge. I don't program in JEE regularily so I
    can't give expert advice here.

    However, one book I got for myself helped a lot. O'Reilly's Head First
    Servlet and JSP is a pretty good intro to just the Servlet part of the
    spec. I think that's where you should start.

    Learn the Servlets, they're the basis for everything else. There's even
    a small section in the book about frameworks like Struts, which gives
    you a lead in to other frameworks like Spring too.
    markspace, Dec 9, 2009
    #5
  6. Guest

    Re: J2EE, Spring, Hibernate, EJB .... what the ???

    On 9 Dec, 01:24, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > I'm a J2SE developer who has been working on gui application forever
    > > and I've decided that I need to learn a bit about the other side of
    > > the fence, what goes on in the server side. The problem I'm having at
    > > the moment is that I just can't see the wood from the tree's. I really
    > > can't figure out what all the different bits of technology are for,
    > > how they fit together, which ones compete. I've seen JSP's, EJB's,
    > > Spring, Hibernate and lots of other technology referred to but I can't
    > > seem to find anything that attempts to give a quick overview of
    > > everything, its place in the world, the pro's/con's and so on.

    >
    > > As far as I can tell at the moment Hibernate hides away the low level
    > > JDBC and relational aspects, EJB also provides similar functionality
    > > but requires a server, Spring is a framework that links various
    > > technology together, JSP are to be used for handling web
    > > pages ........... the is just so much to take in, I really need an
    > > idiots guide just so I can figure out what I really need to read up
    > > on.

    >
    > > Any they say swing is complicated !!!

    >
    > The entire Java EE stack is pretty big.
    >
    > 1) Very short version:
    >
    > Hibernate = O/R-Mapper (and can be used in Java SE as well)
    > Spring = IoC framework (and can be used in Java SE as well)
    > EJB's = components used in business logic layer
    > JSP = template system used in presentation layer
    > Servlet = typically used for controllers in control layer
    > JCA = adapters for external systems
    > JSF = component based presentation and control layer build on JSP (and
    > servlet)
    >
    > 2) Short version
    >
    > Lookup the above items at Wikipedia.
    >
    > 3) Medium version
    >
    > Read SUN's Java EE tutorial.
    >
    > 4) Long version.
    >
    > Download the specs (as PDF files) and read them.
    >
    > Arne


    Great thanks Arne that ties in roughly with what I thought, at least I
    know kind of what aspects each is dealing with now, I'll have a read
    around each.

    Steve
    , Dec 9, 2009
    #6
  7. Guest

    Re: J2EE, Spring, Hibernate, EJB .... what the ???


    > Playing with actual deployment is worthwhile, too.  Start light - just, say,
    > Tomcat with an IDE like Eclipse or NetBeans or whatever.  This gives you some
    > of the Java EE stack, and you can mix in features like JPA with Hibernate
    > JARs, JSF, and quite a bit of the other interesting things.  The rest of the
    > Java EE load comes in free downloads like GlassFish, JBoss and Apache
    > Geronimo, that rival the big guns like WebSphere.  I've found multi-core
    > platforms with gobs of RAM to be helpful with full-fledged Java EE servers.
    >
    > --
    > Lew


    Good idea Lew I'll have a dig around the Netbeans Tutorials and see
    what they give me.

    Thanks

    Steve
    , Dec 9, 2009
    #7
  8. Guest

    Re: J2EE, Spring, Hibernate, EJB .... what the ???


    > Seehttp://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html
    >
    > seehttp://mindprod.com/jgloss/ee.htmlfor an overview of all the
    > pieces of EE (nee J2EE).
    > --
    > Roedy Green Canadian Mind Productshttp://mindprod.com
    > The future has already happened, it just isn’t evenly distributed.
    > ~ William Gibson (born: 1948-03-17 age: 61)


    Great links William I'm sure they will come in handy for this and
    other stuff !

    Thanks

    Steve
    , Dec 9, 2009
    #8
  9. Guest

    Re: J2EE, Spring, Hibernate, EJB .... what the ???


    > However, one book I got for myself helped a lot.  O'Reilly's Head First
    > Servlet and JSP is a pretty good intro to just the Servlet part of the
    > spec.  I think that's where you should start.
    >
    > Learn the Servlets, they're the basis for everything else.  There's even
    > a small section in the book about frameworks like Struts, which gives
    > you a lead in to other frameworks like Spring too.


    I'll check out he book Mark and have a look into servlets thanks for
    the tip.

    Steve
    , Dec 9, 2009
    #9
  10. Guest

    Re: J2EE, Spring, Hibernate, EJB .... what the ???


    > However, one book I got for myself helped a lot.  O'Reilly's Head First
    > Servlet and JSP is a pretty good intro to just the Servlet part of the
    > spec.  I think that's where you should start.
    >
    > Learn the Servlets, they're the basis for everything else.  There's even
    > a small section in the book about frameworks like Struts, which gives
    > you a lead in to other frameworks like Spring too.


    I'll check out he book Mark and have a look into servlets thanks for
    the tip.

    Steve
    , Dec 9, 2009
    #10
  11. markspace wrote:
    > wrote:
    >
    >> As far as I can tell at the moment Hibernate hides away the low level
    >> JDBC and relational aspects, EJB also provides similar functionality
    >> but requires a server, Spring is a framework that links various
    >> technology together, JSP are to be used for handling web
    >> pages ........... the is just so much to take in, I really need an

    >
    >
    > Yes, the JEE stack is huge. I don't program in JEE regularily so I
    > can't give expert advice here.
    >
    > However, one book I got for myself helped a lot. O'Reilly's Head First
    > Servlet and JSP is a pretty good intro to just the Servlet part of the
    > spec. I think that's where you should start.
    >
    > Learn the Servlets, they're the basis for everything else. There's even
    > a small section in the book about frameworks like Struts, which gives
    > you a lead in to other frameworks like Spring too.


    I agree. It's basically all about web apps, and in J2EE web apps centre
    on servlets. JSPs compile into servlets. In JSF everything else hangs
    off a front controller servlet (the FacesServlet). Java web services
    typically compile into session EJBs or...you guessed it...servlets.
    Spring MVC has a DispatcherServlet.

    Other aspects of J2EE come in because of practical needs - talking to
    databases (JDBC/entity EJB/JPA/entity
    bean/Hibernate/EclipseLink/iBatis), business logic encapsulation
    (session EJBs), implementing security, looking up things so you can use
    them (JNDI), messaging (JMS), implementing transactions (JTA) and so forth.

    One thing to keep in mind, which could be important depending on which
    books or articles you read and when they were written, is that the
    architectural picture of J2EE has changed quite a lot since its
    inception, and also in the last few years. I won't go so far as to say
    that anything older than 2 or 3 years is necessarily obsolete, but my
    recommendation would be, take your lead from some of the "canonical"
    documentation like the Java EE 5 tutorial (*), and pay attention to what
    specification versions are involved. And also, be aware that J2EE
    doesn't automatically mean that you need full-fledged EJBs: that's never
    been the case, strictly speaking, but up until not so long ago most
    anyone writing a big app tended to think that an EJB container _had_ to
    be involved. This is no longer a given.

    AHS

    * there are big changes between J2EE 1.4 and Java EE 5. No small number
    of us still have to support the earlier version. But since you're
    starting afresh, stick to 5, and be aware that 6 is soon upon us. :)
    Arved Sandstrom, Dec 9, 2009
    #11
  12. Guest

    Re: J2EE, Spring, Hibernate, EJB .... what the ???


    > I agree. It's basically all about web apps, and in J2EE web apps centre
    > on servlets. JSPs compile into servlets. In JSF everything else hangs
    > off a front controller servlet (the FacesServlet). Java web services
    > typically compile into session EJBs or...you guessed it...servlets.
    > Spring MVC has a DispatcherServlet.
    >
    > Other aspects of J2EE come in because of practical needs - talking to
    > databases (JDBC/entity EJB/JPA/entity
    > bean/Hibernate/EclipseLink/iBatis), business logic encapsulation
    > (session EJBs), implementing security, looking up things so you can use
    > them (JNDI), messaging (JMS), implementing transactions (JTA) and so forth.
    >
    > One thing to keep in mind, which could be important depending on which
    > books or articles you read and when they were written, is that the
    > architectural picture of J2EE has changed quite a lot since its
    > inception, and also in the last few years. I won't go so far as to say
    > that anything older than 2 or 3 years is necessarily obsolete, but my
    > recommendation would be, take your lead from some of the "canonical"
    > documentation like the Java EE 5 tutorial (*), and pay attention to what
    > specification versions are involved. And also, be aware that J2EE
    > doesn't automatically mean that you need full-fledged EJBs: that's never
    > been the case, strictly speaking, but up until not so long ago most
    > anyone writing a big app tended to think that an EJB container _had_ to
    > be involved. This is no longer a given.
    >
    > AHS
    >
    > * there are big changes between J2EE 1.4 and Java EE 5. No small number
    > of us still have to support the earlier version. But since you're
    > starting afresh, stick to 5, and be aware that 6 is soon upon us. :)


    Great thanks Arved thats been a help, I'm finally getting my head
    around how all this stuff fits in now. I think I'm in the same boat as
    people who start using low level swing for the first time, I start
    talking about table sorters, cell rendering, strokes and so on and I
    get blank looks for the first couple of weeks ;)

    I suppose most people learn this stuff on job where other people are
    around to ask or maybe at college. With just myself and no one else to
    ask I'm obviously taking the hard route but I've got to learn sometime
    as it will be easier to find work if I have an understanding of
    backend and web java development and not just front end gui
    development (I've written lots of server processes though but using
    only J2SE technology).

    Thanks again

    Steve
    , Dec 9, 2009
    #12
  13. Tom Anderson Guest

    On Tue, 8 Dec 2009, wrote:

    > I'm a J2SE developer who has been working on gui application forever and
    > I've decided that I need to learn a bit about the other side of the
    > fence, what goes on in the server side. The problem I'm having at the
    > moment is that I just can't see the wood from the tree's. I really can't
    > figure out what all the different bits of technology are for, how they
    > fit together, which ones compete.


    Welcome to the force, son.

    tom

    --
    an optical recording release. copyright digitally mastered. .,
    Tom Anderson, Dec 9, 2009
    #13
  14. Guest

    Re: J2EE, Spring, Hibernate, EJB .... what the ???

    On 9 Dec, 15:57, Tom Anderson <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 8 Dec 2009, wrote:
    > > I'm a J2SE developer who has been working on gui application forever and
    > > I've decided that I need to learn a bit about the other side of the
    > > fence, what goes on in the server side. The problem I'm having at the
    > > moment is that I just can't see the wood from the tree's. I really can't
    > > figure out what all the different bits of technology are for, how they
    > > fit together, which ones compete.

    >
    > Welcome to the force, son.
    >
    > tom
    >
    > --
    > an optical recording release. copyright digitally mastered. .,


    Lol thanks Tom, at the minute I'm waving a tube around with a blind
    fold on, one day I'll hit something with it ;)
    , Dec 9, 2009
    #14
  15. Roedy Green Guest

    Re: J2EE, Spring, Hibernate, EJB .... what the ???

    On Wed, 9 Dec 2009 00:27:43 -0800 (PST), ""
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who
    said :

    >> Roedy Green Canadian Mind Productshttp://mindprod.com
    >> The future has already happened, it just isn’t evenly distributed.
    >> ~ William Gibson (born: 1948-03-17 age: 61)

    >
    >Great links William I'm sure they will come in handy for this and
    >other stuff !


    I'm Roedy. William is a sci fi author I quoted.
    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
    http://mindprod.com
    The future has already happened, it just isn’t evenly distributed.
    ~ William Gibson (born: 1948-03-17 age: 61)
    Roedy Green, Dec 11, 2009
    #15
  16. Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 09-12-2009 00:58, markspace wrote:
    > wrote:
    >> As far as I can tell at the moment Hibernate hides away the low level
    >> JDBC and relational aspects, EJB also provides similar functionality
    >> but requires a server, Spring is a framework that links various
    >> technology together, JSP are to be used for handling web
    >> pages ........... the is just so much to take in, I really need an

    >
    > Yes, the JEE stack is huge. I don't program in JEE regularily so I can't
    > give expert advice here.
    >
    > However, one book I got for myself helped a lot. O'Reilly's Head First
    > Servlet and JSP is a pretty good intro to just the Servlet part of the
    > spec. I think that's where you should start.
    >
    > Learn the Servlets, they're the basis for everything else. There's even
    > a small section in the book about frameworks like Struts, which gives
    > you a lead in to other frameworks like Spring too.


    I would not spend too much time on servlets.

    Very little Java EE work actually involves writing servlets
    yourself.

    And the stuff you need to know about servlets are relative
    easy to learn.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Dec 13, 2009
    #16
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    429
  2. Replies:
    11
    Views:
    36,283
    Timo Stamm
    Mar 13, 2006
  3. rmn190
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    2,334
    Arne Vajhøj
    Jan 10, 2008
  4. Amit Jain
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    3,269
    Amit Jain
    Apr 27, 2009
  5. Raymond Schanks
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    640
    Raymond Schanks
    Aug 3, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page