Java Certification Exam Query

Discussion in 'Java' started by AK, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. AK

    AK Guest

    Hi friends,
    This is my first post in a newsgroup. I am planning to appear for the SCJP
    exam for Java 5 in mid-march. I wish to know about the industry
    recognition for the same. As I donot have any traditional workexperience
    will it be useful in establishing my proficiency.
    kind regards
    AK

    --

    SDF Public Access UNIX System - http://sdf.lonestar.org
     
    AK, Feb 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. AK

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 5 Feb, 09:37, AK <> wrote:
    >I am planning to appear for the SCJP exam for Java 5 in mid-march.
    > I wish to know about the industry recognition for the same.


    This exam series, along with the Cisco networking certifications, are
    just about the only industry accreditations that have much recognition
    or any respect at all. They're certainly in a league above MCSE or
    CIW.
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. AK

    AK Guest

    On Mon, 5 Feb 2007, Andy Dingley wrote:

    Andy,
    Thanks a lot for your reply. But I came to know that there is no
    distinction between the candidates who clear the exam (as in a person
    securing 85% and the one sceuring 58% are on the same level).
    kind regards
    AK

    > On 5 Feb, 09:37, AK <> wrote:
    >> I am planning to appear for the SCJP exam for Java 5 in mid-march.
    >> I wish to know about the industry recognition for the same.

    >
    > This exam series, along with the Cisco networking certifications, are
    > just about the only industry accreditations that have much recognition
    > or any respect at all. They're certainly in a league above MCSE or
    > CIW.
    >
    >


    --

    SDF Public Access UNIX System - http://sdf.lonestar.org
     
    AK, Feb 5, 2007
    #3
  4. Andy Dingley <> wrote:
    > On 5 Feb, 09:37, AK <> wrote:
    >>I am planning to appear for the SCJP exam for Java 5 in mid-march.
    >> I wish to know about the industry recognition for the same.


    > This exam series, along with the Cisco networking certifications, are
    > just about the only industry accreditations that have much recognition
    > or any respect at all. They're certainly in a league above MCSE or
    > CIW.


    That might be true, but it would be interesting to see some objective
    comparison, e.g., a survey with some numbers. Newsgroup postings tend
    to lack that (and it's indisputable that he would get a different answer
    by posting in a different newsgroup).

    --
    Thomas E. Dickey
    http://invisible-island.net
    ftp://invisible-island.net
     
    Thomas Dickey, Feb 5, 2007
    #4
  5. AK

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 5 Feb, 13:25, Thomas Dickey <> wrote:

    > That might be true, but it would be interesting to see some objective
    > comparison, e.g., a survey with some numbers.


    For a sample of one, my employer's policy is to buy team drinks and "a
    sliding scale of meal venues: Mc Donalds for /SCJP up to Michelin 3
    Star for /SCEA " for Java, but nothing for MCSE.
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 5, 2007
    #5
  6. On Feb 5, 6:21 pm, AK <> wrote:
    > On Mon, 5 Feb 2007, Andy Dingley wrote:
    >
    > Andy,
    > Thanks a lot for your reply. But I came to know that there is no
    > distinction between the candidates who clear the exam (as in a person
    > securing 85% and the one sceuring 58% are on the same level).
    > kind regards
    > AK
    >
    > > On 5 Feb, 09:37, AK <> wrote:
    > >> I am planning to appear for the SCJP exam for Java 5 in mid-march.
    > >> I wish to know about the industry recognition for the same.

    >
    > > This exam series, along with the Cisco networking certifications, are
    > > just about the only industry accreditations that have much recognition
    > > or any respect at all. They're certainly in a league above MCSE or
    > > CIW.

    >
    > --
    >
    > SDF Public Access UNIX System -http://sdf.lonestar.org


    Hi,

    You are right, there is no distinction between the person who gets 85%
    and 58%. The test is planned in such a way...if u r able to clear the
    exam with minimum pass percentage 52% means...then u r eligible to
    work in java...

    Certification will not have that much impact ....i will explain this
    with my personal experience..i am scjp, brainbench, OCA...guy...these
    certification helps my cv to be shortlisted in interviews.....even
    though i have certification...they conducted tech interviews but in a
    different way...they didnt asked me any stupid questions on java like
    size of double, what is encapsulation, what is oops......rather than
    they asked me some practical q's like structure of JVM, algorithm and
    working of JVM, why we are going for OOPS rather than strucutured/
    procedure language..diff between JDK, JRE,and so on..

    Certifications will help u in the final selection in considering u to
    be the right person for the job...
    say two people came to the interview...one has got 2+ exp and
    certifications, other guy got 2.5+ and no certification....

    if both person did the tech interview well and package is also some
    wat similar..then the candidate precendence will increase for
    certified person..company will consider the certified guy bcoz they
    think that person is ready to allocate some time for his own
    development.......that will make the difference

    Thanks
    moin
     
    Proton Projects - Moin, Feb 6, 2007
    #6
  7. AK

    arun Guest

    certification is an added advantage.It will be always useful .
     
    arun, Feb 6, 2007
    #7
  8. AK

    Guest

    Hi AK,
    Just one thing i want to say to you that you must look at once the
    java specification tutorial before appearing in the exam.
    You can get it from http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/second_edition.
    Because it will tell you a lot of things that you may not be knowing.
    For an example just tell the output of the following program :-
    class Super {
    Super() {
    printThree();
    }

    void printThree() {
    System.out.println("three");
    }
    }

    class Test extends Super {
    int three = (int)Math.PI; // That is, 3
    public static void main(String[] args){
    Test t = new Test();
    t.printThree();
    }
    void printThree() { System.out.println(three); }
    }
     
    , Feb 6, 2007
    #8
  9. AK

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 5 Feb, 13:21, AK <> wrote:

    > Thanks a lot for your reply. But I came to know that there is no
    > distinction between the candidates who clear the exam (as in a person
    > securing 85% and the one sceuring 58% are on the same level).


    Moin said it well. You only get "certified", not "highly certified".
    It doesn't distinguish good Java people, it distinguishes the average
    and keen from the bad and from the average but less keen.

    Recruiting is hard work. One easy way to filter out the poor
    candidates is to simply paper-sort the certified from the non-
    certified. I know this will probably lose my best candidates (they
    don't feel any need to get certified) but it also filters out the huge
    number of applicants who don't know Unix from eunuchs. This saves me,
    as a manager, an awful lot of effort! Until you've done recruitment
    yourself, you wouldn't believe the high proportion of clueless idiots
    who apply anyway. Most of "recruitment" is sadly about avoiding
    idiots in favour of the acceptably competent, not about selecting the
    very best people. For "best" I'd only trust long personal experience
    of that one candidate, or similar experience of colleagues who'd
    worked with them before.

    If I were putting a start-up together, then I'd want the very best
    people (not many of them) and I'd recruit solely by personal
    recommendation of who was really good. If I'm trying to find 3 more
    warm bodies for a gas-bill shop, then I'd just only recruit certified
    programmers.

    If I'm being interviewed and I have some relevant certification, I
    _never_ mention it.
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 6, 2007
    #9
  10. AK

    AK Guest

    Moin,
    Thanks a lot for the insight. Now I am clearly understand the value of the
    SCJP.
    kind regards
    AK
    --

    SDF Public Access UNIX System - http://sdf.lonestar.org
     
    AK, Feb 6, 2007
    #10
  11. AK

    AK Guest

    On Tue, 6 Feb 2007, wrote:

    > Date: 6 Feb 2007 01:28:58 -0800
    > From: "" <>
    > Newsgroups: comp.lang.java.programmer
    > Subject: Re: Java Certification Exam Query
    >
    > Hi AK,
    > Just one thing i want to say to you that you must look at once the
    > java specification tutorial before appearing in the exam.
    > You can get it from http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/second_edition.
    > Because it will tell you a lot of things that you may not be knowing.


    Thanks Agarwal, Will definitely go through that.


    For an example just tell the output of the following program :-
    class Super {
    Super() {
    printThree();
    }

    void printThree() {
    System.out.println("three");
    }
    }

    class Test extends Super {
    int three = (int)Math.PI; // That is, 3
    public static void main(String[] args){
    Test t = new Test();
    t.printThree();
    }
    void printThree() { System.out.println(three); }
    }



    This question sure seems to be a toughie. Let me go ahead reasoning rather
    than jumping to answers. The object t is calling the function prinThree().
    In a normal case the subclass function function is called and the value 3
    is printed. but here the object for the superclass is first created and
    hence its cosntructor is called which inturn calls its own printThree()
    function. So first "three" is printed first and then ater the object is
    created the subclasses' function is called.

    the output should be
    "three"
    3

    correct me if I am wrong

    kind regards
    AK

    --

    SDF Public Access UNIX System - http://sdf.lonestar.org
     
    AK, Feb 6, 2007
    #11
  12. AK

    AK Guest


    > For a sample of one, my employer's policy is to buy team drinks and "a
    > sliding scale of meal venues: Mc Donalds for /SCJP up to Michelin 3
    > Star for /SCEA " for Java, but nothing for MCSE.


    thats was quite a witty way of proving the point.

    --

    SDF Public Access UNIX System - http://sdf.lonestar.org
     
    AK, Feb 6, 2007
    #12
  13. AK

    AK Guest

    On Tue, 6 Feb 2007, arun wrote:

    > Date: 6 Feb 2007 01:23:37 -0800
    > From: arun <>
    > Newsgroups: comp.lang.java.programmer
    > Subject: Re: Java Certification Exam Query
    >
    > certification is an added advantage.It will be always useful .
    >
    >


    thats a valid point. its always to have something rather than npothing.
    but my query was if it was really worth the effort and time. and the
    unanimous answer has been YES.
    :)
    --

    SDF Public Access UNIX System - http://sdf.lonestar.org
     
    AK, Feb 6, 2007
    #13
  14. AK

    AK Guest

    On Tue, 6 Feb 2007, Andy Dingley wrote:
    > Moin said it well. You only get "certified", not "highly certified".
    > It doesn't distinguish good Java people, it distinguishes the average
    > and keen from the bad and from the average but less keen.


    Yup!..Both of you have put it nicely. It will prove a point and may be
    help in filtering resumes but nothing more than that. The example of
    recruiter and the flood of applications was indeed quite good. Now I get
    it.


    > If I were putting a start-up together, then I'd want the very best
    > people (not many of them) and I'd recruit solely by personal
    > recommendation of who was really good. If I'm trying to find 3 more
    > warm bodies for a gas-bill shop, then I'd just only recruit certified
    > programmers.
    >
    > If I'm being interviewed and I have some relevant certification, I
    > _never_ mention it.


    :p

    --

    SDF Public Access UNIX System - http://sdf.lonestar.org
     
    AK, Feb 6, 2007
    #14
  15. AK <> wrote:


    >> For a sample of one, my employer's policy is to buy team drinks and "a
    >> sliding scale of meal venues: Mc Donalds for /SCJP up to Michelin 3
    >> Star for /SCEA " for Java, but nothing for MCSE.


    > thats was quite a witty way of proving the point.


    Not really. It was obviously intended as a topic-killer
    (no reason to followup).

    --
    Thomas E. Dickey
    http://invisible-island.net
    ftp://invisible-island.net
     
    Thomas Dickey, Feb 6, 2007
    #15
  16. AK

    Guest

    By the way the answer to my code snippet is :-
    0
    3
     
    , Feb 6, 2007
    #16
  17. AK

    AK Guest

    On Tue, 6 Feb 2007, wrote:

    > Date: 6 Feb 2007 03:29:25 -0800
    > From: "" <>
    > Newsgroups: comp.lang.java.programmer
    > Subject: Re: Java Certification Exam Query
    >
    > By the way the answer to my code snippet is :-
    > 0
    > 3
    >
    >


    I had posted the answer as :
    "three"
    3

    Can you lease go through my earlier post and point out where i might have
    gone wrong.

    kind regards
    AK
    --

    SDF Public Access UNIX System - http://sdf.lonestar.org
     
    AK, Feb 6, 2007
    #17
  18. AK

    Lew Guest

    Proton Projects - Moin wrote:
    > ... u r ... u r ... i ... i ... q's ... u ... u ... 2+ exp ... bcoz ...


    Informal communications as here are one thing, but in one's professional
    writing one should be sure to eschew "txt-speak" execrations. Taking the care
    to communicate well will enhance one's career.

    The English language is a lovely thing and is not improved by uncessarily
    telegraphic communication.

    - Lew
     
    Lew, Feb 6, 2007
    #18
  19. AK

    AK Guest

    On Tue, 6 Feb 2007, Lew wrote:

    > Date: Tue, 06 Feb 2007 09:01:28 -0500
    > From: Lew <>
    > Newsgroups: comp.lang.java.programmer
    > Subject: Re: Java Certification Exam Query
    >
    > Proton Projects - Moin wrote:
    >> ... u r ... u r ... i ... i ... q's ... u ... u ... 2+ exp ... bcoz ...

    >
    > Informal communications as here are one thing, but in one's professional
    > writing one should be sure to eschew "txt-speak" execrations. Taking the care
    > to communicate well will enhance one's career.
    >
    > The English language is a lovely thing and is not improved by uncessarily
    > telegraphic communication.
    >
    > - Lew


    Lew,
    I do agree with your point of view that one should refrain from using the
    SMS-CHAT lingo of i,ur,coz etc but at the same time I feel one should not
    force ones opinions opinions on ohters.We live in a democratic world and
    USENET is an example of that. And the only thing thats permanent in life
    is change. If the majority of the people want the language to change,adapt
    and improve with time; who are we to dictate terms.
    kind regards
    AK

    --

    SDF Public Access UNIX System - http://sdf.lonestar.org
     
    AK, Feb 6, 2007
    #19
  20. AK

    Chris Uppal Guest

    AK wrote:

    > If the majority of the people want the language to change,adapt
    > and improve with time; who are we to dictate terms.


    The implicit suggestion that txt-speakers are in the majority /in this
    community/ is more than a little unconvincing.

    And to answer your final question (note how I refrain from criticising your
    omission of the "?" ;-) we are the /readers/ -- and if people wish to
    communicate with us then (a) they are well-advised to consider our tastes and
    prejudices (even if, after consideration, they decide to ignore them), and (b)
    we can help them do (a) if we /tell/ them what those tastes and prejudices are.

    Personally I can't read txt-speke without considerable difficulty (it changes
    the "gestalt" of the written word, which my word recognition wetware depends
    on), so I hardly ever bother. So, if there's anyone who would like a share of
    /my/ attention, they had better use real words...

    -- chris
     
    Chris Uppal, Feb 6, 2007
    #20
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