Java digits pronunciation

Discussion in 'Java' started by Stefan Ram, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. Stefan Ram

    Stefan Ram Guest

    In a Java programming class in Sunnyvale (U.S.A.), how would

    0.01

    usually be pronounced?

    nought point oh one?
    Stefan Ram, Jan 18, 2013
    #1
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  2. Stefan Ram

    markspace Guest

    On 1/18/2013 10:37 AM, Stefan Ram wrote:
    > In a Java programming class in Sunnyvale (U.S.A.), how would
    >
    > 0.01
    >
    > usually be pronounced?
    >
    > nought point oh one?
    >


    "Point zero one," or "one one-hundredth," is how I'd pronounce it.
    Maybe "zero point zero one." "Oh" is OK too in place of "zero."

    Americans do not use "nought." In fact my spell checker flags it as a
    misspelling.
    markspace, Jan 18, 2013
    #2
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  3. Stefan Ram

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    On 1/18/13 10:48 AM, markspace wrote:
    > On 1/18/2013 10:37 AM, Stefan Ram wrote:
    >> In a Java programming class in Sunnyvale (U.S.A.), how would
    >>
    >> 0.01
    >>
    >> usually be pronounced?
    >>
    >> nought point oh one?
    >>

    >
    > "Point zero one," or "one one-hundredth," is how I'd pronounce it. Maybe
    > "zero point zero one." "Oh" is OK too in place of "zero."
    >
    > Americans do not use "nought." In fact my spell checker flags it as a
    > misspelling.


    I would either says "zero point zero one". Though it depends on the
    full context. For example, in phone numbers, I'm likely to say "oh" for
    zeros.

    Also, for periods which aren't decimal points, I'm likely to use "dot"
    instead of "point". For example "version 1.02" I would say "one point
    oh two"

    This is my own way of doing it, I'm not sure how standard that is.
    Daniel Pitts, Jan 18, 2013
    #3
  4. Stefan Ram

    Stefan Ram Guest

    Daniel Pitts <> writes:
    >I would either says "zero point zero one". Though it depends on the
    >full context. For example, in phone numbers, I'm likely to say "oh" for
    >zeros.


    I live in Berlin (Germany), and - in fact - today a woman
    was sitting near me in a bus who was speaking American
    English, and I heard her using »oh« as she was giving
    (spelling) a phone number, which reminded me to ask here
    about how to pronounce »0«.

    In fact, in another bus, later, I heard another person, a
    boy, speaking English in an American way, who said »What did
    he do/say?« (or something like this) pronounced as »What did
    he do slash say?« - I never heard this use of »slash« before!
    So on a bus ride in Berlin you can learn something
    about American English as well as about several other
    languages ... (Sometimes I enjoy sitting near persons
    speaking italian).
    Stefan Ram, Jan 18, 2013
    #4
  5. Stefan Ram

    Tim Slattery Guest

    -berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:


    > In fact, in another bus, later, I heard another person, a
    > boy, speaking English in an American way, who said »What did
    > he do/say?« (or something like this) pronounced as »What did
    > he do slash say?« - I never heard this use of »slash« before!


    IM(NS)HO, that's ugly. It's certainly not typical here.

    --
    Tim Slattery
    Tim Slattery, Jan 18, 2013
    #5
  6. Stefan Ram

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    On 1/18/13 1:08 PM, Tim Slattery wrote:
    > -berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:
    >
    >
    >> In fact, in another bus, later, I heard another person, a
    >> boy, speaking English in an American way, who said »What did
    >> he do/say?« (or something like this) pronounced as »What did
    >> he do slash say?« - I never heard this use of »slash« before!

    >
    > IM(NS)HO, that's ugly. It's certainly not typical here.
    >

    I've heard it, but more often that's pronounced "or" rather than "slash"
    when used in an utterance.
    Daniel Pitts, Jan 18, 2013
    #6
  7. Stefan Ram

    FredK Guest

    On Friday, January 18, 2013 1:36:39 PM UTC-8, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > On 1/18/13 1:08 PM, Tim Slattery wrote: > -berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote: > > >> In fact, in another bus, later, I heard another person, a >> boy, speaking English in an American way, who said �What did >> he do/say?� (or something like this) pronounced as �What did >> he do slash say?� - I never heard this use of �slash� before! > > IM(NS)HO, that's ugly. It's certainly not typical here. > I've heard it, but more often that's pronounced "or" rather than "slash" when used in an utterance.


    But pronouncing the "slash" is getting more common, especially in light of
    the Web (Ugh!). What bothers me is when people say "forward slash" instead of
    just "slash".
    FredK, Jan 18, 2013
    #7
  8. Stefan Ram

    Roedy Green Guest

    On 18 Jan 2013 18:37:42 GMT, -berlin.de (Stefan Ram)
    wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    > nought point oh one?


    Here on the west coast of Canada it would be zero point zero one.
    or more likely shortened to point zero one, or more informally point
    oh one.
    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products http://mindprod.com
    The first 90% of the code accounts for the first 90% of the development time.
    The remaining 10% of the code accounts for the other 90% of the development
    time.
    ~ Tom Cargill Ninety-ninety Law
    Roedy Green, Jan 18, 2013
    #8
  9. Stefan Ram

    Lew Guest

    markspace wrote:
    > Stefan Ram wrote:
    >> In a Java programming class in Sunnyvale (U.S.A.), how would
    >> 0.01 usually be pronounced?


    There are many ways.

    >> nought point oh one?

    >
    > "Point zero one," or "one one-hundredth," is how I'd pronounce it.


    No.

    The first would be spelled, ".01" and the second "1/100" or such. One might
    say a synonym when reading it, but literally to pronounce it requires more precision.

    Otherwise the answer to "Are '0.01' and '1/100th' pronounced the same?" would be "Yes."

    > Maybe "zero point zero one." "Oh" is OK too in place of "zero."


    Agreed.

    You have binary explosion: "zero point oh one", "oh point zero one", "oh point oh one".

    > Americans do not use "nought." In fact my spell checker flags it as a
    > misspelling.


    I'm an American and I use "nought", "naught", "ought" and "aught" for "nil" or "zero".

    But then, I'm an educated American. Who was excited to survive to the 21st Century so I
    could experience the oughts.

    Your spell checker was loaded by an ignoramus.

    Whether you'd *say* "zero point zero one" depends on whether you care to
    pronounce the word as written or simply convey the meaning.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Jan 19, 2013
    #9
  10. Stefan Ram

    Lew Guest

    Stefan Ram wrote:
    > nought point oh one?


    But Mousie, thou art no thy lane,
    In proving foresight may be vain:
    The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men
    Gang aft agley,
    An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain,
    For promis'd joy!

    "To a Mouse, on Turning Her Up in Her Nest with the Plough"
    Robert Burns
    Lew, Jan 19, 2013
    #10
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