Java Enterprise Edition evaluation

Discussion in 'Java' started by Snyke, Aug 15, 2007.

  1. Snyke

    Snyke Guest

    Hi all,

    I'm currently trying to evaluate all the possible frameworks that are
    out on the web for my next project, namely a Web Application that acts
    as a simulation of a financial system. This means that I have to have
    a good persistence framework, an easy way to implement business logic
    and an easy way to translate the data into HTML-Pages.
    As for the persistence framework it would be nice to have something
    flexible enough so that I can add an external workhorse that takes
    care of the simulation itself.

    So far I have the following list of things to consider:
    - Persistence
    - Hibernate
    - OJB
    -Display/Logic
    - Spring
    - Tapestry
    - EJB
    What do you think about them?

    Regards,
    Christian decker
    --
    http://www.snyke.net
    Snyke, Aug 15, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Snyke

    Guest

    I think that's quite enough, try servlets as well
    , Aug 16, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Snyke

    Lew Guest

    wrote:
    > I think that's quite enough, try servlets as well


    I favor knowing how to tune a car before talking to the mechanic.

    I'd start with JSP and servlets with Java Server Faces (JSF) and the Java
    Persistence API. (I am just starting to learn the Persistence API. I
    actually started with JSP, servlets, coding my own MVC framework and writing
    my own data access framework.) That really makes one appreciate frameworks
    like JSF, Struts, Persistence API, Hibernate or whatever, because now one
    groks from first-hand experience what they're accomplishing.

    Or failing to accomplish.

    I've worked with people who knew the Struts API cold but didn't understand the
    Model-View-Controller concept. It led to some peculiar choices.

    I have doubts about many of these frameworks. I haven't used Hibernate, but I
    worked on a project that used Torque, another "object-relational" framework.
    Yecch. It's easier to just code PreparedStatements with JDBC. I found the
    overhead of Torque egregious, and it restricted me from much of the power of
    the database.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Aug 16, 2007
    #3
  4. Snyke

    Snyke Guest

    On Aug 16, 2:10 pm, Lew <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > I think that's quite enough, try servlets as well

    >
    > I favor knowing how to tune a car before talking to the mechanic.
    >
    > I'd start with JSP and servlets with Java Server Faces (JSF) and the Java
    > Persistence API. (I am just starting to learn the Persistence API. I
    > actually started with JSP, servlets, coding my own MVC framework and writing
    > my own data access framework.) That really makes one appreciate frameworks
    > like JSF, Struts, Persistence API, Hibernate or whatever, because now one
    > groks from first-hand experience what they're accomplishing.
    >
    > Or failing to accomplish.
    >
    > I've worked with people who knew the Struts API cold but didn't understand the
    > Model-View-Controller concept. It led to some peculiar choices.
    >
    > I have doubts about many of these frameworks. I haven't used Hibernate, but I
    > worked on a project that used Torque, another "object-relational" framework.
    > Yecch. It's easier to just code PreparedStatements with JDBC. I found the
    > overhead of Torque egregious, and it restricted me from much of the power of
    > the database.
    >
    > --
    > Lew


    Way back I already used Hibernate for the persistence of the data onto
    a relational db, and I found it quite good, as I spent a lot of time
    manually mapping my php-objects to a database before. The problem is
    that I want this application to be build on top of solid foundations
    as it might grow over time, and I'm currently very interested in the
    spring framework. I also used some MVC-Frameworks on client
    applications and I feel pretty comfortable with it. As for the
    tradeoff of ease to program and speed using Hibernate, yeah that might
    be a problem later in the productive environment but as I understand
    it, it shouldn't be too hard to exchange the persistence layer when
    using Spring.
    Anything I'm missing?

    Regards,
    Christian
    --
    http://www.snyke.net
    Snyke, Aug 18, 2007
    #4
  5. Snyke

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Wed, 15 Aug 2007 16:45:49 -0000, Snyke <>
    wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    > - Tapestry


    Check out that is still active. I have not heard much about it in
    recent years.
    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
    The Java Glossary
    http://mindprod.com
    Roedy Green, Aug 19, 2007
    #5
  6. Roedy Green wrote:
    > On Wed, 15 Aug 2007 16:45:49 -0000, Snyke <>
    > wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :
    >> - Tapestry

    >
    > Check out that is still active. I have not heard much about it in
    > recent years.


    http://archive.apache.org/dist/tapestry/ indicates
    that they are still sending out new releases rather
    frequently.

    Arne
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Aug 19, 2007
    #6
  7. Snyke wrote:
    > Way back I already used Hibernate for the persistence of the data onto
    > a relational db, and I found it quite good, as I spent a lot of time
    > manually mapping my php-objects to a database before. The problem is
    > that I want this application to be build on top of solid foundations
    > as it might grow over time, and I'm currently very interested in the
    > spring framework. I also used some MVC-Frameworks on client
    > applications and I feel pretty comfortable with it. As for the
    > tradeoff of ease to program and speed using Hibernate, yeah that might
    > be a problem later in the productive environment but as I understand
    > it, it shouldn't be too hard to exchange the persistence layer when
    > using Spring.


    I think that Spring *and* Hibernate is a very common combination.

    It is probably more common than any other Spring and database access
    combination - including JdbcTemplate.

    Arne
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Aug 19, 2007
    #7
  8. Snyke wrote:
    > I'm currently trying to evaluate all the possible frameworks that are
    > out on the web for my next project, namely a Web Application that acts
    > as a simulation of a financial system. This means that I have to have
    > a good persistence framework, an easy way to implement business logic
    > and an easy way to translate the data into HTML-Pages.
    > As for the persistence framework it would be nice to have something
    > flexible enough so that I can add an external workhorse that takes
    > care of the simulation itself.
    >
    > So far I have the following list of things to consider:
    > - Persistence
    > - Hibernate
    > - OJB
    > -Display/Logic
    > - Spring
    > - Tapestry
    > - EJB
    > What do you think about them?


    Display: JSF
    Logic: Spring and/or EJB
    Persistence: Hibernate or EJB3

    Arne
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Aug 19, 2007
    #8
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Replies:
    3
    Views:
    534
  2. Ilias Lazaridis
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    378
    Ilias Lazaridis
    Apr 24, 2005
  3. DaveJohnson12@nomail.
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    548
    DaveJohnson12@nomail.
    Mar 31, 2008
  4. Ilias Lazaridis
    Replies:
    74
    Views:
    715
    Ilias Lazaridis
    Apr 4, 2005
  5. Ilias Lazaridis
    Replies:
    18
    Views:
    319
    Bill Guindon
    Apr 9, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page