Java IDE for sloooooow laptop

Discussion in 'Java' started by action8@gmail.com, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. Guest

    When I go on travel, I get stuck with an older laptop (1.4 Ghz, 512MB).
    I usually need to use most of that memory for an app server and a
    bunch of hungry processes. I like to TDD, so I'm really looking for an
    IDE that has the following qualities:

    A) Loads quick with < 100MB available.
    B) Point it at a folder and give it some dependencies, and your
    project is set up. Netbeans3.6 style is about as painful as I'm
    willing to tolerate.
    C) One button compile, one button run a java file with all the
    classpath from the project.


    Right now I edit in jedit and then use ant to build. I'm leaning
    towards writing ant tasks to run tests, but I was hoping for something
    that doesn't require me to flip back and forth between an editor and
    the command line, plus I like to link back and forth between test
    failures and the code that caused it.

    I also don't get to "install" stuff on the computer. I can, but I have
    to return the laptop without the installed apps. So something that I
    can drag on and run is highly preferred.

    Our team uses netbeans 4.0 and 5.0, both are totally unacceptable on
    this machine. Eclipse is a smidgen better, but not great enough to
    justify maintaining another set of project files (the project (which is
    really dozens of subprojects) tends to change just enough between trips
    to cause pain). I'm not really an emacs or vi guy, but if they'll get
    the job done I'll learn some key bindings.

    Any suggestions? Any great little IDE that doesn't do everything but
    can compile and run a junit test?
     
    , Mar 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. Oliver Wong Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Right now I edit in jedit and then use ant to build. I'm leaning
    > towards writing ant tasks to run tests, but I was hoping for something
    > that doesn't require me to flip back and forth between an editor and
    > the command line, plus I like to link back and forth between test
    > failures and the code that caused it.


    You can install ANT plugins, and even a command-line plugin for JEdit.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Mar 15, 2006
    #2
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  3. Joe Attardi Guest

    > Right now I edit in jedit and then use ant to build. I'm leaning
    > towards writing ant tasks to run tests, but I was hoping for something
    > that doesn't require me to flip back and forth between an editor and
    > the command line, plus I like to link back and forth between test
    > failures and the code that caused it.

    jEdit has several plugins that you can install to add this
    functionality:

    AntFarm lets you run Ant tasks by clicking on a target name. Then
    you'll want to also install ErrorList. These three plugins work in
    tandem so when your Ant build fails, it shows the errors. If you have
    the Project Manager plugin installed (I think), you can click on the
    error messages and jump to that place in the source code.

    There is also a JUnit plugin for running tests.

    Go to the Plugin Manager from within jEdit or head over to
    http://plugins.jedit.org/ to find these.

    --
    Joe Attardi
     
    Joe Attardi, Mar 15, 2006
    #3
  4. Timo Stamm Guest

    schrieb:
    > When I go on travel, I get stuck with an older laptop (1.4 Ghz, 512MB).
    > [...]
    > Any suggestions? Any great little IDE that doesn't do everything but
    > can compile and run a junit test?


    IntelliJ IDEA is a complete IDE (a very good one, according to the Java
    Developer’s Journal Readers [1]). It performs much better than Eclipse
    on my laptop (1,33ghz PPC, 768mb), but I don't know if it's fast enough
    for you.

    However, I would rather put more RAM into the laptop and use the IDE I like.


    Timo

    ___
    1: http://jdj.sys-con.com/read/171303_3.htm
     
    Timo Stamm, Mar 15, 2006
    #4
  5. Roedy Green Guest

    On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 23:45:31 +0100, Timo Stamm <>
    wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    >IntelliJ IDEA is a complete IDE (a very good one, according to the Java
    >Developer’s Journal Readers [1]). It performs much better than Eclipse
    >on my laptop (1,33ghz PPC, 768mb), but I don't know if it's fast enough
    >for you.
    >
    >However, I would rather put more RAM into the laptop and use the IDE I like.


    I have 512 MB ram. IntelliJ itself is faster than Eclipse, though
    extremely slow to load. However, Eclipse puts relatively little
    burden on background tasks. I can barely run anything else with
    IntelliJ going, just some very ram-light things like Agent and
    SlickEdit.

    After the next month's rent is paid, if there is anything left over I
    am going for another 512 MB of RAM. I trust that is the problem.

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Java custom programming, consulting and coaching.
     
    Roedy Green, Mar 16, 2006
    #5
  6. wrote:
    > When I go on travel, I get stuck with an older laptop (1.4 Ghz, 512MB).
    > I usually need to use most of that memory for an app server and a
    > bunch of hungry processes. I like to TDD, so I'm really looking for an
    > IDE that has the following qualities:
    >
    > A) Loads quick with < 100MB available.
    > B) Point it at a folder and give it some dependencies, and your
    > project is set up. Netbeans3.6 style is about as painful as I'm
    > willing to tolerate.
    > C) One button compile, one button run a java file with all the
    > classpath from the project.
    >


    Also I run NetBeans 5.0 happily with a 1Ghz Athlon with 512MB I can
    understand that you might want to look for something faster.

    Give GEL a try. It is freeware but no longer maintained and written in
    Delphi and thus starts and loads very quick.

    You can download it here:

    http://memescape.co.uk/gexperts/download.html

    I don't think it offers any support for running JUnit though, but it can
    deal with Ant files which you could use to integrate your JUnit tests.

    Thomas
     
    Thomas Kellerer, Mar 16, 2006
    #6
  7. IchBin Guest

    Thomas Kellerer wrote:
    > wrote:
    >> When I go on travel, I get stuck with an older laptop (1.4 Ghz, 512MB).
    >> I usually need to use most of that memory for an app server and a
    >> bunch of hungry processes. I like to TDD, so I'm really looking for an
    >> IDE that has the following qualities:
    >>
    >> A) Loads quick with < 100MB available.
    >> B) Point it at a folder and give it some dependencies, and your
    >> project is set up. Netbeans3.6 style is about as painful as I'm
    >> willing to tolerate.
    >> C) One button compile, one button run a java file with all the
    >> classpath from the project.
    >>

    >
    > Also I run NetBeans 5.0 happily with a 1Ghz Athlon with 512MB I can
    > understand that you might want to look for something faster.
    >
    > Give GEL a try. It is freeware but no longer maintained and written in
    > Delphi and thus starts and loads very quick.
    >
    > You can download it here:
    >
    > http://memescape.co.uk/gexperts/download.html
    >
    > I don't think it offers any support for running JUnit though, but it can
    > deal with Ant files which you could use to integrate your JUnit tests.
    >
    > Thomas
    >

    You could try JGRASP>>

    http://www.jgrasp.org

    Thanks in Advance...
    IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA
    http://weconsultants.servebeer.com/JHackerAppManager
    __________________________________________________________________________

    'If there is one, Knowledge is the "Fountain of Youth"'
    -William E. Taylor, Regular Guy (1952-)
     
    IchBin, Mar 16, 2006
    #7
  8. wrote:
    > When I go on travel, I get stuck with an older laptop (1.4 Ghz, 512MB).
    > I usually need to use most of that memory for an app server and a
    > bunch of hungry processes. I like to TDD, so I'm really looking for an
    > IDE that has the following qualities:
    >
    > A) Loads quick with < 100MB available.
    > B) Point it at a folder and give it some dependencies, and your
    > project is set up. Netbeans3.6 style is about as painful as I'm
    > willing to tolerate.
    > C) One button compile, one button run a java file with all the
    > classpath from the project.
    >
    >
    > Right now I edit in jedit and then use ant to build. I'm leaning
    > towards writing ant tasks to run tests, but I was hoping for something
    > that doesn't require me to flip back and forth between an editor and
    > the command line, plus I like to link back and forth between test
    > failures and the code that caused it.
    >
    > I also don't get to "install" stuff on the computer. I can, but I have
    > to return the laptop without the installed apps. So something that I
    > can drag on and run is highly preferred.
    >
    > Our team uses netbeans 4.0 and 5.0, both are totally unacceptable on
    > this machine. Eclipse is a smidgen better, but not great enough to
    > justify maintaining another set of project files (the project (which is
    > really dozens of subprojects) tends to change just enough between trips
    > to cause pain). I'm not really an emacs or vi guy, but if they'll get
    > the job done I'll learn some key bindings.
    >
    > Any suggestions? Any great little IDE that doesn't do everything but
    > can compile and run a junit test?
    >

    I would take a look at jCreator (http://www.jcreator.com), read this
    review to see why: http://www.techbookreport.com/tbr0173.html.

    HTH

    --
    TechBookReport Java http://www.techbookreport.com/JavaIndex.html
     
    TechBookReport, Mar 16, 2006
    #8
  9. Personally I use vi most regardless of machine power. Always inside
    the IDE that is unix (cygwin provides unix tools under windows). This
    environment works on weak machines.

    I do understand that the environment is very different from most IDE
    tools like Eclipse, NetBeans and JBuilder. The difference increases
    learning distance for those with experience in those environments.


    Opalinski

    http://www.geocities.com/opalpaweb/
     
    opalinski from opalpaweb, Mar 16, 2006
    #9
  10. Thomas Kellerer wrote:
    > wrote:
    >> When I go on travel, I get stuck with an older laptop (1.4 Ghz, 512MB).
    >> I usually need to use most of that memory for an app server and a
    >> bunch of hungry processes. I like to TDD, so I'm really looking for an
    >> IDE that has the following qualities:
    >>
    >> A) Loads quick with < 100MB available.
    >> B) Point it at a folder and give it some dependencies, and your
    >> project is set up. Netbeans3.6 style is about as painful as I'm
    >> willing to tolerate.
    >> C) One button compile, one button run a java file with all the
    >> classpath from the project.
    >>
    >>

    > Give GEL a try. It is freeware but no longer maintained and written in
    > Delphi and thus starts and loads very quick.
    >
    > You can download it here:
    >
    > http://memescape.co.uk/gexperts/download.html
    >
    > I don't think it offers any support for running JUnit though, but it can
    > deal with Ant files which you could use to integrate your JUnit tests.


    Actually Gel does have integrated support for JUnit.

    Another feature I like quite a bit is "Smart Folders." You can say that
    everything in a folder is in the project (based on a modifiable list of
    extensions) and it will automatically update the project when files are
    moved in and out. A feature I sorely missed in JCreator when I used it a
    few years back.
     
    Chris Riesbeck, Mar 16, 2006
    #10
  11. Guest

    Thanks for all the responses. I'll check out the jedit plugins, gel,
    jgrasp and jcreator. The less than 100MB is a pretty hard requirement,
    and I have a better chance of a new laptop magically appearing (with a
    case of beer on the side) than getting a memory upgrade.

    I had a free license for intellij and never could find the time to play
    with it before it expired. I used vi years ago, but I never used it to
    compile or run tests, I didn't think it could. The editor's not all
    the important (syntax highlighting is nice), it's the integration that
    I really want, without paying the memory price of an eclipse or
    netbeans.
     
    , Mar 17, 2006
    #11
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