java ide platform a non java language

Discussion in 'Java' started by falcon, Feb 28, 2006.

  1. falcon

    falcon Guest

    Hi,
    I know there are at least three java IDE/Platforms which claim to be
    very extensible: Eclipse, Netbeans and jEdit. I am thinking of writing
    a little IDE for a small, non-mainstream language. Which one of the
    existing IDEs is likely to be the easiest to extend? Provide most
    functionality for the least effort?

    I don't care about the license, and I am looking to provide at least
    the following functionality:
    - Syntax highlighting (obviously)
    - Some sort of library browser
    - Intellisense
    - Integration with the compiler/interpreter

    ....the usual 'beyond notepad' type stuff.

    Look forward to some good advice, thanks!
     
    falcon, Feb 28, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. falcon

    Rhino Guest

    "falcon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > I know there are at least three java IDE/Platforms which claim to be
    > very extensible: Eclipse, Netbeans and jEdit. I am thinking of writing
    > a little IDE for a small, non-mainstream language. Which one of the
    > existing IDEs is likely to be the easiest to extend? Provide most
    > functionality for the least effort?
    >
    > I don't care about the license, and I am looking to provide at least
    > the following functionality:
    > - Syntax highlighting (obviously)
    > - Some sort of library browser
    > - Intellisense
    > - Integration with the compiler/interpreter
    >
    > ...the usual 'beyond notepad' type stuff.
    >
    > Look forward to some good advice, thanks!
    >

    From the list you've given, I've only used Eclipse but it seems to be
    expressly designed for the sort of thing you want to do. Since I've never
    used them, I wasn't aware that the others even claimed to be extensible so I
    can't say if they'd be easier for what you are planning.

    --
    Rhino
     
    Rhino, Feb 28, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. falcon

    Roedy Green Guest

    Roedy Green, Mar 1, 2006
    #3
  4. falcon

    David Segall Guest

    "falcon" <> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >I know there are at least three java IDE/Platforms which claim to be
    >very extensible: Eclipse, Netbeans and jEdit. I am thinking of writing
    >a little IDE for a small, non-mainstream language. Which one of the
    >existing IDEs is likely to be the easiest to extend? Provide most
    >functionality for the least effort?
    >
    >I don't care about the license, and I am looking to provide at least
    >the following functionality:
    >- Syntax highlighting (obviously)
    >- Some sort of library browser
    >- Intellisense
    >- Integration with the compiler/interpreter
    >
    >...the usual 'beyond notepad' type stuff.
    >
    >Look forward to some good advice, thanks!

    I can't compare them but there is an impressive flash demo of building
    an HTML editor using the NetBeans platform here
    <http://www.javalobby.org/eps/netbeans_platform/>. Go to item 4, the
    first demo. It takes 5 minutes! It is cheating because NetBeans
    already has syntax highlighting for HTML but worth a look.
     
    David Segall, Mar 1, 2006
    #4
  5. falcon

    falcon Guest

    Thanks Roedy. Some of the information is a little old but still a nice
    comprehensive list.

    For others who may read this later, it looks like Eclipse had a project
    called LDT for 'dynamic' languages, but apparently that proposal was
    withdrawn. There is now work to extend CDT (C/C++ functionality of
    Eclipse) to work with other languages which are based on the GNU
    debugger and compiler (Phortran is a project which is porting fortran
    to eclipse). It is still in early stages though.

    Netbeans apparently has a project called Coyote, and is currently being
    developed for Groovy and Jython. I didn't find too many developer
    docs.

    Netbeans and Eclipse are complex pieces of software, I was hoping that
    Jedit would be simpler to extend. That may indeed be true but their
    documentation for developers (not users) looks to be a little shallow.
    I found that syntax can be highlighted using an xml file that doesn't
    look too complicated...a good sign. I still have to look at how I can
    provide intellisense. I expect an 'extensible' editor/ide to provide
    some datastructures and utlities to help me build intellisense, I don't
    expect to have to build the whole thing myself.

    Apparently there has been some talk of extending IDEs for 'dynamic' or
    'scripting' languages. They are usually defined as
    non-statically-typed (dynamically typed?) , higher level languages such
    as python, perl and ruby. Where do languages such as Haskell and ML
    fit in? I get the feeling that 'dynamically typed' has less to do with
    a language's actual type system and is instead used as a definition of
    languages which do not require a code-compile-[link/jar]-run cycle.
    For example, Haskell is very well typed (I'm using the word loosely my
    self here), but it can be run as a read-eval loop. A bit of a
    digression, and probably a moot point since the infrastructure for
    'scripting' languages is still in early stages.

    And finally, I only spent two or three hours looking at this stuff so
    take it with a grain of salt :)
     
    falcon, Mar 1, 2006
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Alan
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    359
  2. Pimousse
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    3,639
    Roedy Green
    Apr 21, 2004
  3. jcc
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    4,708
    Nigel Wade
    May 12, 2006
  4. Coca
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    645
    Alan Balmer
    Jan 14, 2004
  5. Kaspar Schiess

    platform.rb (was: PLATFORM tests)

    Kaspar Schiess, Nov 25, 2005, in forum: Ruby
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    128
    Kaspar Schiess
    Nov 25, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page