Java, PHP and dotNet

Discussion in 'Java' started by ronny.meeus@gmail.com, Sep 19, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Hello,
    there are currenly a lot of technologies existing do build Web
    applications, e.g. PHP, Java, DotNet, Ruby (on Rails), Python etc.

    If I look on the other hand to the web space providing companies I see
    most of them supporting only PHP and MySQL. If I want to go to a Java
    Application server, for example Tomcat, it is not so easy to find and I
    have to pay at lot more.

    So my basic conclusions are:
    - PHP is superior for most web applications.
    - The rest of the technologies described before are to be used either
    by:
    big companies with their own servers and/or a lot of money
    intranets
    doing some playing/experimenting at home

    Please comment.

    Ronny
     
    , Sep 19, 2006
    #1
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  2. Oliver Wong Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    > there are currenly a lot of technologies existing do build Web
    > applications, e.g. PHP, Java, DotNet, Ruby (on Rails), Python etc.
    >
    > If I look on the other hand to the web space providing companies I see
    > most of them supporting only PHP and MySQL. If I want to go to a Java
    > Application server, for example Tomcat, it is not so easy to find and I
    > have to pay at lot more.
    >
    > So my basic conclusions are:
    > - PHP is superior for most web applications.
    > - The rest of the technologies described before are to be used either
    > by:
    > big companies with their own servers and/or a lot of money
    > intranets
    > doing some playing/experimenting at home
    >
    > Please comment.


    (1) It does not logically follow that something cheap and abundant is
    nescessarily superior than something expensive and rare.
    (2) PHP is IMHO a forked language: PHP5 is not backwards compatible with
    PHP4. Many hosting companies will provide PHP4 servers, but few provide PHP5
    servers.
    (3) "Most web applications" and "doing some playing/experimenting at
    home" probably has significant overlap.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Sep 19, 2006
    #2
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  3. writes:

    > - PHP is superior for most web applications.


    Well, it's simpler at least. Add many of the mature web technologies
    for the other two (like JSF, ASP.Net), and they will beat PHP for
    anything other than toy projects - so I think you have their roles
    reversed. :)
     
    Tor Iver Wilhelmsen, Sep 19, 2006
    #3
  4. wrote:
    > there are currenly a lot of technologies existing do build Web
    > applications, e.g. PHP, Java, DotNet, Ruby (on Rails), Python etc.
    >
    > If I look on the other hand to the web space providing companies I see
    > most of them supporting only PHP and MySQL. If I want to go to a Java
    > Application server, for example Tomcat, it is not so easy to find and I
    > have to pay at lot more.
    >
    > So my basic conclusions are:
    > - PHP is superior for most web applications.
    > - The rest of the technologies described before are to be used either
    > by:
    > big companies with their own servers and/or a lot of money
    > intranets
    > doing some playing/experimenting at home


    Java and ASP.NET have a rather steep learning curve and
    are mostly geared towards IT professionals.

    PHP and ASP are easier for non programmers.

    This makes the market for PHP much bigger than
    the market for JSP.

    And most web hotels goes after the big market.

    Furthermore PHP has a lot good free ready to run
    apps which also adds to its popularity.

    So your first dash is not true unless you define
    superior=easy.

    Your second dash is more or less true.

    Arne
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Sep 20, 2006
    #4
  5. kevin cline Guest

    wrote:
    > Hello,
    > there are currenly a lot of technologies existing do build Web
    > applications, e.g. PHP, Java, DotNet, Ruby (on Rails), Python etc.
    >
    > If I look on the other hand to the web space providing companies I see
    > most of them supporting only PHP and MySQL. If I want to go to a Java
    > Application server, for example Tomcat, it is not so easy to find and I
    > have to pay at lot more.
    >
    > So my basic conclusions are:
    > - PHP is superior for most web applications.


    > Please comment.


    For most development projects, the cost of writing and maintaining the
    code overwhelms the cost of running code. Therefore the best language
    for a development project is almost always the language that allows the
    solution to be written with the least code.
     
    kevin cline, Sep 20, 2006
    #5
  6. In article <>, wrote:
    > Hello,
    > there are currenly a lot of technologies existing do build Web
    > applications, e.g. PHP, Java, DotNet, Ruby (on Rails), Python etc.
    >
    > If I look on the other hand to the web space providing companies I see
    > most of them supporting only PHP and MySQL. If I want to go to a Java
    > Application server, for example Tomcat, it is not so easy to find and I
    > have to pay at lot more.


    Not necessarily true, you just have to look harder...

    > So my basic conclusions are:
    > - PHP is superior for most web applications.


    I love PHP, but this is not necessarily true. It's just more popular, and
    in many cases easier to work with.

    Have you googled "java hosting" ?

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek ** Java/VB/VC/PHP/Perl ** Linux/*BSD/Windows
    Apple Valley, California PGP:0xE3AE35ED

    It's all fun and games until someone starts a bonfire in the living room.
     
    Steven J. Sobol, Sep 20, 2006
    #6
  7. Ronny Guest

    Ronny, Sep 20, 2006
    #7
  8. Ronny Guest

    Ronny, Sep 20, 2006
    #8
  9. wrote:
    > So my basic conclusions are:
    > - PHP is superior for most web applications.
    > - The rest of the technologies described before are to be used either
    > by:
    > big companies with their own servers and/or a lot of money
    > intranets
    > doing some playing/experimenting at home
    >
    > Please comment.


    Could you please move your language advocacy to an advocacy group?


    --
    The comp.lang.java.gui FAQ:
    ftp://ftp.cs.uu.nl/pub/NEWS.ANSWERS/computer-lang/java/gui/faq
    http://www.uni-giessen.de/faq/archiv/computer-lang.java.gui.faq/
     
    Thomas Weidenfeller, Sep 20, 2006
    #9
  10. David Segall Guest

    wrote:

    >Hello,
    >there are currenly a lot of technologies existing do build Web
    >applications, e.g. PHP, Java, DotNet, Ruby (on Rails), Python etc.
    >
    >If I look on the other hand to the web space providing companies I see
    >most of them supporting only PHP and MySQL. If I want to go to a Java
    >Application server, for example Tomcat, it is not so easy to find and I
    >have to pay at lot more.
    >
    >So my basic conclusions are:
    >- PHP is superior for most web applications.
    >- The rest of the technologies described before are to be used either
    >by:
    > big companies with their own servers and/or a lot of money
    > intranets
    > doing some playing/experimenting at home

    You have failed to tell us what you really want to do. If you are
    arguing that PHP and MySQL are the most popular, and therefore often
    the cheapest, web server hosting combination you already know you are
    right.

    However, if you want to include the cost of writing the application
    then you may like to examine ASP and JSP tools here
    <http://webdevelopment.profectus.com.au/ee_programming_webdevelopment.html>.
    If you visit then you will be going to a site where the _only_ cost on
    top of my standard Internet access fee is to register the domain name.
    The server happens to be Tomcat but I could change it to an ASP and/or
    J2EE server.
     
    David Segall, Sep 20, 2006
    #10
  11. kevin cline wrote:
    > For most development projects, the cost of writing and maintaining the
    > code overwhelms the cost of running code. Therefore the best language
    > for a development project is almost always the language that allows the
    > solution to be written with the least code.


    Most important: easy to maintain.

    Easy to maintain does not always mean the least code.

    Arne
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Sep 21, 2006
    #11
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